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HIP-HOP COMMUNITY, STAND UP!!! AND SUPPORT #Trayvon Martin

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  • waterproof
    waterproof Conqueror of Self On The Road to ZionMembers Posts: 9,412 ✭✭✭✭✭
    After some deep thought, I have come to the conclusion that "George Zimmerman" is either under the witness protection with the U.S. Marshalls or a federal informant. A. What Hispanic male name is George Zimmerman. B. No one sees this guy commute to and from a place of employment C. All of his past offenses have ended in his charges being ultimately dropped, for no other reason but the sake of being dropped. We need some paper work on this cat for real

    I agree he just felled the face of the earth, nobody seen him or heard from him, somebody is protecting him and i think the US Marshall is hiding him. And there's need to be a deep look into his background
  • waterproof
    waterproof Conqueror of Self On The Road to ZionMembers Posts: 9,412 ✭✭✭✭✭
    BLACK RIGHT WING ACTIVIST COONING FOR ACCEPTENCE

    Jesse+Lee+Peterson1.jpg


    As we have noted several times in the past, Jesse Lee Peterson of the Brotherhood Organization of a New Destiny (BOND) has carved out a very unique niche as a black right-wing activist who specializes in accusing Democrats, and especially black Democrats, of being racist while defending white people who are accused of racism.

    Earlier this year, Peterson made news when he declared that he would like "to take all black people back to the South and put them on the plantation so they would understand the ethic of working." So it comes as no surprise that Peterson has now decided to weigh in on the Trayvon Martin tragedy by declaring that the outrage over his death is not about justice but rather "about getting even with whites and gaining political power":


    "It's hypocritical for so-called black 'leaders' to call for the prosecution of George Zimmerman and accuse the police of racism without knowing the facts. Black-on-black crime takes place every day. And blacks 🤬 whites in far greater numbers than whites 🤬 blacks. Yet, we only see these leaders and their hypnotized black followers worked up when a black is victimized by another race. This is racist and evil.

    "Where were the NAACP, Al Sharpton, the Black Caucus and black ministers when black flash mobs were terrorizing the city of Philadelphia and attacking whites and others? It was so bad that Mayor Michael 🤬 threatened to jail parents if they were not willing to get their thug children under control. In Kansas City, a 13-year-old white kid was attacked by two black teens who poured gasoline on him and set him on fire saying, 'you get what you deserve, white boy.' If these leaders were sincere, they would condemn crime across the board.

    "I've said for the last 22 years that most black Americans are brainwashed. The recent actions of these black leaders and their followers are not about justice—it's about getting even with whites and gaining political power. This is black hatred of white people and a result of more than fifty years of brainwashing by racist civil-rights leaders.

    .
  • waterproof
    waterproof Conqueror of Self On The Road to ZionMembers Posts: 9,412 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The Right Goes Nuts Over Obama's Trayvon Comments

    President Barack Obama spoke to the press about slain Florida teen Trayvon Martin on Friday morning, saying, "When I think about that boy, I think about my own kids.... If I had a son, he'd look like Trayvon. I think they are right to expect that all of us as Americans are going to take this with the seriousness this deserves and get to the bottom of what happened."

    That was enough to cause some corners of the conservative media to go nuts.

    Following along with theme of racial paranoia set by Glenn Beck's website The Blaze, conservative media icon Matt Drudge's page stoked fears of "retaliation," citing Louis Farrakhan. Conservative columnist Michelle Malkin accused Obama of "political opportunism" and trying to "pour gas on the fire" for empathizing with Martin's parents. The Daily Caller appears to have discovered the Trayvon Martin case on Thursday of this week, but it had already decided that the most important angle was what the New Black Panther Party thought. Perhaps that was to lay the groundwork for Friday's piece by Matthew Boyle, which implies a causal link between the Panthers' outrage and Obama's remarks on the subject. Going to the New Black Panthers to find out what black people think is like going to the Ku Klux 🤬 to find out what white people think, except if the KKK were a bunch of clowns who no one cares about instead of a group with a history of racist terrorism.

    Obama isn't the first national political figure to weigh in on the Martin case, but he's the first to generate a spasm of outrage from the conservative media, which up till now had remained mostly silent. Somehow, both Rep. Allen West (R-Fla.) and former Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice managed to weigh in on the Martin story, both in support of a federal investigation of the incident, without provoking right-wing speculation that they were in league with black separatists.

    Sadly, prior to Obama's remarks the Martin case had avoided being sucked into a partisan vortex. Fox News virtually ignored the issue, and National Review has published several well-considered pieces on the subject. On Friday, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) called Martin's death "an incredible tragedy" and said "I'm glad it's being investigated and we'll take a look at it as the investigation moves along."

