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Colin Kaepernick refuses “to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses Black people”...

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Replies

  • texas409texas409 Posts: 20,837 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 1
    darkskinned niggas always cooning out for the white mans approval and he a Que too. smfh
    Already Home_17thereactionatorR0mpAlpha_Ambition soul rattlerineedpussyMallyGUndefeatableBroddie
  • ShizlanskyShizlansky Posts: 35,075 ✭✭✭✭✭
    aneed123 wrote: »
    they threw money at them and they sold out... a price was put on their protest... niggas always put money over the cause. mlk and Rosa parks rollin round in their graves

    Do you consider yourself a sell out for watching the games?
    (Really though?)
    dnyce215
  • The Lonious MonkThe Lonious Monk Man with No Fucks Given Posts: 26,236 ✭✭✭✭✭
    D. Morgan wrote: »
    I'm confused. Do ya'll think people should be protesting for the sake of protesting? I'm not saying whether he's right or wrong, but if he was protesting because he wanted to see some action and he think the NFL has taken an action that will allow him to do some real good for the cause, how is he wrong to stop kneeling. Kneeling ain't doing shit. Taking millions of dollars from the NFL to help organizations that are out there doing real work just might.

    Not even going to go into full detail. The NFL hasn't taken any actions yet actually.

    Also they set up a 12 person committee for control of the distribution of the money.

    The committee breakdown is 5 players, 5 owners or representative of the owner and 2 people from the league office. We all know that the owners and league office are the same. So the players don't even have the majority say so in how and what organizations the money should go to.

    Nothing was accomplished if you give up control of the dollars for what you protested for.

    That nigga didn't kneel by the way he raised his fist.

    I hear you, but he obviously feels they are moving forward. If he's wrong, there's nothing stopping him from resuming his protests.
    Niggas think that they own things and man sits high upon thrones
    But when you die, tell me what the fuck you own.
    When your skin, flesh, and bones find a permanent home
    as food for worms or fossils trapped in stone. - Rza in "What's Going On?"

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  • aneed123aneed123 Posts: 23,726 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Shizlansky wrote: »
    aneed123 wrote: »
    they threw money at them and they sold out... a price was put on their protest... niggas always put money over the cause. mlk and Rosa parks rollin round in their graves

    Do you consider yourself a sell out for watching the games?

    yes when i do. ive cut back. i do t go to any sports bars to watch nfl nor do i watch like i used to. i check giant scores from time to time. now does that discredit what i said? dem niggas undermined kaps protest and took money to shut up. and niggas dedending that shit. no nigga
    AggieLean.atribecalledgabiChi Snow
  • ShizlanskyShizlansky Posts: 35,075 ✭✭✭✭✭
    http://www.latimes.com/sports/chargers/la-sp-okung-players-coalition-20171201-story.html
    Chargers' Russell Okung on his break with the Players Coalition: 'This goes beyond dollars and cents'

    Chargers tackle Russell Okung, who has emerged as one of the leaders among NFL players pushing for social change, spoke Friday about why he’s left the Players Coalition, the group credited with receiving financial backing from the NFL’s owners to address issues of racial injustice.

    Earlier this week the group, led by Philadelphia’s Malcolm Jenkins and retired player Anquan Boldin, agreed to a plan that would inject $89 million over seven years to multiple charities, including the United Negro College Fund, according to reports.

    Soon after the deal was reported, San Francisco’s Eric Reid, Miami’s Michael Thomas and Okung posted messages on Twitter noting they were no longer associated with the coalition.

    “I think, in order to understand what we’d do differently, you have to understand the full political and economic power of the league. When they engage us in ways we can kind of bring about change, that was my thinking — that we should be able to operate on full capacity on multiple levels,” Okung said Friday. “This goes beyond dollars and cents. It goes beyond just allocating funds from other initiatives that are just as important. It’s going to take a real commitment of us, leveraging the platform of the players and empowering us to really talk about these issues, police engagement and brutality.

    “That’s just something, I feel, that’s been made into a farce.”

    Okung, who has been raising a fist during the national anthem, said he’ll continue demonstrating Sunday.

    “We are in a sport where we have people of color,” Okung said. “Men of color have prominent roles in this league as players. Now is a pivotal time to be able to leverage that correctly.”


    The NFL has been immersed in controversy since former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick began protesting last season by kneeling during the playing of the national anthem because of police brutality.

    Kaepernick’s role with the Players Coalition — or lack thereof — has been cited as part of the reason the group has fractured.

