What's up everyone. We are doing a contest with T.I. and we are giving away $1200 a day for the next 10 days. Just wanted to give you all a heads up.
https://www.allhiphop.com/ti

When did you First Fall in Love with Independent/Underground Hip Hop?

RuffDraftRuffDraft Members, Writer Posts: 4,753 ✭✭✭✭
edited February 2011 in The Essence
Inspired by Brown Sugar and the fine ass Sanaa Lathan.
sanaa-lathan.jpg

I first fell in love with Sanaa... I mean underground hip hop when I heard Reflection Eternals "A Train of Thought".
61SVMeeuNYL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

The beats took over my brain for weeks and Kweli really hit that album lyrically; I remember sitting on the floor next to the Stereo System reading the tiny lyrics in the booklet and just being blown away. A classic in many peoples eyes and certainly in my own, I thought The Blast sonically was superb and the battle raps on Down for the Count featuring Xzibit and Rah Digga were up there with the best I'd ever heard. I saw Kweli live with Kanye West years later, I didn't realise Kweli was going to be there and heard "Move Somethin'" kick in, I proceeded to shout "Get Em Up, Get Em Up, WHAT?!" Kweli would of course become more known to the masses as the years passed, but I was on my own with that one at the time and felt privileged to have heard it before seeing him live in the flesh.

When did you first fall in love with underground hip hop?
«1

Comments

  • renagade410.renagade410. Members Posts: 647 ✭✭✭
    edited February 2011
    Thats crazy because that was actually the cd that got me into the underground. Dont even remember what got me to buy the cd it was either from hearing the blast or it was on somebody's list of music you should hear. Used to listen to it every Saturday morning when i woke up...the entire cd. Favorite song was memories live.

    I actually didn't see that as underground tho so i guess my very first true underground purchase was either revolutionary vol 2 or the minstrel show cant remember which i bought first. Add the power of the internet plus the essence on here and i was listening to various underground acts in no time. Its crazy because i started out thinking immortal technique was the dopest rapper period now he prob not even in my top 30.

    dam when i really think about it i actually cant remember when because my brother had put me onto big L back in 03.
  • RuffDraftRuffDraft Members, Writer Posts: 4,753 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2011
    Thats crazy because that was actually the cd that got me into the underground. Dont even remember what got me to buy the cd it was either from hearing the blast or it was on somebody's list of music you should hear. Used to listen to it every Saturday morning when i woke up...the entire cd. Favorite song was memories live.

    I actually didn't see that as underground tho so i guess my very first true underground purchase was either revolutionary vol 2 or the minstrel show cant remember which i bought first. Add the power of the internet plus the essence on here and i was listening to various underground acts in no time. Its crazy because i started out thinking immortal technique was the dopest rapper period now he prob not even in my top 30.

    dam when i really think about it i actually cant remember when because my brother had put me onto big L back in 03.

    lol I bought it for the cover due to my theory that if an album has a good album cover, it's a good album lol. I stand by that in some ways as it shows that they've stayed true rather than having an album cover with their picture on as a lot of Artists did back in those days and probably still do... Memories Live is dope, agreed.

    I think I always saw it as underground as it was on Rawkus... but yeah, Immortal Technique is definitely underground, but I always ignored him as I wasn't a fan of his politically heavy tracks. Minstrel Show was dope, I copped that as well. But agreed, The Essence really put me on when I first started listening and it's been a wrap ever since. It's a shame the original posters here are missing. But it's good that we're still pushing it forward.

    Big L underground after his death?? I thought he was common knowledge after his death like most posthumous releases from Artists are always well known... Big L, Big L, Rest in peace...
  • satyronesatyrone Members Posts: 4,696 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2011
    hmmm its hard to tell when cuz since the 90s ive always been into 🤬 that wasnt always getting played on the radio. i mean yea i was listening to all the Death Row 🤬 but at the same time i was listening to Das Efx,EPMD,Artifacts,Del etc. so i dunno what got me into underground i think i jus vered off to that side of hip-hop more. in like the mid 90s i was listen to 🤬 like Latyrx(Lyrics Born's group)Blackalicous,ZIon I,The Coup,Company Flow and a gang of others. so yea its hard to pin point ive been on it since forever i think
  • renagade410.renagade410. Members Posts: 647 ✭✭✭
    edited February 2011
    RuffDraft wrote: »
    lol I bought it for the cover due to my theory that if an album has a good album cover, it's a good album lol. I stand by that in some ways as it shows that they've stayed true rather than having an album cover with their picture on as a lot of Artists did back in those days and probably still do... Memories Live is dope, agreed.