    I would have preferred the president not weigh in on the Martin case, lest he taint a potential jury trial for George Zimmerman, who maintains he shot Martin in self-defense. But I also suspected that his silence prevented the whole incident from turning into a partisan food fight, with conservatives having to choose between common decency and agreeing with their hated enemy. Because it was obvious, when it came to that, what some of them would choose. Hopefully actual elected officials won't follow their lead.
  • StillFaggyAF
    StillFaggyAF Queer LGBT CommunityMembers Posts: 40,358 ✭✭✭✭✭
    in a nother thread errybody was mad about obama NOT saying anything. look now
  • waterproof
    waterproof Conqueror of Self On The Road to ZionMembers Posts: 9,412 ✭✭✭✭✭






    WATCH THIS POWERFUL SPEECH BY THE REV. AL SHARPTON

    MOTHER OF TRAYVON

    FATHER OF TRAYVON

    I AM A FAN OF BROTHER Michael Baisden LISTENS TO HIS SHOW ON-LINE

    CONGRESS MAN AL GREEN AND MARTIN LUTHER KING III







  • infamous114
    infamous114 Down in Miami where it's warm in the winter. Members, Moderators Posts: 52,202 Regulator
    r-TRAYVON-MARTIN-MIAMI-SCHOOL-WALKOUTS-SOUTHRIDGE-large570.jpg

    At Miami Southridge High School
  • waterproof
    waterproof Conqueror of Self On The Road to ZionMembers Posts: 9,412 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Geraldo Rivera: Trayvon Martin's 'Hoodie Is As Much Responsible For [His] Death As George Zimmerman

    Geraldo Rivera provoked outrage on Friday when he said that slain teenager Trayvon Martin was partially responsible for his death because he was wearing a hoodie. The Fox News host later revealed that even his own son was dismayed by the comments.

    Speaking on Friday's "Fox and Friends," Rivera said, ""I think the hoodie is as much responsible for Trayvon Martin’s death as George Zimmerman was."

    Martin was unarmed when he was shot dead by a self-appointed neighborhood watch volunteer named George Zimmerman in late February. His death has become a national tragedy, fueled by the police's controversial handling of the case.

    After making his original comments about Martin's hoodie on Friday morning, Rivera weighed in again in a series of tweets. He revealed that his own son — whom he referenced when speaking about Martin — disagreed. "My own son just wrote to say he's ashamed of my position re hoodies," he tweeted.

    However, he maintained that Martin's hoodie was to blame for his death. He denied that he was "blaming the victim" and called it "common sense" for minorities to avoid wearing hoodies. He said that he was "reminding minority parents of the risk that comes with being a kid of color in America."

    Rivera made his original comments to Brian Kilmeade, Steve Doocy and guest host Juliet Huddy. He said that he believed George Zimmerman should be "investigated to the fullest extent of the law" and "prosecuted" if criminally liable, but blamed Martin's parents for letting him go outside wearing a hoodie.

    "But I am urging the parents of black and Latino youngsters particularly to not let their children go out wearing hoodies," Rivera insisted.

    When asked to clarify his remarks, Rivera said that he cautioned his own son against wearing hoodies. He explained, "When you, when you see a kid walking — Juliet — when you see a kid walking down the street, particularly a dark skinned kid like my son Cruz, who I constantly yelled at when he was going out wearing a damn hoodie or those pants around his ankles. Take that hood off, people look at you and they — what do they think? What’s the instant identification, what’s the instant association?"

    "Uh-oh," remarked Doocy, who nodded in agreement.

    Rivera argued that avoiding certain types of attire was a necessary deterrent against racial profiling. "It’s those crime scene surveillance tapes. Every time you see someone sticking up a 7-11, the kid is wearing a hoodie," Rivera said. "You have to recognize that this whole stylizing yourself as a gangster, you're gonna be a gangster wannabe? Well, people are gonna perceive you as a menace."

    He stressed that Martin was an "innocent" and "wonderful" kid who "didn't deserve to die." However, he reiterated, "I'll bet you money, if he didn't have that hoodie on, that nutty neighborhood watch guy wouldn't have responded in that violent and aggressive way."

    Rivera prefaced his "Fox and Friends" appearance with similar comments on Twitter on Thursday night. He had tweeted, "His hoodie killed Trayvon Martin as surely as George Zimmerman," and "I'm trying to save lives like Trayvon's-Parents Alert: hoodies can get your kid killed."

    Moments before he died, Martin was on the phone with his girlfriend. She recalled him saying that he put his hoodie up because Zimmerman had been following him

  • H-Rap 180
    H-Rap 180 Members Posts: 15,452 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Well now Obama chimed in.
  • rip.dilla
    rip.dilla ... push up the fader... bust the meter... shake the tweeter Members Posts: 17,412 ✭✭✭✭✭
    LOL. He had to

    It became bigger than he thought it would

    It ain't no longer a "state issue"
  • nujerz84
    nujerz84 NJMembers Posts: 15,418 ✭✭✭✭✭
    no surprise the Right would try to twist Obama words...
  • DOPEdweebz
    DOPEdweebz What title? www.facebook.com/DOPEdweebzMembers, Moderators, Writer Posts: 29,364 Regulator
    Watch the white people come out with ...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frGLMtGsotc
    
  • waterproof
    waterproof Conqueror of Self On The Road to ZionMembers Posts: 9,412 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Trayvon Case Not Exactly Top Priority for Florida's GOP Governor

    Between school prayer, drug testing state employees, and fighting Obamacare, Rick Scott has had a few other things going on.