    “I think you’ve got to keep in mind who started this whole thing, who sort of put himself on the line. There’s definitely some respect there. I believe this is the same league who has effectively blackballed him,” Okung said. “So when you’re dealing with a certain group of people, this entity as a league — you try to keep in mind, is this a reparation, or just $89 million?

    “Reparation extends beyond just dollars and cents, in real change in policy and lobbying. I think that should be more at the forefront of what we’re trying to accomplish here.”

    I understand all this but what does the quote below has to do with the NFL? Are they expecting them change policy for police?

    “Reparation extends beyond just dollars and cents, in real change in policy and lobbying. I think that should be more at the forefront of what we’re trying to accomplish here.”
    (Really though?)
  • Already Home_17Already Home_17 Posts: 14,564 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Shizlansky wrote: »
    http://www.latimes.com/sports/chargers/la-sp-okung-players-coalition-20171201-story.html
    Chargers' Russell Okung on his break with the Players Coalition: 'This goes beyond dollars and cents'

    Chargers tackle Russell Okung, who has emerged as one of the leaders among NFL players pushing for social change, spoke Friday about why he’s left the Players Coalition, the group credited with receiving financial backing from the NFL’s owners to address issues of racial injustice.

    Earlier this week the group, led by Philadelphia’s Malcolm Jenkins and retired player Anquan Boldin, agreed to a plan that would inject $89 million over seven years to multiple charities, including the United Negro College Fund, according to reports.

    Soon after the deal was reported, San Francisco’s Eric Reid, Miami’s Michael Thomas and Okung posted messages on Twitter noting they were no longer associated with the coalition.

    “I think, in order to understand what we’d do differently, you have to understand the full political and economic power of the league. When they engage us in ways we can kind of bring about change, that was my thinking — that we should be able to operate on full capacity on multiple levels,” Okung said Friday. “This goes beyond dollars and cents. It goes beyond just allocating funds from other initiatives that are just as important. It’s going to take a real commitment of us, leveraging the platform of the players and empowering us to really talk about these issues, police engagement and brutality.

    “That’s just something, I feel, that’s been made into a farce.”

    Okung, who has been raising a fist during the national anthem, said he’ll continue demonstrating Sunday.

    “We are in a sport where we have people of color,” Okung said. “Men of color have prominent roles in this league as players. Now is a pivotal time to be able to leverage that correctly.”


    The NFL has been immersed in controversy since former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick began protesting last season by kneeling during the playing of the national anthem because of police brutality.

    Kaepernick’s role with the Players Coalition — or lack thereof — has been cited as part of the reason the group has fractured.

    “I think you’ve got to keep in mind who started this whole thing, who sort of put himself on the line. There’s definitely some respect there. I believe this is the same league who has effectively blackballed him,” Okung said. “So when you’re dealing with a certain group of people, this entity as a league — you try to keep in mind, is this a reparation, or just $89 million?

    “Reparation extends beyond just dollars and cents, in real change in policy and lobbying. I think that should be more at the forefront of what we’re trying to accomplish here.”

    I understand all this but what does the quote below has to do with the NFL? Are they expecting them change policy for police?

    “Reparation extends beyond just dollars and cents, in real change in policy and lobbying. I think that should be more at the forefront of what we’re trying to accomplish here.”

    These are the same owners that tell your hometowns “we want a brand new billion dollar stadium, and your citizens are gonna pay for it.
    we’re gonna host events in your city, and you’re gonna pay us to do it.
    and the ticket revenue that’s grossed? we keeping all that.”

    They tell the military “oh you want us to honor your service? ante up”

    They can pretty much do whatever they want.

    So simply calling out police brutality and crooked police forces in the town in which their team is located shouldn’t be THAT much of a hassle.

    Asking for police reform and throwing money in that direction isn’t asking for too much.

    I don’t have all the answers, but I refuse to believe nothing more could be done on behalf of the owners.

    Jenkins is certainly looking funny in the light, but $89 million is a lot of dough. i hope they put it to good use, and not lose sight of what this protest was all about in the first place
    Chi Snow
  • Inglewood_BInglewood_B Woodz of Inglez Posts: 12,231 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2
    NFL don’t need to do anything but get the fuck outta the way
    Quick wit the hands... Readdyyyyyy
    atribecalledgabiMister B.Chi Snow
  • marc123marc123 Posts: 16,937 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2
    NFL don’t need to do anything but get the fuck outta the way

    Yea I don't even understand what the money had to with anything. Niggas talkin bout police brutality and getting rid of racist policies and they wrote a fuckin check......where's the correlation? Smh

    There is none.

