What's up everyone. We are doing a contest with T.I. and we are giving away $1200 a day for the next 10 days. Just wanted to give you all a heads up.
https://www.allhiphop.com/ti

My Top Ten Heels of All Time

genocidecutter
genocidecutter Members Posts: 17,825 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited September 2012 in Off The Turn Buckle
Its ranking time but, were doing something different this time.

Comments

  • genocidecutter
    genocidecutter Members Posts: 17,825 ✭✭✭✭✭
    10. Muhammed Hassen
    Muhammad-Hassan.jpg
    Though he would make his pro-wrestling debut in 2003 in OVW his greatest claim to fame would be a year later on December 13, 2004 in an in-ring segment with 🤬 Foley. He described himself as a Middle Eastern-American wrestler wanting relief from the increased stereotypes created by the 9/11 attacks, as he enters professional wrestling. He quickly rise to the top of the RAW roster and have matches with top talent such as Shawn Micheals, Jerry Lawler(Hope he gets well) and even Hulk Hogan at Wrestlemania. On June 20, Hassan and Daivari interrupted a promo by WWE Champion John Cena to complain about how Hassan was "screwed" out of the Intercontinental Title; Bischoff took the opportunity to punish Cena by booking him against Hassan in a WWE Title defense. Hassan's losing streak in title matches continued as Cena dominated him in a two-minute squash match, pinning him cleanly and thus ending his "unpinned" streak.
    He would later be drafted to smackdown and it all go downhill from there. On the episode of SmackDown! taped on July 4, General Manager Theodore Long put Muhammad Hassan in a match against The Undertaker at The Great American Bash and placed Daivari in a match that night against the Undertaker. Daivari was defeated easily, but Hassan began to "pray" on the ramp, summoning five masked men, dressed in black shirts, ski-masks, and camo pants. Armed with clubs and a piano wire, they beat and choked the Undertaker out, and Hassan put him in the Camel Clutch. Afterward, the masked men lifted Daivari above their heads and carried him away (See segment here). Three days later, hours before the episode was scheduled to air, the London bombings took place. Without sufficient time to properly edit the segment out of the show, UPN showed the footage unedited in the United States and on The Score in Canada with an advisory warning shown several times during the broadcast. It was removed from the Australian and European (including in the UK) broadcasts.
    The angle elicited national attention in the New York Post, TV Guide, Variety, and other major media outlets. In response to the criticism, UPN decided that it would monitor the storyline closely and that it did not want the Hassan character on its network that week. Hassan later delivered a promo to the live crowd for the July 14 airing of SmackDown!, but when UPN announced that the segment would be edited, WWE decided to host the video of the segment on its official website. In the segment, Hassan, reiterates that he is an Arab-American and that the American people automatically and unfairly assume that he is a terrorist. Despite being in character, he referred to the real-world media coverage of the storyline, singling out the New York Post's Don Kaplan by name, and denouncing his description of the events on SmackDown!, such as Kaplan's comment of the masked men being "Arabs in ski masks" (See segment here). On the July 14 episode of SmackDown!, Hassan's absence was explained by a statement delivered by his lawyer, which said that Hassan refused to appear on the show until that month's Great American Bash due to the way he had been treated by the media and WWE fans.
    It was revealed in late July 2005 that UPN had pressured WWE to keep Hassan off of their network, effectively removing him from SmackDown!. Hassan lost the match to The Undertaker at The Great American Bash. Copani was released from his WWE contract on September 21, 2005.