    Last Monday, Rick Scott—Florida's beleaguered freshman tea party governor—made a powerful executive decision: He signed legislation to require drug tests of state employees. On Friday, he acted decisively and signed a controversial pro-school-prayer bill into law. His top cop, Republican Attorney General Pam Bondi, spent the week on one of her top priorities: promoting the state's Supreme Court case against President Obama's health care reforms. The state's Republican Party this week also began airing a new pro-Scott ad, two years ahead of his next election, and Scott's also taken to bragging about his recent legislative accomplishments.

    Somewhere in there, the governor addressed Trayvon Martin's killing.

    Read the latest updates and a full explainer on Trayvon Martin's killing.

    As the public furor grows over Martin's shooting and the fate of his killer, Scott—one of the nation's least popular governors, and host of the Republican presidential convention this summer—seems to be struggling with how to respond to the case. It's not that he's done nothing. Last Monday, about the same time the Justice Department expressed its interest in Trayvon's case, he sent a one-paragraph letter to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (the state's FBI) directing the agency to investigate. He met with a group of protesters on Tuesday—though he didn't accede to their wishes to set up a task force on racial profiling.

    In Scott's most substantive moves, he appointed a new special prosecutor to the case after meeting with Martin's family, and he's agreed to set up a task force that will investigate the state's expansive "stand your ground" self-defense law. But Scott's chosen prosecutor has been attacked by a respected law school dean as having "no enthusiasm for defending citizens," and the task force will be led by his lieutenant governor, with its members picked by Bondi and four top state legislators—all of them pro-gun Republicans. Scott signaled that the task force would tread carefully on Second Amendment ground, saying in a statement that it would "investigate how to make sure a tragedy such as this does not occur in the future, while at the same time, protecting the fundamental rights of all of our citizens—especially the right to feel protected and safe in our state."

    As a result of these moves and his other recent legislative priorities, it's been difficult to gauge just how much interest the governor takes in Trayvon's case. But since taking office 14 months ago, he's made serious missteps before when attempting to engage Florida's minorities; they reacted harshly to his gutting of public schools and social services, his drive for prison privatization and voting-rights restrictions, and his push to drug-test welfare recipients at their expense. He's also been criticized for passing over minorities in his Cabinet and judicial appointments. In December, he tried to connect with a group of black student protesters by mentioning that he'd once lived in public housing. ("We're not poor!" one of them shouted back.)

    Thus far, his reaction to Martin's death has done little to stem the old criticisms. "If I were governor, I would be out front saying... we're going to be very aggressive about holding the FDLE accountable for reviewing the Sanford Police Department," Alex Sink—the Democratic gubernatorial candidate who lost to Scott in 2010—told a St. Petersburg crowd this week. "You wouldn't be getting some made-up statement from the press shop of the governor." She added: "In my opinion, if this had been a black man with a gun shooting a young, 17-year-old white boy, there's no doubt that the shooter would be in jail today."

    That may be political hay from a once-and-future state candidate, but Sink is not the only one suggesting that Scott's lacking in sensitivity where minorities are concerned. Last year, when Scott demurred about his lack of black judicial appointees (and said he "took a risk" on his black lieutenant governor, Jennifer Carroll), Sen. Arthenia Joyner (D-Tampa) knocked his administration for "monolithic thinking," adding, "there's no room for a diversity of thought." At another dinner with black leaders where he recycled his public housing line, black lawmakers again grumbled. "He assumed that everyone (in the room) was poor and that can only be because you're black," Betty Reid (D-Tampa) said.

    Curious to see how the governor fields questions about the Martin case in real time? He'll appear on CNN's State of the Union Sunday.
  • waterproof
    waterproof Conqueror of Self On The Road to ZionMembers Posts: 9,412 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Meet the Obama Official Investigating the Trayvon Martin Shooting

    Tom Perez, the Justice Department's top civil rights lawyer, has investigated hate crimes and police abuses for years. Now he faces one of his biggest challenges yet.


    On Tuesday, city officials from Sanford, Florida, trekked to Washington for a meeting on Capitol Hill with a group of black lawmakers and officials of the Justice Department's civil rights division. The topic at hand: The recently announced investigation of the killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, who was fatally shot in late February by George Zimmerman, a self-appointed neighborhood watch captain, while walking back to his father's house in a gated community from a local convenience store.

    Sanford Mayor Jeff Triplet told the group he'd spent the last few days listening repeatedly to the recording of Zimmerman's 911 call, according to Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-Fla.), who was present at the meeting. After the shooting, Zimmerman told the police that Martin had attacked him and he had acted in self-defense. Apparently believing his version of events, the Sanford police did not arrest him. But the 911 tape suggested that Zimmerman had pursued Martin, even though he had been warned against doing so by the 911 dispatcher.

    When Hastings suggested that Zimmerman might have uttered a racial slur on the call, Triplet pulled a copy of the recording out of a folder and passed it to the DOJ's assistant attorney general for civil rights, Thomas Perez. Sanford's city manager, Norton Bonaparte, implored Perez to probe the conduct of the Sanford police.

