The historical pharaohs of the Bible

bambubambu Posts: 2,558
edited May 2012 in R & R (Religion and Race)
There are several mentions of Egyptian Pharaohs in the Bible. However, only three of these Pharaohs can be placed historically…..

Pharaoh Taharqa (reigned 690-664 BC) 2 Kings 19:9 and Isaiah 37:9 is mentioned as the opponent of Sennacherib of Assyria. He was of Nubian descent and is called King of Ethiopia/Cush, and hence is not given the title pharaoh. However, his title as king of Egypt is authenticated in Egyptian documents.
220px-SphinxOfTaharqa.jpg


Pharaoh Necho II (610-595 BCE), and Jeremiah 44:30 mentions his successor Apries or Hophra (589-570 BC).
Of all these stories, the dealings of Necho II and Josiah, King of Judah is most revealing……
apries_louvre.JPG


2 Chronicles Chapter 35

20 After all this, when Josiah had prepared the temple, Neco king of Egypt went up to fight against Carchemish by the Euphrates; and Josiah went out against him.

21 But he sent ambassadors to him, saying: 'What have I to do with thee, thou king of Judah? I come not against thee this day, but against the house wherewith I have war; and God hath given command to speed me; forbear thee from meddling with God, who is with me, that He destroy thee not.'

22 Nevertheless Josiah would not turn his face from him, but disguised himself, that he might fight with him, and hearkened not unto the words of Neco, from the mouth of God, and came to fight in the valley of Megiddo.

23 And the archers shot at king Josiah; and the king said to his servants: 'Have me away; for I am sore wounded.'

24 So his servants took him out of the chariot, and put him in the second chariot that he had, and brought him to Jerusalem; and he died, and was buried in the sepulchres of his fathers. And all Judah and Jerusalem mourned for Josiah.

Replies

  • MissKMissK Posts: 2,857
    Nice post, very rich history through Egypt and its people.

    The women are of particular interest to me. Moses, who was born during the reign of Tutmoses I (and refused to become Pharaoh) wrote about Hatshepsut (a rare female Pharaoh) and her death during his exile. Exodus 2:23 states, "During that long period, the king of Egypt died."

    Hatshepsut did all she could to gain support of her people and was a master politician-

    "To quell the fears of her people, she became a "king" in all statuary and relief during her reign. She even dressed in the traditional garb of male rulers: the shendyt kilt, the nemes headdress with its uraeus and khat headcloth, and the false beard. Although there were no wars during her reign, she proved her sovereignty by ordering expeditions to the land of Punt, in present-day Somalia, in search of the ivory, animals, spices, gold and aromatic trees that Egyptians coveted. These expeditions are well documented in the hieroglyphic inscriptions on the walls of her temple."
  • bambubambu Posts: 2,558
    edited May 2012
    No doubt sister, @SpecialK

    Women were viewed differently before the introduction of European thought....

    Hatshepsut, a female of Nubian ancestry was one of the most powerful pharaohs. An excellent descripion of her life is illustrated in World's Great Men of Color by J.A. Rodgers
    knightsofimhoteplibrary.blogspot.com/2011/04/overview-of-black-history-dr-john.html#.T76dlsVD6So

    Hatshepsut's great grand mother was Queen Ahmose Nefertari 18th Dynasty (1550-1525 BC)
    anef2.jpg
    She was deified after her death and became the "Lady of The West"

    Also check Queen Amanishaketo, a Nubian queen that defeated the Roman army and sent them back north on their African conquest. Her daughter, Amanitore, is also mentioned in the Bible (Acts 8:27)

    Many historians and scholars will tell you that their was no impact made by women of sub-Saharan descent on the ancient world. However they are all lying or grossly misinformed.

    wysinger.homestead.com/ancientafrica3.html

    HOTEP........




  • UPTOWNCONNEXXUPTOWNCONNEXX Posts: 12,979
    bambu wrote: »
    No doubt sister, @SpecialK

    Women were viewed differently before the introduction of European thought....

