15 Insane Theories About Movies And Television That Will Blow Your Mind

ocelotocelot Posts: 9,760 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited February 2014 in The Forum of Fame
I hope you're sitting down for this...

1. The "Aladdin" Is Set In The Future Theory
There's a scene in "Aladdin" where Genie calls Aladdin's clothes "so 3rd century." However, as we all know, the Genie was locked inside a lamp for the past 10,000 years, meaning that there is no way he could have known what the 3rd century was like.

This means that "Aladdin" actually takes place in the FUTURE, in at least 10,300 AD. The movie itself is set in a post-apocalyptic wasteland, one where only some Arabic culture has survived. The things called "magic" are actually just some of the technological marvels left behind by the previous civilization. These include flying carpets and genetically engineered parrots which can comprehend human speech instead of just mimicking it.

How else could the Genie do impressions of ancient, long-dead celebrities like Groucho Marx, Jack Nicholson, etc?

2. The "Rugrats" Never Happened Theory
None of the babies in "Rugrats" actually exist, but they are all instead figments of Angelica's imagination, as result of her parent's negligence.

Chuckie died with his mother, which explains how much of a nervous wreck his father is.
Tommy was a stillborn baby, which explains why his father, Stu, was always in the basement making toys for the son he never had.
Finally, the DeVilles had an abortion. To compensate for not knowing the sex of the baby, Angelica invented twins in her head, one boy, one girl.

3. The Codename: James Bond Theory

Bond is not just one person. "James Bond" is as much a codename as "007." This makes sense, and allows several actors to play the James Bond.

4. Rebecca Black's "Friday"-JFK Theory
"Friday" is about the JFK assassination. The man driving the car JFK was in was named Samuel Kickin (Kickin in the front seat, sittin in the back seat...). The assassination occurred on a Friday, and after JFK was shot the secret service told Jackie Kennedy to "get down" (got to get down on Friday). The cold war and the spread of Communism are referenced (everybody's Russian).

Finally, instead of eating a breakfast of eggs and sausage that morning, JFK opted for a bowl of Bran Flakes (got to have my bowl- got to have cereal). The following Monday, JFK was due to sign a law that provided bus transportation to all students (got to catch my bus...)
5. The Spongebob Mutant Theory
Spongebob and all his friends are the product radiation from atomic testing during the '40s and '50s on the Bikini Atoll. They live underneath the area, explaining the name "Bikini Bottom."
LUClENsoul rattlerMorganFreemanKing


  • ocelotocelot Posts: 9,760 ✭✭✭✭✭
    6. The Pokemon "War In Kanto" Theory

    7. The Two Inspector Gadgets Theory
    There are actually two Inspector Gadgets. The first was long thought to be dead, so a second was built, one with the same dog, niece, life. When the first returns from being presumably dead and sees he has been replaced, he snaps. He vows to destroy the man who took his place and assumes a new identity... Dr. Claw.

    8. The "Samuari Jack"-"Powerpuff Girls" Shared Universe Theory
    "Samurai Jack" takes place in a post-apocalyptic Townsville.

    9. The All Of Quentin Tarantino's Films Take Place In The Same Universe Theory
    It's well known that all of Tarantino's films take place in the same universe - this is established by the fact that Mr. Blonde and Vince Vega are brothers, everybody smokes Red Apple cigarettes, Mr. White worked with Alabama from True Romance, etc.

    As it turns out, Donny Donowitz, 'The Bear Jew', is the father of movie producer Lee Donowitz from True Romance - which means that, in Tarantino's universe, everybody grew up learning about how a bunch of commando Jews machine gunned Hitler to death in a burning movie theater, as opposed to quietly killing himself in a bunker.

    Because World War 2 ended in a movie theater, everybody lends greater significance to pop culture, hence why seemingly everybody has Abed-level knowledge of movies and TV. Likewise, because America won World War 2 in one concentrated act of hyperviolent slaughter, Americans as a whole are more desensitized to that sort of thing. Hence why Butch is unfazed by killing two people, Mr. White and Mr. Pink take a pragmatic approach to killing in their line of work, Esmerelda the cab driver is obsessed with death, etc.

    You can extrapolate this further when you realize that Tarantino's movies are technically two universes - he's gone on record as saying that Kill Bill and From Dusk 'Til Dawn take place in a 'movie movie universe'; that is, they're movies that characters from the Pulp Fiction, Reservoir Dogs, True Romance, and Death Proof universe would go to see in theaters. (Kill Bill, after all, is basically Fox Force Five, right on down to Mia Wallace playing the title role.)

