The Ancient Egyptians probably used Piezoelectricity for energy and stone carving

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  • Swiffness!Swiffness! Posts: 7,150 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 2011
  • toomytoomy Posts: 369
    edited August 2011
    VIBE86 wrote: »
    I thought it was a different planet? Can't think of it right now, but the technology is from the Annunaki?

    No. the technology is Egyptian. You're right Siruis is not a planet it's a star. The ancient egyptians are said to have come from the Siruis star system. According to some texts that I have been reading over the past year the Annunaki were Aliens created on Earth in experiments. After causing a nuclear explosion some where around the Greek islands they were expelled by Yahweh or some other God. I know you will find that information unbelievable but that's what I read.
  • toomytoomy Posts: 369
    edited August 2011
    http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/120681124.html

    http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/120681124.html

    Can Cars Driving on the Freeway Actually Generate Electricity?

    The vibration caused when cars roll down a street isn't a sensation most people pay attention to, but California Assemblyman Mike Gatto says those vibrations could be of value to California.

    "I think it's quite possible that a major new source of renewable energy is right beneath our feet, or more accurately, our tires," according to Assemblyman Mike Gatto, D-Burbank.

    He's introduced legislation proposing the state conduct a pilot program placing sensors under roads. The sensors would capture the vibrations caused by cars, which would then be converted into electricity.

    "A one mile stretch of two lane highway can generate enough power to power 500 homes for an entire year, or to power 120 electrical vehicles a day, according to Gatto.

    And street lights, neighborhoods, and traffic signals.

    The technology is called piezoelectric generation.

    "My bill takes existing money that was set aside years ago for creative projects just like this. It does not use any new tax dollars," according to Gatto. "The money is already there, and we're only going to do this when the roads are set for their regularly rescheduled re-paving. We're not going to tear up any roads, we're just going to stick the technology underneath the roads when they're scheduled for paving anyway."

    A potential, renewable energy source for a state with a wealth of cars on the road.
  • whar67whar67 Posts: 542
    edited August 2011
    Junk science always gets me annoyed. All that nonsense about Egyptians using piezoelectric drills just drives me up a wall. The Egyptian were an amazing people that built massive stone structures with copper chisels and no draft animals. They deserve to be acknowledged and remembered for this greatness rather than bullshit about aliens or magical knowledge now lost.

    1. Piezoelectric effect was discovery in 1880. It is not new.
    2. Electricity is amazingly well understood concept. its not like we are missing much in this field.
    3. The Piezoelectric effect has several industrial application which amount a $15 Billion market. It is a well understood and applied concept.

    If your post are to show a cool effect in the world of electricity and the applications that have been used then great. However you seem to think that this effect will someday provide a large portion of our electricity and this will never happen. The effect simply does not generate much electrical force.
  • judahxulujudahxulu Posts: 3,856 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 2011
    toomy wrote: »
    Those are just instructions on how to plug in the piezoelectric devices.

    The idea behind piezoelectric is that you can do simple things like walking and if you have a piezoelectric sensor on your heel it can convert that walking energy into electricity. a mobile phone company have already made a prototype shirt with piezoelectric sensors on it. The people wearing piezoelectric shirts stand in front of live bands playing at a musical festival and the vibrations from the music recharged there sell phones. http://www.treehugger.com/files/2011/06/sound-charged-shirt-from-orange-powers-cell-phones.php I will post you tube videos in the SLtv thread.

    Israel already use piezoelectric sensors on some roads to harvest energy. japan uses piezoelectric sensors in the airport arrival gates to harvest energy. So it's being use already it's just that the public don't no anything about it.

    thats a better link for me...ty
  • toomytoomy Posts: 369
    edited August 2011
    whar67 wrote: »
    Junk science always gets me annoyed. All that nonsense about Egyptians using piezoelectric drills just drives me up a wall. The Egyptian were an amazing people that built massive stone structures with copper chisels and no draft animals. They deserve to be acknowledged and remembered for this greatness rather than bullshit about aliens or magical knowledge now lost.

    1. Piezoelectric effect was discovery in 1880. It is not new.
    2. Electricity is amazingly well understood concept. its not like we are missing much in this field.
    3. The Piezoelectric effect has several industrial application which amount a $15 Billion market. It is a well understood and applied concept.

    If your post are to show a cool effect in the world of electricity and the applications that have been used then great. However you seem to think that this effect will someday provide a large portion of our electricity and this will never happen. The effect simply does not generate much electrical force.


    I'm an artist and I know that it's impossible to chisel out a smooth surface from rough rock/stone using just a hammer and chisel.
  • whar67whar67 Posts: 542
    edited August 2011
    toomy wrote: »
    I'm an artist and I know that it's impossible to chisel out a smooth surface from rough rock/stone using just a hammer and chisel.

