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desertrain10 ✭✭✭✭✭

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  • Re: When did Jay fell off?

    Why so much hate for BP3?

    It wasn't one of his best albums, but I wouldn't say it was garbage. And it was definitely listenable. Better than BP2

    His flow somewhat changed but he was still Jay

    Already Home, As Real As it Gets, What We Talkin Bout, Thank You, So Ambitious>>>

    Empire State of Mind, Run This Town, A Star Is Born, D.O.A. ....were hit singles/serviceable tracks

    I will admit Hate, Mar vs Venus were garbage
    StoneColdMikeyRevolver OcelotKid Dynastyeternal soldierDR. JEKSolitary Soldier
  • Re: did beyonce really help jayz get to the next level...i call bullshit

    usmarin3 wrote: »
    Sion wrote: »
    Sion wrote: »
    She didn't make him popular or create him he did that himself but marrying her did open him up to a much wider audience that would have otherwise been ignorant to him or Hip-Hop music. I'm talking about the Oprah Winfrey, Ellen DeGeneres audience. It elevated his status not his success.

    How so? Honestly.. Beyonce was not "Beyonce" in 02-03.. her and destiny's child were on their 1 break and they both were well known in hip hop circles.. imo Beyonce got more of a push in her career than he did for his for them being together..

    If im not mistaken wasnt Jay-Z the president of def jam around that time? Yeah he had all the success he needed... he could have chose any chick at that point and been good..


    Beyonce was a worldwide superstar and at the forefront of pop music. She was what 40 million sold as a group and almost double diamond off her first album which you could say was her prime creatively and having words inducted into the dictionary. She even made more money than Jay (which he famously bragged about). She sold his career in 2 albums. Her female audience included the likes of Oprah, Ellen, Martha Stewart and people like that. I'm saying she opened him up to that audience who would have never fucked with him before he became "Beyonce's husband to them. It raised his profile to a wider audience outside of urban media. It raised his stature across other social circles too. Beyonce could have had any man in the world - any icon, billionaires, ministers, presidents, CEOs you name it and she still would have been "Beyonce the superstar". They helped each other but I'd definitely say Hov did benefit the most from cuffing her.

    She didnt do all that until 03.. her 1st cd dropped during that time but hip hop itself is not as "urban" as it is lead to believe ( Kevin Gates was just on the Conan O'Brian performing "two phones" and "really really")

    Beyonce didnt really become "Beyonce" until between 06-08.. Jay-Z was making moves way before then..

    Destiny's Child was one of the most successful groups in history

    They sold over 20 million records and made millions touring

    So she was already a household name before she went solo

    And this was well before she and Jay became public

    I would say they each had played a role in each other's most recent successes though

    Beyonce was a household name. Stop it!

    That's like saying Dawn Robinson from En Vogue was a household name. Beyonce didn't come into her own until Dangerously in Love. People knew her as the chick in Destiny's Child, not Beyonce.

    Bruh

    She was the lead vocalist and face of the group

    And did I mention they sold over 20 million records lol
    atribecalledgabi
  • Re: Ayesha Curry Vs. Thots Pt. 2

    deadeye wrote: »
    Like Water wrote: »
    Question: Is there such a thing as a feminist that's attractive, heterosexual, physically fit and in a stable and happy relationship? Every time I see one, they on some mud duck, fat ass, single/gay, unhappy shit.

    Lol

    I know when I think of intelligent, strong, blk feminist I think of: assata shakur, angela davis, bell hooks, etc


    It's an insult to compare them to the crazies that dominate today's feminist movement.

    Shud up ol man

    They were once labeled as outsiders or in some cases crazy when they were pointing out the sexism in the civil rights movement and in the blk panther party


    zzombiedeadeye
  • Re: Ayesha Curry Vs. Thots Pt. 2

    jono wrote: »
    Ita a fair assessment. If someone tells you or acts like there is only one way to behave and act to be worthy of respect then you would be offended too.

    The problem is here is she isn't doing the judging. She is being pointed out as a standard and folks reject that standard. Ain't shit wrong with that. Yall complain if you think a nigga should only dress and behave a certain way to be worthy of respect.