    How do super rich ppl solve problems. They throw money at it. What else did ppl expect them do. I dont understand why there is a great debate. As long as the money goes to good use, im cool w it.......now asking the players to stop kneeling in return for the money is bullshit. gtfoh w that.
    atribecalledgabibossdon201Inglewood_BChi Snow
  • The Lonious MonkThe Lonious Monk Man with No Fucks Given Posts: 26,236 ✭✭✭✭✭
    NFL don’t need to do anything but get the fuck outta the way

    Yea I don't even understand what the money had to with anything. Niggas talkin bout police brutality and getting rid of racist policies and they wrote a fuckin check......where's the correlation? Smh

    I haven't paid that much attention, but Jenkins made it seem like the money would be going to social justice programs meant to directly address the problems being protested. I could be wrong. Fuck it it doesn't matter anymore.
    Niggas think that they own things and man sits high upon thrones
    But when you die, tell me what the fuck you own.
    When your skin, flesh, and bones find a permanent home
    as food for worms or fossils trapped in stone. - Rza in "What's Going On?"

    m63Y62.gif
  • stringer bellstringer bell Posts: 26,142 ✭✭✭✭✭
    https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/news/malcolm-jenkins-im-not-a-sellout-nfl-protests-were-never-about-the-money/
    Malcolm Jenkins: I'm not a sellout; NFL protests were 'never about the money'
    The Eagles safety pens an open letter to critics of the Players Coalition

    As the NFL Players Coalition celebrates an $89 million partnership with the NFL but endures public backlash from some of its former members, its leader wants you to know that his efforts to shed light on the issues raised by hundreds of protesting players were never about getting the league's money.

    In an open letter issued to CBSSports.com and other media, Philadelphia Eagles safety and unofficial Players Coalition spokesman Malcolm Jenkins has detailed the roots of his discussions with the NFL, saying that it's "insulting" to hear others call him a "sellout."

    The San Francisco 49ers' Eric Reid is among several notable players who have openly criticized Jenkins' actions on behalf of the Coalition, a group of about 40 players that now identifies as a nonprofit, suggesting that Jenkins did not properly communicate with most of those players when agreeing to the NFL's reported seven-year, $89 million donation plan -- a deal that has the league set to contribute more money to charities related to recent national anthem demonstrations than even prominent NFL campaigns like Salute to Service.

    But Jenkins, whose community meetings with commissioner Roger Goodell and local law enforcement coincided with his own anthem demonstrations, says he's only ever been motivated by the very reasons he protested -- to promote racial equality and reform in the education, criminal justice and law enforcement systems. Once forced to defend his patriotism as a result of his peaceful protests during pregame anthems, Jenkins is now tasked with convincing his fellow players that he didn't "sell out" as the Coalition's leader.
    Two of Jenkins' Eagles teammates, Torrey Smith and Rodney McLeod, have since echoed the safety's words, posting on Twitter Sunday that Jenkins and others "have been doing things for black communities long before" former 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick began kneeling during anthems to protest police brutality in 2016.
    vqllc3.jpg

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    “Every generation has its own evil. But our evil is a different kind of evil — our systems are evil.” - Rev. Nicholas Richards
    dnyce215Chi Snow
  • stringer bellstringer bell Posts: 26,142 ✭✭✭✭✭
    His open letter regarding the situation reads as follows:

    It has been my goal for the past two years to raise awareness about some important social injustices that plague our country. The PEOPLE who have been unjustly disenfranchised by our criminal justice system and the PEOPLE who daily fight for them always have, and always will be, the inspiration and focus of my efforts. I'm proud of what my peers and I have been able to accomplish by using the platform we have these last two years. I'm proud to be part of a group of men who are standing up because we can help others. I'm proud of the men who may now disagree with me and our direction, but still played a significant role in getting results through our actions.

    We will not be deterred from fighting for justice. There are many players across the league who have joined these efforts toward new legislation, reestablishing trust with our police and helping to create educational and economic opportunities in our communities. I welcome anyone who wants to join us.

    The real work began in the summer of 2016, after many of us saw what transpired around Alton Sterling, Philando Castile and others. We realized that we needed to get involved for those men and the many others before them and those who would come later. A lot of work began to educate ourselves on the inner workings of the criminal justice system. When the protests began that fall, it sparked conversation and we all realized our unique platform to raise awareness and get people talking about the issues. It grew from there – guys saw that they had an opportunity to make a difference, and Anquan Boldin rallied a group of us to go to Capitol Hill in November 2016. It kept growing – with a large group of NFL players and others joining the effort.