    The inquiry being conducted by Perez's division and the FBI is focused on the actual shooting, in part to determine whether it was a hate crime. But as questions continue to emerge about the Sanford police department's handling of this and other racially-charged cases, civil rights leaders have urged the feds to broaden the inquiry to include a civil investigation into possible police wrongdoing. And this is an area Perez knows well. During his two-year tenure at the civil rights division, he has quietly led a federal crusade against police misconduct, pursuing 19 investigations of local police departments—the most in the division's history.

    "During the Bush administration [police misconduct] was not a high priority," says Richard Jerome, a former Justice Department attorney who now runs the Public Safety Performance Project at the Pew Center on the States. "There certainly were not only fewer cases but the end result of the cases were different."

    Using its authority to compel institutional changes in local law enforcement agencies that have engaged in systemic violations of Americans' constitutional rights, Perez's office has helped to overhaul the police department of Puerto Rico and New Orleans police force. (New Orleans police officers shot several civilians in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.) It has scrutinized the Miami and Seattle police departments and exposed the civil rights abuses of Arizona's notorious anti-immigrant Sheriff Joe Arpaio.
    .

    But the inquiry into Trayvon Martin's death will likely be one of the most high-profile cases of Perez's tenure, spotlighting a division that just a few years ago was considered among the most politicized sections of the Justice Department.

    When Perez took over the civil rights division in 2009, he inherited a demoralized staff that was suffering something akin to PTSD. During the Bush era, political appointees had tried to purge the office of career attorneys they deemed insufficiently conservative and punish those who hung on to their jobs. In the early months of Perez's tenure, it was not unusual for staffers to break down in his office, recalling past traumas.

    "It felt like grief counseling," says Samuel Bagenstos, who served as Perez's principal deputy until last August.

    Restoring the division to its role as "the conscience of the Justice Department," as Eric Holder had put it during his confirmation hearing, was a priority of the Obama administration. And choosing Perez, a former career prosecutor who was hired during the George H.W. Bush administration and who used to bust 🤬 cops and white supremacists, was meant to send the message that it was truly a new day for the division.

    "There's a long bipartisan tradition of civil rights enforcement," Perez says, "I worked here under Bush I; that [politicization] never happened [then]."

    Last month, in an interview with Mother Jones in his Justice Department office, he reflected on his return to the division. Slim and goateed, the 52-year old was nursing a limp—an injury he promptly turned into a punch line.

    "I'm often accused of hiring people with civil rights experience, and I do plead guilty to that," Perez quips, referring to conservative criticism that he has stacked the division with liberals. (Perez has indeed changed hiring practices at the division by putting career attorneys—not political appointees—back in charge of the hiring process, and his right-wing critics claim this leads to hiring attorneys with civil rights experience who tend to be liberals.) "I'm having surgery on my knee next week," he adds, "and I'm not having a psychiatrist do it, I'm having a surgeon do it."

    Perez's parents were both exiles from the Dominican Republic. His maternal grandfather, a former ambassador to the United States, was exiled after he denounced Dominican dictator Raphael Trujillo's massacre of thousands of ethnic Haitians in 1937. Perez's father also fled the Trujillo regime, later joining the US Army as a surgeon.

    "There was a lot of lawlessness in the Dominican Republic," Perez says. "What my parents taught me was that the hallmark of a thriving democracy was an effective and respectful police force."

    Perez racked up a bunch of high profile cases while a young prosecutor in the division, including the conviction of several neo-Nazis in Texas who went on a murderous hate crime spree in an attempt to provoke a race war. That case netted him a Distinguished Service Award. After a detail on Senator Ted Kennedy's staff, he left the DOJ in the early 2000s to serve on the Montgomery County Council and on the board of a local immigrant rights group, CASA de Maryland.

    "He's always viewed it as his life's calling to help vulnerable people," says Leon Rodriguez, a longtime friend who now runs the civil rights office at the Department of Health and Human Services. Rodriguez previously worked under Perez at Justice, where Rodriguez helped organize a meeting between division attorneys and police chiefs across the country. Perez's "main message" to the chiefs, Rodriguez recalls, was, "I need to hear from you, I need to learn from you. You're the guys who live this every day." Attorneys in the division, who had been stymied during the Bush years, were looking to pursue police misconduct cases that had gone unaddressed. And Perez was looking for a way to conduct these probes vigorously but in a manner that would lead to more effective policing.

    The Justice Department has been a focus of conservative ire throughout the Obama administration, and Perez's nomination was held up for months by Senate Republicans trying to kneecap the president by blocking many of his executive appointments. (Senate conservatives were put off by his immigration work.) Perez could have taken his confirmation battle as a message to lay low and avoid ruffling conservative feathers. Instead, his division has taken an aggressive role in enforcing civil rights laws: blocking restrictive voting measures, securing big money settlements against banks peddling predatory loans to minority customers and service members, filing lawsuits on behalf of bullied 🤬 students, and fighting discrimination against the disabled.


