What's up everybody! Just a quick message. We will be relaunching AllHipHop.com with the goal of keeping the community front and center. I have worked with Jamal and select moderators, to make sure The Illl Community's needs are being addressed as we evolve. We are encouraging you to use the new platform.

We will NOT be closing the current community, but we will be porting user data over to the new system over time, so please get used to using the new community!

We will be working on it every single day until it's exactly what you want!

Please feel free to join now, test, as we are in beta:

https://www.allhiphop.com

The septuigant bible proovez

rapluvarapluva Posts: 232
edited March 2010 in R & R (Religion and Race)
THE SEPTUIGANT BIBLE PROOVEZ, that the majority 95-99% of the Hebrew Izraelites (H.I.) don't know what they r talkin bout, the 12 tribez R NOT in Central/South America, the way that H.I. discribe them, Sons Of Yacob/ others r just that STUPID 2 believe/teach it HAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Replies

  • TX_Made713TX_Made713 Posts: 3,954 ✭✭
    edited March 2010
    do u even know what the septuigant is?
  • Mr. AJMr. AJ Posts: 1,706 ✭✭
    edited March 2010
    Jewish scholars first translated the Torah into Koine Greek in the third century BC. According to the record in the Talmud. <<<<And were supposed to embrace the Septuagint? No Thanks, its based off of the Babylonian Text Talmud
  • TX_Made713TX_Made713 Posts: 3,954 ✭✭
    edited March 2010
    Mr. AJ wrote: »
    Jewish scholars first translated the Torah into Koine Greek in the third century BC. According to the record in the Talmud. <<<<And were supposed to embrace the Septuagint? No Thanks, its based off of the Babylonian Text Talmud

    And the bible is based off the Torah and a bunch of other manuscripts found centuries later and thrown together...whats the difference?
  • rapluvarapluva Posts: 232
    edited March 2010
    TX_Made713 wrote: »
    do u even know what the septuigant is?

    Yes it's the Hebrew Bible Translated into Greek by 72 Hebrew Scribes in 258 B.C.
    that TOTALLY contradictes the Gentile (White-Honkey) 1611/30 KJV which proovez the 12 TRIBEZ R NOT in CentralS. America and the carribianz, and Samoans/Hawians/Mexicanz R NOT part of the 12 tribez.
  • rapluvarapluva Posts: 232
    edited March 2010
    Mr. AJ wrote: »
    Jewish scholars first translated the Torah into Koine Greek in the third century BC. According to the record in the Talmud. <<<<And were supposed to embrace the Septuagint? No Thanks, its based off of the Babylonian Text Talmud

    The Talmud IZ Hebrew scripturez mixed in with Babylonian myth, U got the info ALL mixed up, but U'r Hebrew I shouldn't have expected much anywayz.
    (And I mean that 1000%)
  • sounds of jacobsounds of jacob Posts: 166
    edited March 2010
    Mr. AJ wrote: »
    jewish scholars first translated the torah into koine greek in the third century bc. According to the record in the talmud. <<<<and were supposed to embrace the septuagint? No thanks, its based off of the babylonian text talmud

    .... This ^
  • sounds of jacobsounds of jacob Posts: 166
    edited March 2010
    rapluva wrote: »
    The Talmud IZ Hebrew scripturez mixed in with Babylonian myth, U got the info ALL mixed up, but U'r Hebrew I shouldn't have expected much anywayz.
    (And I mean that 1000%)

    FIRST OFF YOUR TEXT IS COLLOQUIAL HOW CAN WE ADDRESS YOU SERIOUSLY ? FURTHER MORE WE READ HEBREW ( IBARYA) LASHAWAN HA QUDASH SO WHY ARE WE EMPHASIZING THE 1611 TRANSLATION GOD ? ..

    @ TX_Made713 THE WORD BIBLE COMES FROM A CAANINITE DEITY BIBLIOS SO WE WERE NOT CALLING IT THAT THE GREEKS DID ... .. FURTHER MORE TORAH IS THE FIRST 5 BOOKS OF MOSES BUT ITS NOT JUST THAT ON FACE VALUE ..
    YOU SAID "and a bunch of other manuscripts found centuries later and thrown together...whats the difference"?

    THATS RHETORIC SHOW AND PROVE


    BARAK ATHAH YHWH SHALAWAM
  • TX_Made713TX_Made713 Posts: 3,954 ✭✭
    edited March 2010

    @ TX_Made713 THE WORD BIBLE COMES FROM A CAANINITE DEITY BIBLIOS SO WE WERE NOT CALLING IT THAT THE GREEKS DID ... .. FURTHER MORE TORAH IS THE FIRST 5 BOOKS OF MOSES BUT ITS NOT JUST THAT ON FACE VALUE ..
    YOU SAID "and a bunch of other manuscripts found centuries later and thrown together...whats the difference"?

    THATS RHETORIC SHOW AND PROVE


    BARAK ATHAH YHWH SHALAWAM



    The Septuagint (pronounced /ˈsɛptʊ.ədʒɪnt/), or simply "LXX", referred to in critical works by the abbreviation ,[1] is the Koine Greek version of the Hebrew Bible, translated in stages between the 3rd and 2nd Centuries BCE in Alexandria.[2] It was begun by the third century BCE and completed before 132 BCE.[3]

    It is the oldest of several ancient translations of the Hebrew Bible into Greek, lingua franca of the eastern Mediterranean Basin from the time of Alexander the Great (356-323 BCE).

    The Septuagint was held in great respect in ancient times; Philo and Josephus ascribed divine inspiration to its authors.[4] Besides the Old Latin versions, the LXX is also the basis for the Slavonic, the Syriac, Old Armenian, Old Georgian and Coptic versions of the Old Testament.[5] Of significance for all Christians and for Bible scholars, the LXX is quoted by the New Testament and by the Apostolic Fathers.



