Are Americans too hard on themsleves?

In a general observation I have often noticed that we tend to be extremely critical of our governments foreign policy. With the exception of criticizing their own governments handling of domestic issues very rarely if ever do I see other nations showing sympathy to anyone other then their own. We Americans are almost a complete opposite, we place high priority for the rights of other more than we do for our own in this country. Anyone to tend to notice this?

Replies

  • MzKBMzKB Posts: 2,917
    Yes, the US is the "world" police! So they have to have a hand or say on everything that has nothing to do with them.
    Our government is more helpful to foreigners than it is for its own people. We have a counter productice government when it comes to helping its own citizens.
  • Mister B.Mister B. Posts: 7,459
    Fuck no.

    These kids, if anything, aren't hard enough. They are deluded to think they are entitled to anything other than oxygen past 18. Shit's sad, cause they are in for rude-ass awakenings after they take off that HS graduation robe and tassel and have to face the REAL world that awaits them.
  • jayvon32jayvon32 Posts: 580
    Hate to shatter many some of you all misconception about America, but i have to do it in least one area....

    Does the U.S. Produce Too Many Scientists?



    American science education lags behind that of many other nations, right? So why does it produce so many talented young researchers who cannot find a job in their chosen field of study?

    For years, Americans have heard blue-ribbon commissions and major industrialists bemoan a shortage of scientists caused by an inadequate education system. A lack of high-tech talent, these critics warn, so threatens the nation’s continued competitiveness that the U.S. must drastically upgrade its K-12 science and math education and import large numbers of technically trained foreigners by promptly raising the current limit on the number of skilled foreigners allowed to enter the country to work in private industry. “We face a critical shortfall of skilled scientists and engineers who can develop new breakthrough technologies,” Microsoft chairman Bill Gates testified to Congress in March 2008.

    But many less publicized Americans, including prominent labor economists, disagree. “There is no scientist shortage,” says Harvard University economist Richard Freeman, a leading expert on the academic labor force. The great lack in the American scientific labor market, he and other observers argue, is not top-flight technical talent but attractive career opportunities for the approximately 30,000 scientists and engineers—about 18,000 of them American citizens—who earn PhDs in the U.S. each year

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=does-the-us-produce-too-m
  • kaikai Posts: 20,850
    ^^^you are talking about college and university

    america has some of the best colleges and univeristies in the world, but their public elementary and secondary schools suck ass for the most part when compared to other countries

    and of those 18,000 american citizens, i'd bet you a lot of them are second generation children of immigrants
  • kai_valya wrote: »
    in what way is america hard on itsel? y'all excel in nothing but having the fattest people, the most folks in jail, the most murders, and the most spending on war, yet still think you're the shit for some reason

    I think people may have misunderstood my post. You included. Despite geographic boundaries Americans (citizens) seem to sympathize the with the condition of others especially when their suffering is a direct result of American foreign policy. There are countless Americans who sympathized with the Vietnamese people during the Vietnam War. Countless Americans who sympathize with the Palestinians. Countless Americans who sympathized with Iraqi's during the invasion. All these things are a result of American foreign policy, whether it be justified or not. My question is- do other people in other countries show the same sympathy towards foreigners whom have suffered as a direct result of their government's foreign policy? As an example-What is the likely-hood of seeing a Chinese person sympathize with a Taiwanese because of acts of aggression imposed by Chinese government?

  • jayvon32jayvon32 Posts: 580
    kai_valya wrote: »
    ^^^you are talking about college and university

    america has some of the best colleges and univeristies in the world, but their public elementary and secondary schools suck ass for the most part when compared to other countries

    and of those 18,000 american citizens, i'd bet you a lot of them are second generation children of immigrants

    Incorrect..the article states these are from U.S born citizens but even if they are 2nd generation immigrant kids, they still go to the same school system decried from its inferiority to the educational system around the world, so that argument is invalid

    Based on the K-12 Trends in International Math and Science Study tests, the U.S. has more high-scoring kids than any other country, rivaling Japan and Korea in math, of all subjects.