    I think I always saw it as underground as it was on Rawkus... but yeah, Immortal Technique is definitely underground, but I always ignored him as I wasn't a fan of his politically heavy tracks. Minstrel Show was dope, I copped that as well. But agreed, The Essence really put me on when I first started listening and it's been a wrap ever since. It's a shame the original posters here are missing. But it's good that we're still pushing it forward.

    Big L underground after his death?? I thought he was common knowledge after his death like most posthumous releases from Artists are always well known... Big L, Big L, Rest in peace...

    the cover did it for me too...and fye used to let u preview the cd if u scanned the cd under some device that had headphones on it.

    its weird because alot off ppl knew about talib kweli but nobody knew about big L so i viewed talib as a lil more mainstream n big L as underground even tho its more so the opposite as i got older. I been on allhiphop since like 04...been lurkin since 03 ALOt of the ppl have left since i first was lurkin...i blame the 3 upgrades smh(R.I.P 10,000 post)
  • RuffDraftRuffDraft Members, Writer Posts: 4,753 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2011
    the cover did it for me too...and fye used to let u preview the cd if u scanned the cd under some device that had headphones on it.

    its weird because alot off ppl knew about talib kweli but nobody knew about big L so i viewed talib as a lil more mainstream n big L as underground even tho its more so the opposite as i got older. I been on allhiphop since like 04...been lurkin since 03 ALOt of the ppl have left since i first was lurkin...i blame the 3 upgrades smh(R.I.P 10,000 post)

    That's dope. Ahh okay, I always viewed Big L as more mainstream because of his popularity post-death...

    Yeah, no doubt, same, I been here since the same time period. Lurked the same time as well, I always thought it was too geeky, but yeah, one of my usernames had over 10,000 posts and another had 3-4,000 and it's just been the way of the I.C. unfortunately. Good that people are still posting, Getwitcha and a few others are still here, but most people have moved on... can't blame them after each I.C. upgrade.
  • traestartraestar Atlantic City, NJMembers Posts: 6,030 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2011
    When I was three, I remembered dancing to Rob Base and E-Z Roc's It Takes Two!!
    Also to Eric B and Rakim's Eric B for President and I ain't no joke!!
    So I've been listening to Hip Hop since I was young! Dad used to collect vinyls and Dr Dre and KRS One CDs when I got older!

    But when I first listened to Underground Hip Hop, it started with Rawkus '98! In short,
    listened to Funkmaster Flex's demo of Black On Both Sides/ Internal Affairs
    and I listened to this cassette everyday!! Previously listened to Big Pun, BIG,
    and Pac before they died/killed, but after Underground Hip Hop came around, I started to direct my ear to
    this sound instead of falling into the industry in which was changing before our very eyes.

    To help convert, I used to listen to Music Choice on Comcast and looked for different artists
    from Underground Hip Hop to research on! Thats where J-Live, Madlib,
    Murs, Reflections Eternal, Slum Village, Little Brother and many others came into the picture!
    The more I listened, the more my ear got used to it!! I still was in tune with the
    mainstream, especially during the mixtape era '00-'03 in which introduced even more artists that
    I listen to today! I didn't own any albums untll 2001, because thats when I started
    working! But as technology got better, my catalog became greater!
  • traestartraestar Atlantic City, NJMembers Posts: 6,030 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2011
    Train of Thought definitely was one of those albums that drew me in, in fact "Move Something" was the "other" track to
    draw me into the Underground! So I have to credit Talib for truthfully getting me hooked in!
  • RuffDraftRuffDraft Members, Writer Posts: 4,753 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2011
    traestar wrote: »
    When I was three, I remembered dancing to Rob Base and E-Z Roc's It Takes Two!!
    Also to Eric B and Rakim's Eric B for President and I ain't no joke!!
    So I've been listening to Hip Hop since I was young! Dad used to collect vinyls and Dr Dre and KRS One CDs when I got older!

    But when I first listened to Underground Hip Hop, it started with Rawkus '98! In short,
    listened to Funkmaster Flex's demo of Black On Both Sides/ Internal Affairs
    and I listened to this cassette everyday!! Previously listened to Big Pun, BIG,
    and Pac before they died/killed, but after Underground Hip Hop came around, I started to direct my ear to
    this sound instead of falling into the industry in which was changing before our very eyes.