    http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x99b01_great-american-bash-undertaker-vs-m_sport
  • genocidecutter
    genocidecutter Members Posts: 17,825 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 2012
    9.Raven
    raven.jpg
    After using wrestling in WCW, WWF and SMW as many failed gimmicks in 1995 Scott Levy would finally develop a gimmick that worked. Raven had a stoic manner, and delivered eloquent, philosophical promos which included many literary allusions and ended with the catchphrase, "Quoth the Raven, 'Nevermore'." He made his debut with Stevie Richards, attacking Tommy Dreamer and claiming Dreamer was his enemy when they were children at summer camp. Another major ECW feud was with Sandman. Raven "brainwashed" Sandman's real-life son to join his cult-like following and turned him against his father. Raven got at Sandman by having his son deny his relationship with his father and perform Raven's taunt Crucifix, to slowly eat away at Sandman's psyche. This led to many 🤬 matches, culminating in an October 1996 match in which Sandman's son interfered to help his father. After the match, the two embraced, but Raven came from behind with a Kendo Stick, and brutalized Sandman then piledriving him through the table. Raven's lackeys, Steven Richards and the Blue Meanie, pulled out a giant wooden cross from under the ring, tied Sandman down to it, and lifted it up and "crucified" him(WWF would later copy this with an angle for the undertaker). Raven dominated ECW throughout 1995–1996 and enjoyed two reigns as ECW World Heavyweight Champion. His group of followers became known as the Raven's Nest. During his first stint in ECW, Raven successfully defended the ECW World Heavyweight Title against famous veterans Terry Gordy and "Dr. Death" Steve Williams, among others. He gave Dr. Death his first loss in a singles match in the U.S. in many years.
    On June 30, 1997, Levy made his return to WCW as Raven. He was seen sitting in the front row at WCW Monday Nitro where the commentators acknowledged him as "a man who has been a champion with other organizations". On August 21, 1997 at Clash of the Champions XXXV, Raven defeated Stevie Richards in an "unsanctioned" match and then took a seat in the front row. The storyline continued that Raven would frequently appear in the front row for the next few months with his lackeys, slowly forming what would be known as The Flock. Raven was an "unsigned free agent", but eventually accepted a contract with WCW Commissioner James J. Dillon which stipulated that he could wrestle only when he wanted and under his own rules. The Flock was a stable of misfits in the same vein as the Raven's Nest group in ECW. With The Flock, however, Raven was more openly abusive and controlling, which eventually led to dissension and rebellion. The group's matches were held under Raven's Rules, which meant no disqualifications—weapon usage, double teaming, and outside interference were rampant. He would remain a mid carder for remainder of his stint in WCW.
    As a condition to leaving WCW, Levy was not allowed to directly join the World Wrestling Federation upon leaving the promotion as levied by a no compete clause in his contract. Via a loophole in the contract, Levy rejoined ECW and signed a one-year contract on August 25, 1999. Raven made a surprise return on ECW's debut on TNN and won the tag team title from the departing Dudley Boyz along with Tommy Dreamer on August 26, 1999. A reluctant tag team, Raven and Dreamer reigned as ECW World Tag Team Champions for several months. When they lost the belts, they feuded briefly. Raven and Mike Awesome won the tag team title from Tanaka and Dreamer on March 4, 2000, only to lose them a week later to The Impact Players at Living Dangerously. CyberSlam 2000 was Raven's last ECW appearance with Francine, as she aligned with Justin Credible that evening. His last televised match was against Scotty Anton, which Raven lost. Shortly thereafter, he departed for the WWF.
    In 2000 he would resign with the wwe but, like most of his fellow ECW alumni he was used as jobber. He would be released in early 2003.
    Raven debuted in TNA Wrestling on January 22, 2003, two days after his release from WWE, attacking and hitting his finisher on Jeff Jarrett and stealing the NWA World Heavyweight Title from him. Raven then embarked upon a long-running storyline in which he claimed it was his "destiny" to win the NWA World Heavyweight Title. Raven began playing mind games with the roster, starting with his former nemesis Sandman, and debuted his trademark Clockwork Orange House of Fun match, which Levy devised himself. On April 30, 2003 Raven got his first shot at Jarrett's NWA World Heavyweight title, yet Jarrett won the match. Raven worked one last match for the promotion on November 12, 2010, defeating TNA Television Champion A.J. Styles in a non–title match at the Farewell at the Asylum live event.
    He is still active on the indy circuit