  • waterproof
    waterproof Conqueror of Self On The Road to ZionMembers Posts: 9,412 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Article continues......

    "His tenure is a welcome contrast to the division under the previous administration, which too rarely addressed issues of civil rights and discrimination in a meaningful manner," says NAACP President Benjamin Jealous.

    The division has also taken on rising Islamophobia—intervening in a Tennessee case where local activists seeking to block construction of a mosque argued in court that Islam wasn't a religion and therefore mosques weren't entitled to federal exemptions from local zoning laws granted to religious buildings. Perez says his division's brief in the case, arguing that Islam is in fact a religion, was "one of the saddest I've had to file."

    But the division's unprecedented campaign against police abuses has largely transpired under the radar. But that could all change with the Trayvon Martin case. The Sanford police chief temporarily stepped down on Wednesday, but the local NAACP chapter says the town has a history of discriminatory policing.

    In recent meetings with civil rights leaders and legislators, Perez has emphasized that the bar for prosecuting Zimmerman under federal hate crimes law is high. But civil rights groups, including the NAACP, have been pushing the division to pursue a broader investigation covering the practices of the Sanford police. In a sign that he has truly turned around the division, Perez has actually raised expectations.
  • waterproof
    waterproof Conqueror of Self On The Road to ZionMembers Posts: 9,412 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 2012
    Here's the Dominican Brother Thomas Perez who was sent by the DOJ and Eric Holder for the Trayvon Martin Case 082211-national-los-angeles-projects-thomas-perez.jpg the DOJ's assistant attorney general for civil rights, Thomas Perez


    OK this caught my eyes' and i feel a little better about this Domincan Brother "Perez's parents were both exiles from the Dominican Republic. His maternal grandfather, a former ambassador to the United States, was exiled after he denounced Dominican dictator Raphael Trujillo's massacre of thousands of ethnic Haitians in 1937"
    because let's be honest there's is some issues within the Domincan community and others Afro-Latin COmmunity about the issues with race and there's is some in the Dominican community that do not want nothing to do with their african ancestry, AND THERE IS SOME THAT EMBRACE THEIR AFRICAN ANCESTRY.
  • waterproof
    waterproof Conqueror of Self On The Road to ZionMembers Posts: 9,412 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 2012
    Is this this little to late for Sean Bell, do you think they see the National Movement for Trayvon Martin and feel that they will be next?? Even though it's years later.

    BREAKING NEWS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! NYPD Forces Out Cops in Sean Bell Shooting



    Three officers involved in the controversial Sean Bell shooting case will be forced out of the NYPD by Monday including one who will be fired, NBC New York has learned.

    NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly has upheld a departmental trial judge's ruling to fire Detective Gescard Isnora, sources said. Two others — Detective Michael Oliver and Detective Marc Cooper — are expected to report to the NYPD's pension board Monday to formally hand in their papers, sources said.

    Lieutenant Gary Napoli has also been forced to leave the NYPD. Napoli was a supervisor on scene but did not fire his weapon that night.

    NYPD spokesman Paul Browne confirmed the decision by Commissioner Kelly to fire Isnora saying, "There was nothing in the record to warrant overturning the decision of the Department's trial judge."

    One source said Isnora is not expected to be allowed to get a pension as a result of Kelly's ruling.

    "Little Less
    Grief" for Sean Bell's...

    Michael Palladino, the president of the Detective's Endowment Association, said the decision to terminate Isnora could be summed up in three words: "disgraceful, excessive and unprecedented."

    He added that "stripping a cop of his livelihood and his opportunity for a vested retirement is punishment reserved for a cop who has turned to a life of crime and disgraced the shield. It's not for someone who has acted within the law and was justified in a court of law and exonerated by the United States Department of Justice."

    Isnora was the detective who fired first in a 50-shot fusillade that killed 23-year-old Sean Bell — who was unarmed — on the eve of his wedding. The November 2006 shooting, which occurred outside a Queens strip club, also injured Joseph Guzman and Trent Benefield.

    Detectives Oliver, Isnora and Cooper were indicted but all were found not guilty at a 2008 trial.

    Sources familar with the case said that following an administrative trial, the NYPD placed Oliver on modified duty, stripping him of his gun and shield. He lost 60 days pay, forfeited all time and leave balances and was forced to retire.

    Cooper and Napoli, a supervisor who was at the scene but did not fire any shots, were also placed on modified duty. They lost 30 days vacation, and were also forced to forfeit all time and leave balances and retire. A fifth officer, Michael Carey, was cleard of all charges.

    Isnora had fought to keep his job but Deputy Commissioner Martin Karopkin ruled after the departmental trial that he be fired.


  • waterproof
    waterproof Conqueror of Self On The Road to ZionMembers Posts: 9,412 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Trayvon Shooter's 911 Calls: Potholes, Piles of Trash—and Black Men

    Police call logs show George Zimmerman was a man obsessed with suburban law-and-order minutiae—and black men stalking the neighborhood


    At 9:02 p.m. on September 21, 2005, he called 911 about a stray dog on Skyline Drive. At 7:22 p.m. on St. Patrick's Day, 2005, he called 911 about a "pothole that is blocking [the] road." Then there was the pile of trash in the road near the local Kohl's, which he reported on Nov. 8, 2010. "[Complainant] states it appears recently dumped and appears to contain glass," the dispatcher dutifully reported.