    To help convert, I used to listen to Music Choice on Comcast and looked for different artists
    from Underground Hip Hop to research on! Thats where J-Live, Madlib,
    Murs, Reflections Eternal, Slum Village, Little Brother and many others came into the picture!
    The more I listened, the more my ear got used to it!! I still was in tune with the
    mainstream, especially during the mixtape era '00-'03 in which introduced even more artists that
    I listen to today! I didn't own any albums untll 2001, because thats when I started
    working! But as technology got better, my catalog became greater!

    Good post, you're lucky having a father figure who put you on to hip hop from an early age. I remember listening to the Fugees and 2pac but I had no idea it was hip hop, then got into hip hop back in 98 properly, is funny how an ear can always listen for a certain sound. I remember being 6 or 7 and enjoying the Outhere Brothers BOOM BOOM BOOM lol. But that's just how it was...I was 9 lol just checked it on the Net. Throwback video:

    Not sure if it classes as hip hop, but I also loved Coolio as a kid and anything Sister Sister was promoting at that time hahaha

    But yeah, R.E. got me into the Underground when I was a teen :tu
  • MastaAceTheGOATMastaAceTheGOAT Members Posts: 724
    edited February 2011
    I only realized about two years ago. I copped skyzoos album and thought it was dope so I started looking at duck down then the 80s and them current underground. I'm really happy with the music I listen to atm
  • Lou CypherLou Cypher Make Reasonable Choices. H. E. Double Hockey SticksMembers Posts: 52,520 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2011
    ah man i think i was 14 or so. i listened to whatever was on mtv at that time and i posted on this shady records fan site (dashadyboard.com) cuz eminem was my fave rapper at the time, and everyone on that site would start debating what rappers were better than eminem and i had never heard of any of them. im from alaska so there isnt alot of great music stores here, so when i went on a trip to cali that year i found a store that sold alot of independant music, so that day i bought Chino XL - Here to Save You All and Royce Da 5'9 - Death Is Certain.

    been buying/downloading independant ever since. Turned the radio off forever haha.
  • RuffDraftRuffDraft Members, Writer Posts: 4,753 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2011
    I only realized about two years ago. I copped skyzoos album and thought it was dope so I started looking at duck down then the 80s and them current underground. I'm really happy with the music I listen to atm

    That's dope, Skyzoo is a good artist to get you into independent hip hop. LB and CunninLynguists over the years have brought people here too, then probably Blu. They're the classic crossover Artists for most mainstream listeners if you look at who has brought members to The Essence in the past.
  • beats&rhymesbeats&rhymes Members Posts: 195
    edited February 2011
    Late 90's for me When commercial hip hop started it's demise and it started with a mixture of indie labels a friend put me onto. Stones Throw, Rawkus, ABB, and then a little bit later Def Jux. It opened up a whole new world of dope artists and producers and i never looked back. A couple of tracks that stick in my mind at that particular time.

    Their are many more, too many to list.
  • RuffDraftRuffDraft Members, Writer Posts: 4,753 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2011
    Late 90's for me When commercial hip hop started it's demise and it started with a mixture of indie labels a friend put me onto. Stones Throw, Rawkus, ABB, and then a little bit later Def Jux. It opened up a whole new world of dope artists and producers and i never looked back. A couple of tracks that stick in my mind at that particular time.

    Their are many more, too many to list.

    Good post :tu I'm really glad I got to hear the underground - mainly for the underground producers who create soundscapes that are no longer prevalent in the mainstream. It's one of the biggest differences, IMO. But also that Artists seem more well rounded and talk about a lot more relevant topics.
  • a.manna.mann Members Posts: 19,746 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2011
    Well it was really wasn’t my intention to “for in love” with underground/independent hip hop.
    Just that when it all was said and done….must of the artists I enjoy listening to just so happen to be considered as such.
    And this was around 94. Cause a lot dope hip hop back then was sign to majors or one of their subsidiaries.
    Wasn’t til around 96 when the underground really got underground

    Side note: I don’t like the term “underground” hip hop these days.

    Right now THAT is hip hop and the 🤬 on the radio/BET/MTV is Hip POP
  • RuffDraftRuffDraft Members, Writer Posts: 4,753 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2011
    a.mann wrote: »
    Well it was really wasn’t my intention to “for in love” with underground/independent hip hop.
    Just that when it all was said and done….must of the artists I enjoy listening to just so happen to be considered as such.
    And this was around 94. Cause a lot dope hip hop back then was sign to majors or one of their subsidiaries.
    Wasn’t til around 96 when the underground really got underground

    Side note: I don’t like the term “underground” hip hop these days.