    http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2ijqt_raven-crucifies-sandman_shortfilms
  • genocidecutter
    genocidecutter Members Posts: 17,825 ✭✭✭✭✭
    8.Triple H
    triple-h.jpg
    Although he had a great face run with D-Generation X He always a much better heel. On Triple H dubbed himself "The Game," implying that he was on top of the wrestling world and was nicknamed "The Cerebral Assassin" by Jim Ross. On the January 3 episode of Raw is War, Triple H defeated The Big Show to win his third WWF championship.
    Triple H feuded with 🤬 Foley in early 2000. They both fought at the Royal Rumble in a Street Fight Match for the WWF Championship, which Triple won after doing two pedigrees on Foley. The storyline would come to an end at No Way Out in a Hell in a Cell where if 🤬 Foley lost he would have to retire. Triple H retained his title at the PPV and thus ending 🤬 Foley's fifteen year career. During the May 21, 2001 episode of Raw, he suffered a legitimate and career-threatening injury.
    He would return as face on January 7, 2002 at Madison Square Garden. He won the Royal Rumble and received an Undisputed WWF Championship match at WrestleMania X8. At WrestleMania X8, Triple H beat Chris Jericho for the Undisputed Championship. After holding the title for a month, Helmsley dropped it to Hulk Hogan at Backlash. Meanwhile, Shawn Michaels had made his return to WWE and joined the New World Order (nWo). Michaels and Kevin Nash planned to bring Triple H over to Raw in order to put him into the group. Vince McMahon, however, disbanded the nWo following several backstage complications and brought in Eric Bischoff as the Raw brand's new general manager. One of Bischoff's first intentions was to follow up on the nWo's plan and bring Triple H over to the Raw roster. Triple H did indeed go to the Raw brand, reuniting with Shawn Michaels, but on July 22 he turned on Michaels by performing a Pedigree on him during what was supposed to be a DX reunion, turning heel once again. The following week, Triple H smashed Michaels' face into a car window to prove that Michaels was weak. These events led to the beginning of a long storyline rivalry between the former partners and an eventual "Unsanctioned Street Fight" at SummerSlam, in which Michaels came out of retirement to win. Afterwards, however, Triple H attacked him with a sledgehammer, and Michaels was carried out of the ring.
    In January 2003, Triple H formed a stable known as Evolution with Ric Flair, Randy Orton, and Batista. Though he would bury many talent on the Raw roster such as RVD and Booker he was still a damn good heel. Triple H and Ric Flair challenged RVD and Kane for the World Tag Team Titles, but they lost the match. The group was pushed on Raw from 2003 to 2004. The height of their dominance occurred after Armageddon when every member of Evolution left the pay-per-view holding a title. Triple H held the World Heavyweight Championship for most of 2003 until Unforgiven, losing the title to Bill Goldberg. After a failed attempt to win back the title from Goldberg in a rematch at the Survivor Series, he finally regained the championship against Goldberg in a triple threat match at Armageddon which also involved Kane. At the 2004 Royal Rumble, Triple H and Shawn Michaels fought in a Last Man Standing match to a double countout, so Triple H retained the title as a result.[56] Triple H dropped the title to Chris Benoit at WrestleMania 🤬 , and he was unable to reclaim the belt from Benoit in subsequent rematches, including a rematch from WrestleMania between Triple H, Benoit, and Shawn Michaels at Backlash.
    He then ended his feud with Michaels, defeating him in a Hell in a Cell match at Bad Blood. After another failed attempt, losing to Benoit at Vengeance, he focused on Eugene, beating him at SummerSlam. Triple H then regained the title from former associate Randy Orton at Unforgiven. Following a Triple Threat World Heavyweight title defense against Benoit and Edge on the November 29, 2004 episode of Raw, the World Heavyweight Championship became vacant for the first time.At New Year's Revolution, Triple H won the Elimination Chamber to begin his tenth world title reign. At WrestleMania 21, Triple H lost the championship to Batista, and subsequently lost two rematches at Backlash and Vengeance. After Vengeance, Triple H took hiatus from WWE due to suffering from his minor neck problems.
    After four month hiatus, Triple H returned to Raw on October 3, 2005 as part of WWE Homecoming. He teamed with fellow Evolution member Flair to defeat Chris Masters and Carlito. After the match, Triple H turned on Flair hitting Flair with a sledgehammer, sparking a feud between the duo. Flair defeated Triple H in a Steel cage match at Taboo Tuesday for Flair's Intercontinental Championship. Subsequently, Triple H defeated Flair in a non-title Last Man Standing match at Survivor Series to end their feud. He would trun face in 2006 and has remained one every since.