    A new 47-page document, quietly dumped online by the city of Sanford, details some of the phone calls George Zimmerman made to emergency dispatchers in Seminole County, Florida. Zimmerman, a self-styled neighborhood watch captain in his Orlando suburb, shot 17-year-old African American Trayvon Martin dead last month after reporting him to police as a suspicious person prowling the area. Zimmerman now claims Martin attacked him on the street, and he defended himself with deadly force.

    Read our full explainer and latest updates on the Trayvon Martin killing.

    But the newly released police calls paint Zimmerman as a man obsessed with law and order, with the minutiae of suburban life, and with black males.

    Most of the calls seem to cover mundanities: Zimmerman reported a male driving with no headlights; a yellow speedbike popping wheelies on I-4; an aggressive white-and-brown pitbull; an Orange County municipal pickup cutting people off on the road; loud parties; open garage doors; and the antics of an ex-roommate, Josh, that he'd thrown out of their apartment. On September 9, 2009, he called to report another pothole, this one on Greenwood road, advising the dispatcher that "it is deep and can cause damage to vehicles."

    He especially had concerns about kids in the neighborhood. On June 16, 2009, shortly after school had let out for the summer, he called to complain about six to eight youths playing basketball near his development's clubhouse, "jumping over the fence going into pool area and trashing the bathroom," according to the dispatcher's notes. This past January, he called to report five or six children, ages 4 to 11, playing in the neighborhood. The kids, he told a dispatcher, "play in the street and like to run out [in front of] cars."

    But when there weren't kids or garbage to report, he'd spend his evenings looking for would-be burglars. At 2:38 a.m. on Nov. 4, 2006, he called about a late-model Red Toyota pickup "driving real slow looking at all the [vehicles] in the complex and blasting music from his [vehicle]." It's not clear if Zimmerman feared the driver was a car thief, though car thieves tend not to blast music through the neighborhood while practicing their craft.

    But even more than cars, he was concerned about black men on foot in the neighborhood. In August 2011, he called to report a black male in a tank top and shorts acting suspicious near the development's back entrance. "[Complainant] believes [subject] is involved in recent S-21s"—break-ins—"in the neighborhood," the call log states. The suspect, Zimmerman told the dispatcher, fit a recent description given out by law enforcement officers.



    Three days later, he called to report two black teens in the same area, for the same reason. "[Juveniles] are the subjs who have been [burglarizing] in this area," he told the dispatcher.

    And last month, on Feb. 2, Zimmerman called to report a suspicious black man in a leather jacket near one of the development's units. The resident of that townhouse, Zimmerman told dispatch, was a white male. Police stopped by to investigate, but no one was there, and the residence was secure.

    After that, there's one final call logged in the report. At 7:11 on February 26, Zimmerman called police to report a black male in a dark gray hoodie. A few minutes later, that male—Trayvon Martin—lay dead on the sidewalk
  • MeekMonizzLLLLLLe14
    MeekMonizzLLLLLLe14 Members Posts: 15,337 ✭✭✭✭✭
    another thing
    waterproof wrote: »
    Geraldo Rivera: Trayvon Martin's 'Hoodie Is As Much Responsible For [His] Death As George Zimmerman

    Geraldo Rivera provoked outrage on Friday when he said that slain teenager Trayvon Martin was partially responsible for his death because he was wearing a hoodie. The Fox News host later revealed that even his own son was dismayed by the comments.

    Speaking on Friday's "Fox and Friends," Rivera said, ""I think the hoodie is as much responsible for Trayvon Martin’s death as George Zimmerman was."

    Martin was unarmed when he was shot dead by a self-appointed neighborhood watch volunteer named George Zimmerman in late February. His death has become a national tragedy, fueled by the police's controversial handling of the case.

    After making his original comments about Martin's hoodie on Friday morning, Rivera weighed in again in a series of tweets. He revealed that his own son — whom he referenced when speaking about Martin — disagreed. "My own son just wrote to say he's ashamed of my position re hoodies," he tweeted.

    However, he maintained that Martin's hoodie was to blame for his death. He denied that he was "blaming the victim" and called it "common sense" for minorities to avoid wearing hoodies. He said that he was "reminding minority parents of the risk that comes with being a kid of color in America."

    Rivera made his original comments to Brian Kilmeade, Steve Doocy and guest host Juliet Huddy. He said that he believed George Zimmerman should be "investigated to the fullest extent of the law" and "prosecuted" if criminally liable, but blamed Martin's parents for letting him go outside wearing a hoodie.

    "But I am urging the parents of black and Latino youngsters particularly to not let their children go out wearing hoodies," Rivera insisted.