    The stories we have heard and the people we have met these last couple of years keep us going. The children growing up in our cities who don't get the educations they need or deserve, the inherent discrimination we have seen in our criminal justice system that locks up more black bodies in 2017 than were forced into slavery in the pre-Civil War era, the people who believe their lives don't matter when they watch time and again their friends, family and neighbors being shot in the street. Did you know that you can be arrested and held in jail, sometimes for months, without a conviction? Did you know children are being given life without parole for crimes that don't fit the punishment?

    Many of us – Doug Baldwin, Chris Long, Torrey Smith, Anquan Boldin, Rodney McLeod and others – have spent time in cities and towns talking with these people about these issues and pushing these legislators to right these wrongs. What we've learned is that this is not a Democrat or a Republican issue. It's an American issue – and an American problem. That is why we are moving forward with our efforts in the Coalition, to drive forward initiatives, campaigns and advocacy efforts to force legislators to make this a priority.

    I wholeheartedly support and respect those who want to continue to protest. My hope and my focus now will be on getting the media coverage and attention on the tragedies we need to fix – those in our juvenile justice system, unjust bail policies, mass incarceration of young black men in this country and lack of employment opportunities in low-income communities – not whether I'm raising a fist before taking the field.

    I want to thank the organizations who have helped the Players Coalition to date – the Fair Punishment Project, the ACLU, Center for American Progress, Community Legal Services, the Page 2 of 2 12/3/2017 Campaign for the Fair Sentencing of Youth, our city police departments and the countless grass roots organizations and public defenders we've had the opportunity to get to know.

    I also appreciate the fans who have supported our fight for equality and justice. I am especially appreciative for people like Stan Van Gundy who lent his support and helped pave the way to expand this movement to include the NBA.

    What the NFL has done is a good first step – it's not going to solve the massive problems we have in our cities and states across this country, but it's a start. And, more importantly, I'm glad we were able to get them to acknowledge their responsibility and role in trying to help solve these problems and injustices. They are making a major commitment, more than they have done for any other charitable initiative, to provide us with the marketing platform to educate millions of fans about social justice, racial inequality and the work players are doing in criminal justice reform, police accountability/transparency and education/economic advancement.

    For myself and the Players Coalition, it was never about the money or having our voices bought. To hear people call me or anyone else a sell-out is insulting. It has always been, and will always be, about lifting the voices of the people and the work of those that fight for them. God Bless.












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    eitedl.jpg

    156s7y0.jpg

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    “Every generation has its own evil. But our evil is a different kind of evil — our systems are evil.” - Rev. Nicholas Richards
  • ShizlanskyShizlansky Posts: 35,075 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Mister B. wrote: »
    This shit is done. Them dudes too divided now.

    Jenkins taking the money fucked everyone up. That should have been a vote.

    No. Them Bniggas fucked up.

    Jenkins is leveraging shit to actually change shit.

    Fuck the kneeling, I wanna see something moves being made
    (Really though?)
    black caesarplaymaker88dnyce215Like WaterthereactionatorJusDre313Chi SnowMaywoodI Self Lord & MasterUndefeatable
  • The Lonious MonkThe Lonious Monk Man with No Fucks Given Posts: 26,236 ✭✭✭✭✭
    NFL don’t need to do anything but get the fuck outta the way

    Yea I don't even understand what the money had to with anything. Niggas talkin bout police brutality and getting rid of racist policies and they wrote a fuckin check......where's the correlation? Smh

    I haven't paid that much attention, but Jenkins made it seem like the money would be going to social justice programs meant to directly address the problems being protested. I could be wrong. Fuck it it doesn't matter anymore.

    It was but I don't see how money helps with that...money ain't stopping a racist jury from handing out not guilty verdicts to cops

    No but the organizations that protest and push for the policy changes that may lead to cops not getting away with murder need money to operate. In this country, everything runs on money. You know that. Shit, with this corrupt government, some times all you need to do is put money in the right hands to get the changes you want.
    Niggas think that they own things and man sits high upon thrones
    But when you die, tell me what the fuck you own.
    When your skin, flesh, and bones find a permanent home
    as food for worms or fossils trapped in stone. - Rza in "What's Going On?"

    m63Y62.gif
  • playmaker88playmaker88 Boy, I tell you that's vision Like Tony Romo when he hitting Witten Posts: 67,842 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 4
    The money wont people with hearts and minds that come from a place of hate...word to the support of this administrations agenda.. and republican in general.. conservative/traditionalist dont give a fuck about throwing money for PR. any action after they have shown who they were time time again.. is PR if is counter to everything you have shown yourself to be its fucking PR.. i dont understand why people don get that
    VulcanRavenaneed123
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