  • genocidecutter
    genocidecutter Members Posts: 17,825 ✭✭✭✭✭
    7. Rick Rude
    rick_rude_display_image.jpg
    Born in St. Peter, Minnesota, Rude attended Robbinsdale High School in Robbinsdale, Minnesota with Tom Zenk, Brady Boone, Nikita Koloff, Curt Hennig, John Nord, Joseph Laurinaitis and Barry Darsow, all of whom later became professional wrestlers.
    Rude made his WWF debut in July 1987. Rude was managed by Jimmy Hart and later Bobby "The Brain" Heenan. He feuded with "Mr. Wonderful" Paul Orndorff, before starting one of his most famous feuds with Jake "The Snake" Roberts. Rude had a routine where, before the match, he would make a show of removing his robe while insulting the males in the crowd and, after his victories, he would kiss a woman that Heenan picked from the fans. One of Rude's trademarks was his specially airbrushed tights that he wore during matches. In one storyline, he tried to get Roberts' real-life wife, Cheryl, to comply, aggravating Roberts. On another occasion during the Roberts/Rude feud, Rude came to the ring with a picture of Cheryl stenciled on the front of his tights. A furious Roberts charged the ring and stripped Rude, appearing to television viewers to leave him naked, although the live audience saw him stripped to a g-string instead.
    Rude's next big feud was with The Ultimate Warrior and began in January at the 1989 Royal Rumble pay-per-view in a "Super Posedown" that ended with Rude attacking Warrior with a metal pose bar. With help from Heenan, Rude won the Intercontinental Championship from the Warrior at WrestleMania V, before dropping it back to the Warrior at SummerSlam 1989, due in large part to interference from "Rowdy" Roddy Piper. Rude then feuded with Piper, before resuming his conflict with the Warrior in the summer of 1990 after the Warrior had won the WWF Championship. The two battled in a cage at SummerSlam 1990; however, Rude failed to win the title and departed from WWF in October 1990. This departure came right before he was scheduled to feud with the Big Boss Man, which had its potential start when Rude started to make degrading comments about The Boss Man's mother.
    After spending a year wrestling in select shows in the independent circuit, Rude returned to World Championship Wrestling, which had originally been Jim Crockett Promotions prior to being sold to Ted Turner in late 1988; he returned under a mask as The Halloween Phantom at Halloween Havoc on October 27, 1991, unmasking himself later that night. He led The Dangerous Alliance, consisting of himself, Paul E. Dangerously, Madusa, Arn Anderson, Bobby Eaton, Larry Zbyszko, and "Stunning" Steve Austin. On November 19, 1991, Rude defeated Sting for the WCW United States Heavyweight Championship and engaged in a number of high profile feudes, including one with Ricky Steamboat. At one point during their feud, Steamboat suffered a kayfabe broken nose in a gang attack. After dropping the title to Sting on April 17, Rude pinned Sting on May 1 in Fukuoka to become a three time champion. Rude, however, injured his back during the match when, upon receiving a suicide dive at ringside, he landed on the corner of the raised platform surrounding the ring; unable to wrestle, he was stripped of the title (with the storyline excuse that he was found to have used the title belt as a weapon in the course of the match). Rude retired shortly thereafter.
    Rude later returned to WWF as the "insurance policy" of the D-Generation X (DX) stable (Shawn Michaels, Triple H, and Chyna). As a member of DX, Rude never wrestled, but would stay ringside during the group's matches. He once again left WWF after the Montreal Screwjob at Survivor Series. He passed away in 1999 at age 40