    When asked to clarify his remarks, Rivera said that he cautioned his own son against wearing hoodies. He explained, "When you, when you see a kid walking — Juliet — when you see a kid walking down the street, particularly a dark skinned kid like my son Cruz, who I constantly yelled at when he was going out wearing a damn hoodie or those pants around his ankles. Take that hood off, people look at you and they — what do they think? What’s the instant identification, what’s the instant association?"

    "Uh-oh," remarked Doocy, who nodded in agreement.

    Rivera argued that avoiding certain types of attire was a necessary deterrent against racial profiling. "It’s those crime scene surveillance tapes. Every time you see someone sticking up a 7-11, the kid is wearing a hoodie," Rivera said. "You have to recognize that this whole stylizing yourself as a gangster, you're gonna be a gangster wannabe? Well, people are gonna perceive you as a menace."

    He stressed that Martin was an "innocent" and "wonderful" kid who "didn't deserve to die." However, he reiterated, "I'll bet you money, if he didn't have that hoodie on, that nutty neighborhood watch guy wouldn't have responded in that violent and aggressive way."

    Rivera prefaced his "Fox and Friends" appearance with similar comments on Twitter on Thursday night. He had tweeted, "His hoodie killed Trayvon Martin as surely as George Zimmerman," and "I'm trying to save lives like Trayvon's-Parents Alert: hoodies can get your kid killed."

    Moments before he died, Martin was on the phone with his girlfriend. She recalled him saying that he put his hoodie up because Zimmerman had been following him

    Ironically here is Rivera Wearing a hoodie himself

    oreilly_geraldo_mets_051807.jpg
  • StillDreaming
    StillDreaming Members Posts: 4,989 ✭✭✭
    Like honestly im trying but this whole situation is just filling me with rage. I have a son on the way right now and i can only imagine what Trayvons parents must b going thru. Its getting to the point where i really hate being from this country
  • infamous114
    infamous114 Down in Miami where it's warm in the winter. Members, Moderators Posts: 52,202 Regulator
    edited March 2012
    I read an article where a person who witnessed the whole scene said Trayvon was the one attacking Zimmerman.
    Witness: Martin attacked Zimmerman

    Updated: Friday, 23 Mar 2012, 6:19 PM EDT
    Published : Friday, 23 Mar 2012, 5:47 PM EDT

    ORLANDO - A witness we haven't heard from before paints a much different picture than we've seen so far of what happened the night 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was shot and killed.

    The night of that shooting, police say there was a witness who saw it all.

    Our sister station, FOX 35 in Orlando, has spoken to that witness.

    What Sanford Police investigators have in the folder, they put together on the killing of Trayvon Martin few know about.

    The file now sits in the hands of the state attorney. Now that file is just weeks away from being opened to a grand jury.

    It shows more now about why police believed that night that George Zimmerman shouldn't have gone to jail.

    Zimmerman called 911 and told dispatchers he was following a teen. The dispatcher told Zimmerman not to.

    And from that moment to the shooting, details are few.

    But one man's testimony could be key for the police.

    "The guy on the bottom who had a red sweater on was yelling to me: 'help, help…and I told him to stop and I was calling 911," he said.

    Trayvon Martin was in a hoodie; Zimmerman was in red.

    The witness only wanted to be identified as "John," and didn't not want to be shown on camera.

    His statements to police were instrumental, because police backed up Zimmerman's claims, saying those screams on the 911 call are those of Zimmerman.

    "When I got upstairs and looked down, the guy who was on top beating up the other guy, was the one laying in the grass, and I believe he was dead at that point," John said.

    Zimmerman says the shooting was self defense. According to information released on the Sanford city website, Zimmerman said he was going back to his SUV when he was attacked by the teen.

    Sanford police say Zimmerman was 🤬 in his face and head, and the back of his shirt was wet and had grass stains, indicating a struggle took place before the shooting.
  • StillFaggyAF
    StillFaggyAF Queer LGBT CommunityMembers Posts: 40,358 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I read an article where a person who witnessed the whole scene said Trayvon was the one attacking Zimmerman.
    Witness: Martin attacked Zimmerman

    Updated: Friday, 23 Mar 2012, 6:19 PM EDT
    Published : Friday, 23 Mar 2012, 5:47 PM EDT

    ORLANDO - A witness we haven't heard from before paints a much different picture than we've seen so far of what happened the night 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was shot and killed.

    The night of that shooting, police say there was a witness who saw it all.

    Our sister station, FOX 35 in Orlando, has spoken to that witness.

    What Sanford Police investigators have in the folder, they put together on the killing of Trayvon Martin few know about.

    The file now sits in the hands of the state attorney. Now that file is just weeks away from being opened to a grand jury.

    It shows more now about why police believed that night that George Zimmerman shouldn't have gone to jail.

    Zimmerman called 911 and told dispatchers he was following a teen. The dispatcher told Zimmerman not to.

    And from that moment to the shooting, details are few.

    But one man's testimony could be key for the police.

    "The guy on the bottom who had a red sweater on was yelling to me: 'help, help…and I told him to stop and I was calling 911," he said.

    Trayvon Martin was in a hoodie; Zimmerman was in red.