    Hatshepsut, a female of Nubian ancestry was one of the most powerful pharaohs. An excellent descripion of her life is illustrated in World's Great Men of Color by J.A. Rodgers
    knightsofimhoteplibrary.blogspot.com/2011/04/overview-of-black-history-dr-john.html#.T76dlsVD6So

    Hatshepsut's great grand mother was Queen Ahmose Nefertari 18th Dynasty (1550-1525 BC)
    anef2.jpg
    She was deified after her death and became the "Lady of The West"

    Also check Queen Amanishaketo, a Nubian queen that defeated the Roman army and sent them back north on their African conquest. Her daughter, Amanitore, is also mentioned in the Bible (Acts 8:27)

    Many historians and scholars will tell you that their was no impact made by women of sub-Saharan descent on the ancient world. However they are all lying or grossly misinformed.

    wysinger.homestead.com/ancientafrica3.html

    HOTEP........



    im sorry but thats not a good video to post. these white folks have no business being in nubia and will certainly mistranslate and bring european ideas and reasoning into whatever they can. i stopped the video as soon as i heard them say that egyptians enslaved nubians ....

  • bambubambu Posts: 2,558
    edited May 2012
    No doubt @UPTOWN CONNEXX

    I agree, I only posted the video because a few cats around here have displayed a low level of reading comprehension skills.

    I dont agree with alot of the views in that video. However, if you sift through the bullshit you can find a few jewels. There is an excavation taking place now (that the documentary was based on) that may provide groundbreaking discoveries in Meroe, Sudan.... If you sift through the bullshit, of course.
    bookleteer.com/book.html?id=850#page/1/mode/1up



    Again, I only really post videos because most people wont read any further.

    Better information can be found in the links...

    knightsofimhoteplibrary.blogspot.com/2011/04/overview-of-black-history-dr-john.html#.T76dlsVD6So

    wysinger.homestead.com/ancientafrica3.html

    HOTEP
  • bambubambu Posts: 2,558
    edited June 2012
    Acts 8:27
    So he got up and went; and there was an Ethiopian eunuch, a court official of Candace, queen of the Ethiopians, who was in charge of all her treasure; and he had come to Jerusalem to worship,





  • bambubambu Posts: 2,558
    Who was the pharaoh of the Exodus?

    Seti II,Tuthmosis III or Hatshepsut, Ramesses I, Akhenaten, Ahmose I ????




    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR7Ujea_DHM-_ZfdIxDHM2k7Pt1RICZcF2R3mZk5hJ5GSwX02NK

    Ahmose I ????

    220px-Pyramid_of_Ahmose%2C_Abydos%2C_1998.png
    The Pyramid of Ahmose I was built not as a tomb, but a cenotaph for pharaoh Ahmose I at the necropolis of Abydos. It was the only royal pyramid built in this area. Today only a pile of rubble remains, reaching a height of about 10 m.

    The Tempest Stele was erected by the Pharaoh Ahmose I (orthodox dates1570-1546 BC) the founder of dynasty Eighteen and the New Kingdom. The stele describes the great storm that struck Egypt during his reign. 'now then ... the gods declared their discontent. The gods [caused] the sky to come in a tempest of r[ain], with darkness in the western region and the sky being unleashed without [cessation, louder than] the cries of the masses, more powerful than [...], [while the rain raged] on the mountains louder than the noise of the cataract which is at Elephantine.'

    Proponents further suggest that the phrase "his Majesty began ...to provide them with silver, with gold, with copper, with oil, and of every bolt [of cloth] that could be desired. Then his majesty made himself comfortable inside the palace" refers to Pharaoh giving Moses the material to build the ark. Thus, Moses becomes a Hyksos leader accepting goods from the Egyptian Pharaoh as part of a deal which would result in the Hyksos leaving Egypt. Manetho alleges that the Theban Pharaoh laid siege to Avaris (the Hyksos capital) and the outcome was a treaty by which the Hyksos agreed to leave Egypt. Manetho also confirms that the Hyksos settled in Jerusalem!

    This puts a rather different slant on the biblical description of "bondage in Egypt". The Hyksos invaded Egypt and held power in northern (lower) Egypt for over a hundred years (according to Manetho) and even sacked Memphis around 1720BC (orthodox dates). They were eventually forced from the country by a rival line of Kings from Thebes. Thus the put upon "slaves" become an invading power and any monuments they built were for their own kingdom. Furthermore, the Hyksos kings placed their names in cartouche and adopted Seth as their pre-eminent god. While his warlike attributes have something in common with the bloodthirsty god of Moses, worship of the Egyptian god Seth could hardly be considered Monotheistic.