    What immediately springs to mind about Kill Bill and From Dusk 'Til Dawn? That they're crazy violent, even by Tarantino standards. These are the movies produced in a world where America's crowning victory was locking a bunch of people in a movie theater and blowing it to bits - and keep in mind, Lee Donowitz, son of one of the people on the suicide mission to kill Hitler, is a very successful movie producer.

    Basically, it turns every Tarantino movie into alternate reality sci fi.

    10. The "Ferris Bueller"-"Fight Club" Theory
    One day while he's lying sick in bed, Cameron lets "Ferris" steal his father's car and take the day off, and as Cameron wanders around the city, all of his interactions with Ferris and Sloane, and all the impossible hijinks, are all just played out in his head. This is part of the reason why the "three" characters can see so much of Chicago in less than one day -- Cameron is alone, just imagining it all.

    Ferris Bueller, the person, is just a figment of Cameron’s imagination, like Tyler Durden, and Sloane is the girl Cameron secretly loves.
  • TrueGodHSTrueGodHS Posts: 2,670 ✭✭✭✭
    Some of these could make sense...... considering Hollywood, you never know lol
  • ocelotocelot Posts: 9,760 ✭✭✭✭✭
    11. The "Forrest Gump" Gump Jr. Theory

    Forrest never had a son. Jenny just took advantage after learning how rich he became from his shrimp business.

    12. The "Captain Planet" And "Magic Schoolbus" Are Actually The Same Show Theory

    13. The Super Mario Bros 3 Never Happened Theory

    14. The "Back To The Future" Suicidal Doc Theory
    Doc is suicidal during the scene where they test the time machine. Not only has he never tested the machine, but he says that most of his inventions have been failures.

    Because of this he not only drives the Delorian towards himself, but grabs onto Marty so he cannot run away.

    If his invention failed, they would have both died. Which is exactly what Doc wanted.

    15. The "Fresh Prince" Will Is Dead Theory
    Will actually died in the fight on the basketball court in West Philly.

    The taxi driver is actually God, who drives a "rare" cab. He takes Will to heaven, where he works out all his issues with his wealthy Aunt and Uncle.

    Will only sees his mother and father on special occasions, because that's when they come to visit his grave.
  • focusfocus The #1 Nigga, I Don't Need No Hype. Posts: 5,066 ✭✭✭✭✭
    This whole thread been wack. The only interesting one is the Captain Planet/Magic School Bus shit, and thats just mostly kinda funny.

    The Tarantino same universe shit is widely known like they said, but I guess the details they came up with are kinda cool.
  • ocelotocelot Posts: 9,760 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Got more

    The Wire and The X-Files Exist in the Same Universe

    It's hard to believe that while a gritty drug war rages in Baltimore, Md. (as seen in The Wire), the government is devoting considerable resources to planning a secret alien invasion (as seen in The X-Files). And yet, if you look at the cold, hard facts, that's exactly what's going on in those shows.

    It all comes down to this dude:

    Detective John Munch is best known as a character in the interminable Law & Order franchise, but he first appeared on a different cop show called Homicide: Life on the Street. Homicide was based on a book by David Simon and inspired by many of the same people and events Simon would later use as the basis for HBO's The Wire. In the last season of The Wire, Simon confirmed the connection between the shows by having Detective Munch make a short appearance.

    But that's not all: Before Homicide was canceled, the show crossed over with The X-Files in an episode where the Lone Gunmen, the conspiracy theorists who occasionally assist Mulder and Scully, uncover a government plot to test an experimental nerve gas in Baltimore. The Gunmen try to warn the authorities, but Detective Munch doesn't buy any of that conspiracy crap and locks them up. This isn't some inconsequential little cameo, by the way -- the whole episode is framed by Munch interrogating the Lone Gunmen.

    The implications are vast: What other toxic agents has the government been secretly testing in Baltimore, a city that The Wire paints as crippled by drug use? Could this explain why they let Sgt. Colvin get away with his "Hamsterdam" experiment for so long in Season 3? The massive coverup at the end of Season 5 had to be a piece of cake to a government that is already hiding the existence of everything from aliens to "Super Soldiers." Also, this would explain why the characters in The Wire always have such a hard time getting the Feds to cooperate with their drug investigations -- they have much, much bigger fish to fry. Like, galaxy big.