    The witness only wanted to be identified as "John," and didn't not want to be shown on camera.

    His statements to police were instrumental, because police backed up Zimmerman's claims, saying those screams on the 911 call are those of Zimmerman.

    "When I got upstairs and looked down, the guy who was on top beating up the other guy, was the one laying in the grass, and I believe he was dead at that point," John said.

    Zimmerman says the shooting was self defense. According to information released on the Sanford city website, Zimmerman said he was going back to his SUV when he was attacked by the teen.

    Sanford police say Zimmerman was 🤬 in his face and head, and the back of his shirt was wet and had grass stains, indicating a struggle took place before the shooting.

    Zimmerman pursued and confront Martin, negating any protection from Stand Your Ground laws.
  • infamous114
    infamous114 Down in Miami where it's warm in the winter. Members, Moderators Posts: 52,202 Regulator
    I read an article where a person who witnessed the whole scene said Trayvon was the one attacking Zimmerman.
    Witness: Martin attacked Zimmerman

    Updated: Friday, 23 Mar 2012, 6:19 PM EDT
    Published : Friday, 23 Mar 2012, 5:47 PM EDT

    ORLANDO - A witness we haven't heard from before paints a much different picture than we've seen so far of what happened the night 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was shot and killed.

    The night of that shooting, police say there was a witness who saw it all.

    Our sister station, FOX 35 in Orlando, has spoken to that witness.

    What Sanford Police investigators have in the folder, they put together on the killing of Trayvon Martin few know about.

    The file now sits in the hands of the state attorney. Now that file is just weeks away from being opened to a grand jury.

    It shows more now about why police believed that night that George Zimmerman shouldn't have gone to jail.

    Zimmerman called 911 and told dispatchers he was following a teen. The dispatcher told Zimmerman not to.

    And from that moment to the shooting, details are few.

    But one man's testimony could be key for the police.

    "The guy on the bottom who had a red sweater on was yelling to me: 'help, help…and I told him to stop and I was calling 911," he said.

    Trayvon Martin was in a hoodie; Zimmerman was in red.

    The witness only wanted to be identified as "John," and didn't not want to be shown on camera.

    His statements to police were instrumental, because police backed up Zimmerman's claims, saying those screams on the 911 call are those of Zimmerman.

    "When I got upstairs and looked down, the guy who was on top beating up the other guy, was the one laying in the grass, and I believe he was dead at that point," John said.

    Zimmerman says the shooting was self defense. According to information released on the Sanford city website, Zimmerman said he was going back to his SUV when he was attacked by the teen.

    Sanford police say Zimmerman was 🤬 in his face and head, and the back of his shirt was wet and had grass stains, indicating a struggle took place before the shooting.

    Zimmerman pursued and confront Martin, negating any protection from Stand Your Ground laws.

    True....good point.
  • infamous114
    infamous114 Down in Miami where it's warm in the winter. Members, Moderators Posts: 52,202 Regulator
  • MeekMonizzLLLLLLe14
    MeekMonizzLLLLLLe14 Members Posts: 15,337 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Like honestly im trying but this whole situation is just filling me with rage. I have a son on the way right now and i can only imagine what Trayvons parents must b going thru. Its getting to the point where i really hate being from this country

    but this terrible situation makes me glad i live in this country....imagine if this 🤬 happened in England or France or Holland where racism is much more crueler and worse and hidden. As upset that I am about this situation its nice to see people of all races and walks of life outraged that this happened. Yes there are those bigots that will make excuses for zimmerman behind a computer and some on fox news that blame the "hoodie".

    But at the same time this 🤬 is getting coverage and it will lead to Zimmerman's arrest. My great grandmother died 3 years ago but over a decade ago she talked about how she saw people get lynched and nothing could be done to change that. Media did not cover that and the voice of those in the Jim Crow south was never heard. But Treyvon's voice is being heard and i am sure justice will come. Its allot slower than it should come but it will come.

  • infamous114
    infamous114 Down in Miami where it's warm in the winter. Members, Moderators Posts: 52,202 Regulator
    Monizzle14 wrote: »
    Like honestly im trying but this whole situation is just filling me with rage. I have a son on the way right now and i can only imagine what Trayvons parents must b going thru. Its getting to the point where i really hate being from this country

    but this terrible situation makes me glad i live in this country....imagine if this 🤬 happened in England or France or Holland where racism is much more crueler and worse and hidden. As upset that I am about this situation its nice to see people of all races and walks of life outraged that this happened. Yes there are those bigots that will make excuses for zimmerman behind a computer and some on fox news that blame the "hoodie".

    But at the same time this 🤬 is getting coverage and it will lead to Zimmerman's arrest. My great grandmother died 3 years ago but over a decade ago she talked about how she saw people get lynched and nothing could be done to change that. Media did not cover that and the voice of those in the Jim Crow south was never heard. But Treyvon's voice is being heard and i am sure justice will come. Its allot slower than it should come but it will come.

    Word...that's why I scratch my head when Gee says America is the most racist country. There is no denying that this country has an ugly and stained history but Europe is worse.