    The biblical plagues have often been dismissed as being far too late to name Ahmose I as the Pharaoh of the exodus, but proponents argue that the dates currently accepted for the exodus are too late in any case. Some commentators have argued that there was in fact 585 years from the founding of Solomon's Temple back to the Exodus, giving a date of 1552.
  • waterproofwaterproof Posts: 8,558
    Great thread and read very informative for my bible study
  • beenwizebeenwize Posts: 1,929
    Lol all the info in this thread was also contained in many Discovery channel shows. If thus your first time coming across these theories and u claim to be so well studied then I see why you still lost and delusions.
  • waterproofwaterproof Posts: 8,558
    edited July 2012
    beenwize wrote: »
    Lol all the info in this thread was also contained in many Discovery channel shows. If thus your first time coming across these theories and u claim to be so well studied then I see why you still lost and delusions.


    lol, u mad?? THE ALIENS ARE COMING, THE ALIENS ARE COMING, YAHUSHUA was a alien, lol.

    that's because a student never stops studying and i said it will add to my bible study dumb ass i never said it was the first time coming across it, i got something i can run to with a click of a mouse, dumbass

  • bambubambu Posts: 2,558
    edited July 2012
    HOTEP

    @waterproof.... I will keep dropping info on the historicity of biblical pharaohs in here, despite the presence of beewize ignorance....

    Who was the pharaoh of the Exodus?

    Akhenaten???

    akhnatonbabies.jpg

    Manetho tells the story of Osarseph, a rebellious Egyptian priest, Pharaoh Amenhotep and his son "Ramesses also called Sethos" (of the New Kingdom). Apparently, Osarseph took control of Egypt for thirteen years. He defiled the temples and terrorised the people. Pharaoh fled from Egypt to protect his infant son, but the son returned to Egypt and threw Osarseph out of Egypt. According to Josephus, Manetho believed that Osarseph was Moses, and many have pointed to the similarity between these events and the rule of Akhenaten. Akhenaten certainly rejected the gods and imposed a form of Monotheism.

    However, Josephus also quotes an alternative Egyptian historian, Chaeremon, He also identifies the rebel priest with Moses, but names him 'Tisathen'. He also claims that there was a co-conspirator named Peteseph who he considered to be Joseph! This doesn't sound much like Akhenaten who only really shared power with his wife. In any case, there is plenty of evidence that the beginning of Akhenaten's rule was fairly normal and that he was the direct successor of his father, the Pharaoh Amenhotep III. Furthermore, neither account refers to Smenkhare, or Tutankhamun and the return to Thebes.

    There are also several theories that Akhenaten was the biblical Moses

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR9ulClWJkknzqTZUdaYS6t9krFn7B6hJ-vwGbS63-ct_wqdzYT


    This thesis was promoted by Freud's Moses and Monotheism....

    51oOeCLZN9L._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA278_PIkin4,BottomRight,-63,22_AA300_SH20_OU01_.jpg

    And continue with Ahmed Osman

    The flaws in this research stem from the understanding of Akanaten's rule between1353–1336 BC[2] or 1351–1334 BC(Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt).....

    While Seti I ruled circa 1290–1279 BC (19th Dynasty).... Ramesses I between1292–1290 BC or 1295–1294 BC, 19th Dynasty

    Pa-Ramses ascended to the Egyptain throne with favor from Horemheb, the last pharaoh of the tumultuous Eighteenth dynasty, who appointed the former as his Vizier.

  • waterproofwaterproof Posts: 8,558
    @bambu please do, something told me several years ago not to buy Moses and Akhenaten from amazon.

    The new ruler in egypt who did not Jacob have to be the hysko's
  • bambubambu Posts: 2,558
    @waterproof..... dont waste your money brother.....

    I made the pic of Freud's book hyperlink to a PDF copy of the book.....

    I also hyperlinked Osman's pic to some of his research.....