    We could take this even further if we took into consideration the fact that Homicide: Life on the Street can also be linked to St. Elsewhere, of all things, through two characters who appeared on both shows. St. Elsewhere famously ended when the whole show was revealed to take place in the imagination of an autistic child -- and, by extension, so would The X-Files and The Wire.

    In fact, according to Dwayne McDuffie's Grand Unification Theory, "The last five minutes of St. Elsewhere is the only television show, ever. Everything else is a daydream."

  • RXMaskedRXMasked Posts: 292 ✭✭✭
    The Rugrats theory was actually made up by somebody on either 4chan or ebaums. IDK all the sites look a like lol
  • CoolJoeCoolJoe Posts: 6,054 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The James Bond one seems the most plausible.
    StoneColdMikeyAnti_matterYoung Stefnillerthekid
  • KNiGHTSKNiGHTS Mr. Fifth Letter Your ConsciencePosts: 3,737 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 2012
    Jenny was a smutbucket, so the Gump theory is plausible.

    Fresh Prince is loosely based on one of the creators' lives, so no dice.

    Back to the Future makes sense. If everything you do ends in failure, as a man of science, why stake your life on a statistically probable outcome of death unless you wanted to die?

    Pokemon makes sense.

    Inspector Gadget would be awesome, but it's superficial bullshit.

    Tarantino's the GAWD. I knew about Pulp Fiction and Reservoir Dogs being connected, but all of his films? Damn.
  • ocelotocelot Posts: 9,760 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The Beuller theory is unlikely but I wouldn't be shocked...
  • wmj710wmj710 Posts: 3,461 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I actually thought the James bond one was common knowledge. Some of these are stretching though, like the rug rats and fresh prince one.
    Already Home_17StoneColdMikeySour-Cream
  • ocelotocelot Posts: 9,760 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Ghostbusters Crossing the Streams
    The Theory: The Ghostbusters die after crossing the streams, and the scene where they are celebrated by the city is the last piece of glory they receive before passing on.

    Why it’s Possible: Doesn’t Egon say more than once “never” to cross the streams? And if you need evidence try Ghostbusters 2. Think about it. Ghostbusters 2 could very well have taken place in purgatory, repeating the events of the first movie with certain details changed, explaining why no one seems to remember the Stay Puft Marshmallow man attacking New York in the first movie. It’s just very hard to believe that when Egon says never to do something that all of a sudden he’s off the hook? Isn’t that a little too easy?
    Batman (1989 one)
    The Theory: The Joker didn’t actually kill Batman’s parents, and Batman only sees the face of his parent’s killer in every criminal he sees.

    Why It’s Possible: This is a common part of Batman’s psyche in the comic books and Burton did a pretty good job of it in the movie. Also, in the movie young Bruce doesn’t REALLY see the murder. Also, The Joker killing his parents isn’t really essential to the plot of the movie if you’re going by the fact that Batman is a hero and kills criminals. He’s not supposed to have vendettas.

  • Lou_CypherLou_Cypher Louis For Mod 2016 AlaskaPosts: 32,203 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I thought Tarantino confirmed all his movies are in the same universe?
  • lighthearted26lighthearted26 Posts: 1,362 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Lmao why the heart ring was lame? And I read the rugrats theory before. Talk about taking the fun out of a show.
  • themadlionsfanthemadlionsfan Posts: 8,076 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I don't even remember what the heart ring was.....that alone makes it lame.....that muthafucka from Kenya was gangsta wit it though
    Young StefSour-Creamonetoughmiracledakidfrankie
  • nawledge_godnawledge_god KRS-Juan Chiraq RefugeePosts: 4,024 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Some Of These Are Grasping At Straws Some Were Entertaining
  • Anti_matterAnti_matter Posts: 1,364 ✭✭✭✭
    some of Spike Lee's films take place in the same universe.

    the two cops who killed Radio Raheem also appear in Clockers and Jungle Fever

    in Inside Man, the detectives order pizza from Sal's pizzeria.

    in Clockers, Spike lee's character is seen drinking Da Bomb malt liquor, the same brand that is advertised in Bamboozled.

    TrillaaaaaaMeta_ConsciousYoung Stefonetoughmiracle
  • TrueGodHSTrueGodHS Posts: 2,670 ✭✭✭✭
    ^^ Never paid attention to Spike's films to even notice that
    Meta_Consciousloch121DMTxTHCalmighty breeze
This discussion has been closed.