    Yep

    It’s intertwined with the politics of respectability

    Her persona is being used as another opportunity for the basement dwellers to attack any woman who isn’t buttoned up, any woman who has an overtly sexy image, and any woman who doesn’t meet the measurement for “wifeability" or better yet respect gets the “we need more women like Ayesha”

    Which is obviously problematic

    And it is dangerous for the women who are being attacked for not “living up” to an ideal I'm sure they never declared any allegiance to in the first place

    Now she is catching some of the blow back

    Her initial tweets that started this whole thing about being covered up were a lil problematic as well, so she isn't exactly innocent. In a roundabout way she insinuated that women who dress a certain way are doing it for the wrong reasons, as if women don't have other reasons besides the male gaze to prefer a certain style of clothing

    It's unfortunate, but she'll survive

    honest question why do women wear things like thong bikinis... short shorts... and high cut skirts... for other than male attention.

    Lol

    Women, like men, often dress according to fashion. So maybe she may just want to be trendy and stylish

    We love our bodies. And like the way it makes our bodies look

    Or maybe because it's hot

    For the sake of knowing most other women you know wouldn't be able to pull the same outfit off

    Not as if there is anything wrong with a heterosexual woman seeking male attention- feeling desirable and attractive feels good

    There are other ways to gain a man's attention. What we choose to wear is just one way

    Same as when a man dresses a certain way, or puts on cologne, or buys a particular car to attract women

    If me simply wearing a thong bikini provokes a man into groping me or calling me out my name that is out of my control and should reflect poorly upon him

    All this talk of what should be considered respectable is just another way to police and govern over anyone who doesn't adhere to the traditional values of white, Christian, hetero men

    but you can be trendy and stylish without wearing short shorts or a thong bikini...

    btw the last part has nothing to do with white... Christian hetero men... in pretty much all cultures the less the woman wears the less respect she gets from men.. not saying its right but its the truth..


    also outside of the "its hot" argument every point you said for reasons women wear clothes like that.. point to getting attention... but you cant dress like that and want attention but get mad at the attention you get...

    Attention is one thing, but disrespect is another

    And in many cultures around the world the women walk around basically nude

    Go to some remote villages in Africa, the women are basically nude


    gnsAggyAFWhoisDonG???Abraxas rip.dillaa.manndeadeyeHuey_CLos216
  • Re: Ayesha Curry Vs. Thots Pt. 2

    blackrain wrote: »
    jono wrote: »
    Ita a fair assessment. If someone tells you or acts like there is only one way to behave and act to be worthy of respect then you would be offended too.

    The problem is here is she isn't doing the judging. She is being pointed out as a standard and folks reject that standard. Ain't shit wrong with that. Yall complain if you think a nigga should only dress and behave a certain way to be worthy of respect.

    Yep

    It’s intertwined with the politics of respectability

    Her persona is being used as another opportunity for the basement dwellers to attack any woman who isn’t buttoned up, any woman who has an overtly sexy image, and any woman who doesn’t meet the measurement for “wifeability" or better yet respect gets the “we need more women like Ayesha”

    Which is obviously problematic

    And it is dangerous for the women who are being attacked for not “living up” to an ideal I'm sure they never declared any allegiance to in the first place

    Now she is catching some of the blow back

    Her initial tweets that started this whole thing about being covered up were a lil problematic as well, so she isn't exactly innocent. In a roundabout way she insinuated that women who dress a certain way are doing it for the wrong reasons, as if women don't have other reasons besides the male gaze to prefer a certain style of clothing

    It's unfortunate, but she'll survive

    That's not her fault though. She didn't say that, other people put that image of being the standard onto her. People coming at her personally for some shit she didn't do, say, or ask for. That's why people say those who got negative things to say are projecting their own insecurities onto a person who don't got shit to do with how they feel. If somebody simply living their life can make you not like them, you're the problem.

    Her initial tweets weren't even that bad, people just made more of them than what they were on some hit dog will holler shit. People want her to be the stereotype of an athlete's wife so bad and the fact that she's not pisses some people off.

    Yes, she doesn't deserve a lot of the personal attacks

    But if we are being honest, while her comments were not atypical of many Christian women, they were really unnecessary

    They were also self congratulating and judgemental

    The type that usually invoke a strong reaction, one way or another
    gnszzombieAggyAFCopperLcnsdbyROYALTYLPastWhoisDonG???Abraxas deadeyeMorganFreemanKingAfrica United