    HOTEP.....
  • bambubambu Posts: 2,558
    edited August 2012
    Ramesses I

    egyptartdead.gif

    Some commentators have argued that to the story of Osarseph's rebellion should be placed during the co-regency of Ramesses I and Seti I during the New Kingdom. They propose that there was a counter-revolution when Akhenaten died. Horemheb persecuted the followers of Akhenaten and destroyed his monuments. When Horemheb died, Osarseph/Moses returned to Egypt, to lead the rebellion, against Horemheb's successor Ramesses I. Like Horemheb, Ramesses was general in the army and had no royal blood. He ruled for only two years before passing power to his son Seti I.

    If the bible is correct to state that Moses an adopted member of the royal household, then he may have had a tenuous claim to the throne. The fact that Akhenaten has been written out of Egyptian history (he is notably absent from the kings lists written during the reigns of Seti I and Ramesses II) seems consistent with this view, but little else from the reign of Ramesses I would support this tale which does seem rather unlikley. The story is probably based almost entirely on the view that Akhenaten was the first known monotheist, but that view is to simplify both the theology of Akhenaten and to stretch the facts to their limit as no evidence for any counter rebellion.
  • bambubambu Posts: 2,558
    Tuthmosis III

    7thutmose3_atef-med.jpg

    Menkheperre Tuthmosis III ascended to the Egyptian throne as Pharaoh in 1504 B.C. Tuthmosis III was short, standing only just over 168 cm (five feet) tall, as his mummy tells us (mummy). Legend presents Tuthmosis as born of peasant race, the son of a slave-woman in the Pharaoh's harem. Thutmosis is also called the Napoleon of ancient Egypt because of his military conquests.

    For twenty years, his stepmother/aunt, Queen Pharaoh Makare Hatshepsut, served as his co-regent. He inherited a thousand year old civilization of such stability which would continue for many centuries more. No other civilization has even come close to the grandeur and stability as has the Egyptian civilization.

    While his predecessor, the only female pharaoh in history, Hatshepsut, made a formidable name in history by building temples and amassing great wealth, Tuthmosis made his name by extending the geographical boundaries of his beloved land.

    In 1500 B.C. Thutmosis III documents a rebellion of Canaanite Kings who attempt to overthrow Egyptian rule. The confederation of rebels is led by the city state of Megiddo (Armageddon). Pharaoh Thutmosis besieges Megiddo for seven months, then wins the decisive battle of Qinnah Brook (wasdi Lajjun). According to the report of Thutmosis III, the Canaanites are forced to yield 924 chariots and 207,300 kur of wheat to the Egyptians. This is the earliest reported battle in history.

    Tuthmosis also began immediately to crush a revolt in the northeastern section of his empire, Kadesh, a city-state in Syria, led by the King Saustatar of Mitanni. Tuthmosis army consisted of the Nubian Militia, the greatest tactical innovation, followed by the infantry, which consisted mainly of spearmen.

    n07.jpg


    ". . . the main sources of the 18th dynasty were Nubian and Libyan, depicted black and yellow, but not red of the Egyptians. This black strain seems to have come through the Tao I and II ancestry".---- W.M. Flinders Petrie, The Making of Egypt, 1939, p. 155

    2tuthmoseiii.jpg
  • bambubambu Posts: 2,558
    Seti II ?????

    sety_i_triumph.jpg

    A triumphal scene of Sety I slaying enemy prisoners.

    The route chosen by the escaping Israelites, from Piramesse to Tjeku (biblical Succoth: Exodus 12:37) and eastwards, was precisely the same that was used by two escaping slaves of the late 13th century BC, during the reign of Seti II as reported in Papyrus Anastasi V.

    The papyrus describes the escape of runaway slaves during the reign of Seti II (New Kingdom). It is interesting to note that their escape route mirrors that of the fleeing Israelites during the Exodus from Egypt (which is sometimes ascribed to the reign of Ramesses II).
    egyptianhittiteempires1300bce.jpg
    The Egyptian and Hittite Empires during the reign of Sety I
  • bambubambu Posts: 2,558
    beenwize wrote: »
    Lol all the info in this thread was also contained in many Discovery channel shows. If thus your first time coming across these theories and u claim to be so well studied then I see why you still lost and delusions.

    Hoe ass nigga..........
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