  • Americas motto

    ”we're not perfect but at least we're not as bad as (insert country)”

    So much hypocrisy.
  • kaikai Posts: 20,850
    jayvon32 wrote: »
    kai_valya wrote: »
    ^^^you are talking about college and university

    america has some of the best colleges and univeristies in the world, but their public elementary and secondary schools suck ass for the most part when compared to other countries

    and of those 18,000 american citizens, i'd bet you a lot of them are second generation children of immigrants

    Incorrect..the article states these are from U.S born citizens but even if they are 2nd generation immigrant kids, they still go to the same school system decried from its inferiority to the educational system around the world, so that argument is invalid

    Based on the K-12 Trends in International Math and Science Study tests, the U.S. has more high-scoring kids than any other country, rivaling Japan and Korea in math, of all subjects.


    @ the bolded, that's where immigrants are different, we don't just let the schools teach our kids. when i was younger, every summer my uncle would teach us math for the upcoming school year and my mother did languages and sciences with us. majority of things, i had already learned before i was taught them in school

    and as to the rest of your post, i'd like to see that, cuz everything i've ever read, the US was even trailing countries like estonia and mexico
  • jayvon32jayvon32 Posts: 580
    kai_valya wrote: »
    jayvon32 wrote: »
    kai_valya wrote: »
    ^^^you are talking about college and university

    america has some of the best colleges and univeristies in the world, but their public elementary and secondary schools suck ass for the most part when compared to other countries

    and of those 18,000 american citizens, i'd bet you a lot of them are second generation children of immigrants

    Incorrect..the article states these are from U.S born citizens but even if they are 2nd generation immigrant kids, they still go to the same school system decried from its inferiority to the educational system around the world, so that argument is invalid

    Based on the K-12 Trends in International Math and Science Study tests, the U.S. has more high-scoring kids than any other country, rivaling Japan and Korea in math, of all subjects.


    @ the bolded, that's where immigrants are different, we don't just let the schools teach our kids. when i was younger, every summer my uncle would teach us math for the upcoming school year and my mother did languages and sciences with us. majority of things, i had already learned before i was taught them in school

    and as to the rest of your post, i'd like to see that, cuz everything i've ever read, the US was even trailing countries like estonia and mexico

    read the link i posted and it will point you to the source of my information. Going back to this bolded point you just brought. That is not a knock against our system, that is more or less providing evidence as to how parents and family involvement is needed for a kid to succeed in school, which i wholeheartedly agree.

    My uncle has a PhD, my auntie has a master, cousin a Master, and myself a bachelor working towards my master soon. My family didnt go to the best schools growing up but they made it work.
  • luke1733luke1733 Posts: 554
    depending on how you look at it, it can be good sometime; but we pay a price for it. We damn sure brag on ourselves enough too when we speak on we might not be perfect but we the best
  • Wild SelfWild Self Posts: 4,219
    Fuck no.

    These kids, if anything, aren't hard enough. They are deluded to think they are entitled to anything other than oxygen past 18. Shit's sad, cause they are in for rude-ass awakenings after they take off that HS graduation robe and tassel and have to face the REAL world that awaits them.

    Problem is, that the world is becoming a little too easy in accessible information, especially in today's technological world. Blame the parents that raised them no better.
  • 32DaysOfInfiniti32DaysOfInfiniti Posts: 3,011
    edited February 2013
    The pressure to be somebody is the worst in america... We have such high standards that we cant see real life lived by the majority of the world without thinking it is an atrocity and trying to intervene with "diplomacy".

    Suicide is such a problem here because the media builds a huge model for success that is impossible for 99% of men to reach, which leads to tons of dissapointed women (Look at divorce rates..)

    Stress caused cancer is a very American thing
  • blakfyahkingblakfyahking Posts: 13,914
    kai is obviously a jihadist who is not a fan of America

    @kai

    I can keep them from waterboarding you if you are willing give up some of that goodyhole

    /I think that is a reasonable exchange :(
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