    The finishing stones were polished probably with emery.
  • toomytoomy Posts: 369
    edited August 2011
    whar67 wrote: »
    The finishing stones were polished probably with emery.

    Why is it okay for you to speculate but not me? You say it was probably polished by emery. I say they probably used piezoelectricity. We're both guessing. What makes your guess better than mine?
  • Swiffness!Swiffness! Posts: 7,150 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 2011
    toomy wrote: »
    Why is it okay for you to speculate but not me? You say it was probably polished by emery. I say they probably used piezoelectricity. We're both guessing. What makes your guess better than mine?

    Scholarly and academic consensus.

    A hammer and chisel in skilled hands can go a LONG way. Ask Michelangelo. Ask the dudes who built Pumapunku.

    moses_michelangelo.jpg
  • whar67whar67 Posts: 542
    edited August 2011
    toomy wrote: »
    Why is it okay for you to speculate but not me? You say it was probably polished by emery. I say they probably used piezoelectricity. We're both guessing. What makes your guess better than mine?

    Since it is recorded that emery was available to them and would easily work. We continue to use emery to this day. Your speculation includes the existence of an unknown level of efficiency from an electrical effect that somehow the Egyptian knew of then was lost. A level of effect that today we still do not possess even though it is in one of the most well understood phenomenon in the world, electricity.
  • The DiddlerThe Diddler Posts: 17,336
    edited August 2011
    what's this probably shit?

    which culture is older aztec or Eygot? cause they both used that shit.. and them alien muhfukas we evolved from too, them sumarians...
  • toomytoomy Posts: 369
    edited August 2011
    whar67 wrote: »
    Since it is recorded that emery was available to them and would easily work. We continue to use emery to this day. Your speculation includes the existence of an unknown level of efficiency from an electrical effect that somehow the Egyptian knew of then was lost. A level of effect that today we still do not possess even though it is in one of the most well understood phenomenon in the world, electricity.

    How smart do you have to be to rub two stones together?
  • toomytoomy Posts: 369
    edited August 2011
    Swiffness! wrote: »
    Scholarly and academic consensus.

    A hammer and chisel in skilled hands can go a LONG way. Ask Michelangelo. Ask the dudes who built Pumapunku.

    moses_michelangelo.jpg



    The "Great Pyramid" of Khufu is 481 feet. In comparison the empire state building is 1250 feet tall. This makes the Great Pyramid of Khufu about a little over a third of the height of the empire state building. And you think they built that structure by using only a hammer and chisel?

    gpgoodshot.jpg


    At completion, the Great Pyramid was surfaced by white 'casing stones' * slant-faced, but flat-topped, blocks of highly polished white limestone. Visibly all that remains is the underlying step-pyramid core structure seen today. In AD 1301, a massive earthquake loosened many of the outer casing stones, which were then carted away by Bahri Sultan An-Nasir Nasir-ad-Din al-Hasan in 1356 in order to build mosques and fortresses in nearby Cairo.
  • fiat_moneyfiat_money Posts: 16,655 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 2011
    toomy wrote: »
    I'm an artist and I know that it's impossible to chisel out a smooth surface from rough rock/stone using just a hammer and chisel.
    LOL. Conjecture at its finest:
    fiat_money wrote: »
    Smells like conjecture.

    Kind of an appeal to ignorance:
    "I don't know how X occurred, so I propose that Y is cause of it. Since no one else can prove what caused X to occur, the cause must be Y. Therefore, Y is what caused X to occur.".
  • toomytoomy Posts: 369
    edited August 2011
    fiat_money wrote: »
    LOL. Conjecture at its finest:

    Kind of an appeal to ignorance:
    "I don't know how X occurred, so I propose that Y is cause of it. Since no one else can prove what caused X to occur, the cause must be Y. Therefore, Y is what caused X to occur.".


    I don't get what's the big deal about my theory that the ancient egyptians used piezoelectricity. I could be wrong I could be right. But it's only one person's opinion. White supremacy much? Sheez!!

    http://www.phenomenalplace.com/2011/04/great-pyramid-of-giza.html

    Electric_Light_Bulb_Dendera_Giza_Pyramid_Alien.jpg

    This picture shows what looks like a light bulb. The pyramid's internal construction is truly breathtaking with enormous complicated work like The Grand Gallery, The King's Chamber and the Queen's Chamber. Oil lamps do not seem to working as there is not enough oxygen inside the pyramid to support the burning flames. Another theory that they used numerous copper plates (mirrors were not invented at that time, either) does not hold well, as experiments have proved it inefficient. How did they have light, especially if they had to work day and night ceaselessly? Were they using electric bulbs? Not far from here, at the temple of Hathor at Dendera, you can find some reliefs that resemble very closely of a modern electric bulb. The picture of the relief not only shows the bulb and the filament inside it, but also shows a long wire connected to the base of the bulb.