    Right now THAT is hip hop and the 🤬 on the radio/BET/MTV is Hip POP

    All true, but when you have posters who post here who post mainstream artists in the underground hip hop album of the year, it's needed as a term lol.

    It's true though, the real hip hop is in the underground and when the hip pop dies down and the true hip hop takes the reigns, these mainstream labels are going to be left wondering where they went wrong.
  • traestartraestar Atlantic City, NJMembers Posts: 6,030 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2011
    RuffDraft wrote: »
    Good post, you're lucky having a father figure who put you on to hip hop from an early age. I remember listening to the Fugees and 2pac but I had no idea it was hip hop, then got into hip hop back in 98 properly, is funny how an ear can always listen for a certain sound. I remember being 6 or 7 and enjoying the Outhere Brothers BOOM BOOM BOOM lol. But that's just how it was...I was 9 lol just checked it on the Net. Throwback video:

    Not sure if it classes as hip hop, but I also loved Coolio as a kid and anything Sister Sister was promoting at that time hahaha

    But yeah, R.E. got me into the Underground when I was a teen :tu

    🤬 Boom Boom Boom takes me way back!!!

    Thank you! You know another thing about Atlantic City that is so under the radar is its Hip Hop influence, when I was younger I would
    hear music on like MTV, The Box, BET, and with the like! But the culture outside of that in A.C. was very small.
    And we had rappers from here that tried to make it big as a rapper but never got that serious recognition.
    There were artists like Q45 and Mack Capone which I know personally that didn't have that recognition, however
    their content I never got into, the only dude who really got shine from here was New Jersey Devil (Game's producer)!

    But anyways, alot of the artists I've listened to where from NY and Philly anyway,
    So we were also fortunate to be within arms length of New York and Philadelphia and able to here that Boom Bap!
  • a.manna.mann Members Posts: 19,746 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2011
    RuffDraft wrote: »
    All true, but when you have posters who post here who post mainstream artists in the underground hip hop album of the year, it's needed as a term lol.

    It's true though, the real hip hop is in the underground and when the hip pop dies down and the true hip hop takes the reigns, these mainstream labels are going to be left wondering where they went wrong.


    feel that and I understand the "need" for the term, just I don't care for it as time goes by, sort like i never cared for the term "neo-soul".....a true marketing ploy, which thankfully has been shunned to the point of non-existence

    I know with "underground" hip hop there is a difference ,mainly cuz alot headz and even artists embrace the term with great pride.
    Just that personally these last few years as mainstream rap sunken to depths greater still…. I think its THEM that should be labeling their 🤬 for what it is…....Hip Pop.
  • traestartraestar Atlantic City, NJMembers Posts: 6,030 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2011
    Lou Cypher wrote: »
    ah man i think i was 14 or so. i listened to whatever was on mtv at that time and i posted on this shady records fan site (dashadyboard.com) cuz eminem was my fave rapper at the time, and everyone on that site would start debating what rappers were better than eminem and i had never heard of any of them. im from alaska so there isnt alot of great music stores here, so when i went on a trip to cali that year i found a store that sold alot of independant music, so that day i bought Chino XL - Here to Save You All and Royce Da 5'9 - Death Is Certain.

    been buying/downloading independant ever since. Turned the radio off forever haha.

    I hear that, I officially turned off the radio in 2004! New Jersey radio that is, lol!! If you are in NY and your tired of their radio, you'll commit suicide in New Jersey!!

    And Eminem I liked during his beginning years, found out later on he was apart of the Soundbombing movement before!
    Him, Royce Da 5'9" and Slum Village (more importantly Jay Dee) introduced me to that Detroit Hip Hop back in '99!
  • traestartraestar Atlantic City, NJMembers Posts: 6,030 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2011
    a.mann wrote: »
    Well it was really wasn’t my intention to “for in love” with underground/independent hip hop.
    Just that when it all was said and done….must of the artists I enjoy listening to just so happen to be considered as such.
    And this was around 94. Cause a lot dope hip hop back then was sign to majors or one of their subsidiaries.
    Wasn’t til around 96 when the underground really got underground

    Side note: I don’t like the term “underground” hip hop these days.

    Right now THAT is hip hop and the 🤬 on the radio/BET/MTV is Hip POP

    Word up, thats when it split around that time! And I mean the term underground or backpack I don't officially like either
    but to me it just gives it a title! But then you're right, this 🤬 in the mainstream is Hip Pop!!
  • MastaAceTheGOATMastaAceTheGOAT Members Posts: 724
    edited February 2011
    the only problem with listening to underground music late, is that you miss on so much stuff and because its not widely discussed in the public, its difficult to do research. after Skyzoo, i bought black milk, Fashawn and little brother records and i was away. I was truly sold with Masta Ace and that dude Stricklin
  • RuffDraftRuffDraft Members, Writer Posts: 4,753 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2011
    traestar wrote: »
    🤬 Boom Boom Boom takes me way back!!!