    Jewish scholars first translated the Torah into Koine Greek in the third century BC.[6][7] According to the record in the Talmud,

    'King Ptolemy once gathered 72 Elders. He placed them in 72 chambers, each of them in a separate one, without revealing to them why they were summoned. He entered each one's room and said: 'Write for me the Torah of Moshe, your teacher.' God put it in the heart of each one to translate identically as all the others did'[8]

    Further books were translated over the next two centuries. It is not altogether clear which was translated when, or where; some may even have been translated twice, into different versions, and then revised.[9] The quality and style of the different translators also varied considerably from book to book, from the literal to paraphrasing to interpretative. According to one assessment "the Pentateuch is reasonably well translated, but the rest of the books, especially the poetical books, are often very poorly done and even contain sheer absurdities".[10]

    As the work of translation progressed gradually, and new books were added to the collection, the compass of the Greek Bible came to be somewhat indefinite. The Pentateuch always maintained its pre-eminence as the basis of the canon; but the prophetic collection (out of which the Nevi'im were selected) changed its aspect by having various hagiographa incorporated into it. Some of the newer works, those called anagignoskomena in Greek, are not included in the Jewish canon. Among these books are Maccabees and the Wisdom of Ben Sira. Also, the Septuagint version of some works, like Daniel and Esther, are longer than those in the Masoretic Text.[11] Some of the later books (Wisdom of Solomon, 2 Maccabees, and others) apparently were composed in Greek.[12]

    The authority of the larger group of "writings", out of which the ketuvim were selected, had not yet been determined, although some sort of selective process must have been employed because the Septuagint did not include other well-known Jewish documents such as Enoch or Jubilees or other writings that are now part of the Pseudepigrapha. It is not known what principles were used to determine the contents of the Septuagint beyond the "Law and the Prophets", a phrase used several times in the New Testament.




    And about the show and tell for the bible?

    The Bible refers to one of two closely related religious texts central to Judaism and Christianity—the Hebrew or Christian sacred scriptures respectively.

    The Hebrew Bible, composed between the 14th and 5th centuries BCE, is the main source for the history of ancient Israel. The five books of the Torah comprise the origins of the Israelite nation and its covenant with God. The Prophets consist of prophetic and ethical teachings, as well as the historic account of Israel. The Writings such as Psalms and Job are poetic and philosophical works. Israelite historians presented a picture of the ancient nation based on information that they viewed as historically accurate. Like modern historians, Hebrew writers provided historical explanations or background information of the events they describe (e.g., 1 Sam. 28:3, 1 Kings 18:3b, 2 Kings 9:14b-15a, 13:5-6, 15:12, 17:7-23).[1]
    Judaism recognizes a single set of canonical books known as the Tanakh, also called Hebrew Bible, traditionally divided into three parts: the Torah ("teaching" or "law"), the Nevi'im ("prophets"), and the Ketuvim ("writings").

    The Bible as used by Christians adopted the Jewish, or Hebrew Bible into its canon, classifying it as the "Old Testament". Soon after the establishment of Christianity in the first century, Church fathers compiled Gospel accounts, and letters of apostles into a Christian Bible, in addition to the adopted Jewish Bible. This became known as the New Testament. The two together are referred to as "The Bible" by Christians. The canonical composition of the Jewish Bible is in dispute between Christian groups: Protestants hold only the books of the Hebrew Bible to be canonical; Roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox additionally consider the deuterocanonical books, a group of Jewish books, to be canonical. The New Testament is comprised of the Gospels ("good news"), the Acts of the Apostles, the Epistles (letters), and the Book of Revelation.

    The term "bible" is sometimes used to refer to any central text of a religion, or a comprehensive guidebook on a particular subject.
    The Bible refers to one of two closely related religious texts central to Judaism and Christianity—the Hebrew or Christian sacred scriptures respectively.

    The Hebrew Bible, composed between the 14th and 5th centuries BCE, is the main source for the history of ancient Israel. The five books of the Torah comprise the origins of the Israelite nation and its covenant with God. The Prophets consist of prophetic and ethical teachings, as well as the historic account of Israel. The Writings such as Psalms and Job are poetic and philosophical works. Israelite historians presented a picture of the ancient nation based on information that they viewed as historically accurate. Like modern historians, Hebrew writers provided historical explanations or background information of the events they describe (e.g., 1 Sam. 28:3, 1 Kings 18:3b, 2 Kings 9:14b-15a, 13:5-6, 15:12, 17:7-23).[1]Judaism recognizes a single set of canonical books known as the Tanakh, also called Hebrew Bible, traditionally divided into three parts: the Torah ("teaching" or "law"), the Nevi'im ("prophets"), and the Ketuvim ("writings").

    The Bible as used by Christians adopted the Jewish, or Hebrew Bible into its canon, classifying it as the "Old Testament". Soon after the establishment of Christianity in the first century, Church fathers compiled Gospel accounts, and letters of apostles into a Christian Bible, in addition to the adopted Jewish Bible. This became known as the New Testament. The two together are referred to as "The Bible" by Christians. The canonical composition of the Jewish Bible is in dispute between Christian groups: Protestants hold only the books of the Hebrew Bible to be canonical; Roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox additionally consider the deuterocanonical books, a group of Jewish books, to be canonical. The New Testament is comprised of the Gospels ("good news"), the Acts of the Apostles, the Epistles (letters), and the Book of Revelation.

    The term "bible" is sometimes used to refer to any central text of a religion, or a comprehensive guidebook on a particular subject.
Sign In or Register to comment.