    And look at dude's cornrolls.
  • toomytoomy Posts: 369
    edited August 2011
    Here's my idea for harvesting piezoelectric energy. I would put a piezoelectric sensor inside a solid sound proof sphere along with a mini-drum machine. When the drum machine is on the sounds continuously bounces off of the walls of the sphere hitting the piezo sensors with its sound vibration/waves. This could be a strong continuous flow of green energy.

    Surface-Area-of-a-Sphere.jpg


    crystal_ball_by_destinysolo.jpg
  • fiat_moneyfiat_money Posts: 16,655 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 2011
    toomy wrote: »
    I don't get what's the big deal about my theory that the ancient egyptians used piezoelectricity. I could be wrong I could be right. But it's only one person's opinion. White supremacy much? Sheez!!...
    I don't get what's the big deal about me pointing out your obviously conjectural and logically fallacious argument. It seems your argument fits the definitions of both. But you don't seem to like that. Intolerance to criticism? Sheesh!!

    Conjecture

    con·jec·turenoun \kən-ˈjek-chər\

    2
    a : inference from defective or presumptive evidence
    b
    : a conclusion deduced by surmise or guesswork
    Argument from ignorance


    Argument from ignorance
    , also known as argumentum ad ignorantiam or "appeal to ignorance", is a fallacy in informal logic. It asserts that a proposition is true because it has not been proven false (or vice versa). This represents a type of false dichotomy in that it excludes a third option, which is that there is insufficient investigation and therefore insufficient information to satisfactorily prove the proposition to be either true or false. Nor does it allow the admission that the choices may in fact not be two (true or false), but may be as many as four, (1) true, (2) false, (3) unknown between true or false, and (4) being unknowable (among the first three).[1]
  • toomytoomy Posts: 369
    edited August 2011
    fiat_money wrote: »
    I don't get what's the big deal about me pointing out your obviously conjectural and logically fallacious argument. It seems your argument fits the definitions of both. But you don't seem to like that. Intolerance to criticism? Sheesh!!

    doesn't matter. This is a message board not the Harvard review.
  • fiat_moneyfiat_money Posts: 16,655 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 2011
    toomy wrote: »
    doesn't matter. This is a message board not the Harvard review.
    Doesn't matter. This is a message board, not a kindergarten composition book.

    Things can be criticized, scrutinized, and mocked here.
  • toomytoomy Posts: 369
    edited August 2011
    fiat_money wrote: »
    Doesn't matter. This is a message board, not a kindergarten composition book.

    Things can be criticized, scrutinized, and mocked here.

    You're taking my words and twisting it. Everyone has an opinion and everyone has a right to be wrong. I'm not going to bow down to you just because you think my theory is based on false information or false science.
  • toomytoomy Posts: 369
    edited August 2011
    The western world always like to white wash history and discredit the accomplishments of Blacks/africans. I think everyone should research all source materials and come up with their own conclusions. Look at how they tried to destroy the accomplishments of the Moors.

    Moorish architecture is a term used to describe the articulated Islamic architecture of North Africa and parts of Spain and Portugal where the Moors were dominant from 711–1492. The best surviving examples are La Mezquita in Córdoba and the Alhambra palace (mainly 1338–1390),[19] and also the Giralda in 1184.[20] Other notable examples include the ruined palace city of Medina Azahara (936–1010), the church (former mosque) San Cristo de la Luz in Toledo, the Aljafería in Saragossa and baths at for example Ronda and Alhama de Granada.
  • janklowjanklow god's lonely man. Posts: 5,746 Regulator
    edited August 2011
    toomy wrote: »
    doesn't matter. This is a message board not the Harvard review.
    if you can't stand for people to criticize your arguments, you should probably stop posting on a public message board
  • toomytoomy Posts: 369
    edited August 2011
    janklow wrote: »
    if you can't stand for people to criticize your arguments, you should probably stop posting on a public message board

    it's not like that. How many times can I say I'm not changing my position? I do not follow what the establishment says is law or what the establishment rules are for science and scientistic discovery. The establishment were the ones that painted Jesus white and hide the fact that Beethoven was biracial. They are the ones that destroyed Africa. They're the ones that enslaved us. If you let a person into your home and they rob you then you are a victim. But if you continue to let that person into your home and they continue to rob you then you are a fool.
  • janklowjanklow god's lonely man. Posts: 5,746 Regulator
    edited August 2011
    toomy wrote: »
    it's not like that. How many times can I say I'm not changing my position?
    you not changing your position is not the same thing as you being mad that people are unimpressed with your argument
  • toomytoomy Posts: 369
    edited August 2011
    janklow wrote: »
    you not changing your position is not the same thing as you being mad that people are unimpressed with your argument

    LOL. i could care less what people think. LMAO.
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