    Thank you! You know another thing about Atlantic City that is so under the radar is its Hip Hop influence, when I was younger I would
    hear music on like MTV, The Box, BET, and with the like! But the culture outside of that in A.C. was very small.
    And we had rappers from here that tried to make it big as a rapper but never got that serious recognition.
    There were artists like Q45 and Mack Capone which I know personally that didn't have that recognition, however
    their content I never got into, the only dude who really got shine from here was New Jersey Devil (Game's producer)!

    But anyways, alot of the artists I've listened to where from NY and Philly anyway,
    So we were also fortunate to be within arms length of New York and Philadelphia and able to here that Boom Bap!

    hahaha Boom Boom Boom was a classic record, I had that on cassette tape lol!
    a.mann wrote: »
    feel that and I understand the "need" for the term, just I don't care for it as time goes by, sort like i never cared for the term "neo-soul".....a true marketing ploy, which thankfully has been shunned to the point of non-existence

    I know with "underground" hip hop there is a difference ,mainly cuz alot headz and even artists embrace the term with great pride.
    Just that personally these last few years as mainstream rap sunken to depths greater still…. I think its THEM that should be labeling their 🤬 for what it is…....Hip Pop.

    Yeah, I'm going to stick by the term just to keep the hip pop fans away from The Essence though, unless they want to discuss what we refer to as 'The Real'. I was always inclined to 'neo-soul' as a way of describing the different sound, but not so much as a genre, agreed. It'd be more in reference when discussing with someone, it sounds what is now labelled as 'neo-soul'.

    But yeah, they're never going to label it as Hip Pop, they're still talking about these artists being the GOAT's lol.
    traestar wrote: »
    I hear that, I officially turned off the radio in 2004! !

    Same haha but yeah, Eminem was ill on them Soundbombing tapes, I only got into him when he dropped the SSLP, but he was brilliant on those first two LP's and began his decline with TES.
    the only problem with listening to underground music late, is that you miss on so much stuff and because its not widely discussed in the public, its difficult to do research. after Skyzoo, i bought black milk, Fashawn and little brother records and i was away. I was truly sold with Masta Ace and that dude Stricklin

    Yeah, it's true that it's hard to find at times, but for the most part, we manage to stay on top of it all... especially at the end of the year when people get together and share their favourites, which is what I love about December. Should be another great year for independent hip hop, can't wait!
  • NeslomNeslom Members Posts: 431
    edited February 2011
    Around '03-'04. I got tired of listening to the same stuff (not because it was commercial, just needed some new artists). I started listening to some rap from the late 80's and early 90's before I went into underground.

    These albums really got me into underground

    d27280g18mo.jpg

    tonedeff+archtype.jpg

    alonghot.jpg

    After that... Jedi Mind Tricks and Aesop Rock, a bit CunninLynguists, Little Brother.
  • RuffDraftRuffDraft Members, Writer Posts: 4,753 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2011
    Neslom wrote: »
    Around '03-'04. I got tired of listening to the same stuff (not because it was commercial, just needed some new artists). I started listening to some rap from the late 80's and early 90's before I went into underground.

    These albums really got me into underground

    After that... Jedi Mind Tricks and Aesop Rock, a bit CunninLynguists, Little Brother.

    A Long Hot Summer is one of the greatest albums, ever. Can't wait for the new CunninLynguists to drop!!!
  • NeslomNeslom Members Posts: 431
    edited February 2011
    RuffDraft wrote: »
    A Long Hot Summer is one of the greatest albums, ever. Can't wait for the new CunninLynguists to drop!!!

    Ace became an instant favorite rapper after that.Been too long since I really heard CunninLynguists, heard their Strange Journey Vol 1 mixtape. "Broken Van (Thinking of You)" is really good. When will the new album drop?
  • MastaAceTheGOATMastaAceTheGOAT Members Posts: 724
    edited February 2011
    RuffDraft wrote: »
    A Long Hot Summer is one of the greatest albums, ever. Can't wait for the new CunninLynguists to drop!!!

    One of the few who improved with age. Disposable Arts is a classic swell. His debut take a look around is dope to. He is the only rapper I listen to that I can say he has not one wack songs
Sign In or Register to comment.