  • Idiopathic Joker
    Idiopathic Joker PISTOL GRIP PUMP IN MY LAP AT ALL TIMES Working On My LowriderMembers, Moderators Posts: 45,690 Regulator
    Rick Rude and Ted Dibiase should be 1 and 2
  • genocidecutter
    genocidecutter Members Posts: 17,825 ✭✭✭✭✭
    6.Ted Dibiase
    The+Million+Dollar+Man+Ted+DiBiase+Ted.jpg
    In 1997 he would resign with the wwf after wrestling for the company briefly in 1979 as the Million dollar man. The Million Dollar Man character was based on the type of wrestler that Vince McMahon would want to be. DiBiase had a bodyguard by the name of Virgil, that was also by his side during matches, and all of his vignettes. The idea for the name Virgil was based on then-NWA booker Dusty Rhodes, whose real name is Virgil Runnels. The name of DiBiase's finishing move, the Million Dollar Dream (in which someone is put to sleep), was also meant to be an insult to Dusty Rhodes, who was named the American Dream.
    Virgil was often seen performing humiliating tasks, such as rubbing DiBiase's feet. DiBiase claimed "Everybody has a price" demonstrating his "power" through a series of vignettes in which he did things such as bribe the manager of a local swimming pool to close for the day so he could have the pool to himself, or when the honeymoon suite in a hotel was already booked, he bribed the desk clerk to have the couple already in there thrown out. Other skits featured DiBiase traveling in limousines, giving $100 tips to waiters, and using $100 bills in convenience stores for small purchases like chewing gum. In reality, DiBiase's road travel was deliberately booked for first-class airplane flights and five-star hotel accommodations, and he was given a stipend of petty cash from the WWF Offices so that he could "throw money around" in public (i.e. pick up tabs and "overtip", buy drinks for entire bars, actually pay for small items with a $100 bill, etc.) in order to make the character seem more real. Other times, DiBiase invited fans (including a young Rob Van Dam) to perform humiliating acts (such as kissing his feet) for money. During one skit, he invited a young boy onto a stage and told him if he bounced a ball 15 times in succession, DiBiase would pay him $500. After the 14th bounce, DiBiase kicked the ball away, sending the boy home without pay. (Though, according to his autobiography, everybody who wasn't paid on-camera was paid off-camera.) He frequently stuffed a $100 bill into the mouth of a wrestler on whom he had used the Million Dollar Dream move.
    His first big in-ring angle came in late 1987 on an episode of Superstars of Wrestling, where he announced his plan to buy the WWF Championship from Hulk Hogan. Hogan refused and said that DiBiase would have to defeat him in the ring for the belt. Hogan got the upper hand in a series of matches, and a frustrated DiBiase approached André the Giant to win the belt for him. On the February 5, 1988 edition of The Main Event (which aired live on NBC), André defeated Hogan under questionable circumstances for the WWF Championship. Referee Dave Hebner was detained backstage and replaced with a referee DiBiase paid to have plastic surgery (actually Dave's twin brother Earl). He counted the pin for André despite the fact that Hogan's shoulder was up at the count of one; André then announced he was surrendering the belt and handed it to DiBiase. DiBiase was in fact billed as WWF champion in three house shows, the following days, defending the belt one time against Bam Bam Bigelow. However, successively WWF refused to acknowledge DiBiase as the champion (since titles could not be handed to someone else) and declared the title vacant (as the title could not be given back to Hogan due to the match being official, and Andre's handing off the belt to DiBiase was considered a surrender of the title.). André's world title win was always recognized though, and is still considered the shortest world title reign in WWF history (Until Yokozuna's first reign at Wrestlemania 9, when he won the title from Bret Hart only to challenge and lose the title to Hulk Hogan moments later). This angle was an amplification of an angle in the old Georgia Championship Wrestling, when Larry Zbyszko paid Killer Tim Brooks $25,000 for his NWA National Heavyweight Championship in 1983.
    Ted DiBiase officially formed the tag team, Money Incorporated, with Irwin R. Schyster (IRS). The duo, mostly managed by Jimmy Hart, won the WWF Tag Team Championship three times between February 1992 and June 1993. Their first reign came on February 7, 1992 when they defeated The Legion of Doom for the titles. Money Incorporated then feuded with The Natural Disasters (Earthquake and Typhoon). They defended the title against the Natural Disasters at WrestleMania VIII and lost the match by countout, thus retaining the title. On July 20, they lost the title to the Natural Disasters. After a few months in Japan, he quietly announced his retirement due to accumulated injuries and returned to the USA.



  • genocidecutter
    genocidecutter Members Posts: 17,825 ✭✭✭✭✭
    5. Un-Americans
    sheik-volkoff.jpg
    It was at this point that Volkoff really pushed the envelope and began to sing the national anthem of the Soviet Union before every match, in order to gain even more heat for being a foreign heel. The new team of Volkoff and The Iron Sheik captured the coveted WWF Tag Team Championship from The U.S. Express (Mike Rotundo and Barry Windham) at WrestleMania, on March 31, 1985. After losing the titles back to Rotundo and Windham three months later, Volkoff began to wrestle more in singles competition, picking up a notable feud with Corporal Kirchner. They faced off in a flag match at WrestleMania 2, which Kirschner won. Volkoff also wrestled Hulk Hogan for the WWF World Heavyweight Championship on several occasions in 1985 and 1986, but did not win.
    In the fall of 1986, Volkoff's manager Classy Freddy Blassie sold half interest in his stable of superstars to the “Doctor of Style,” Slick (kayfabe). Giving Slick co-managerial rights to Nikolai Volkoff, Classy Freddy Blassie also shared the contracts of the Iron Sheik and Hercules. Blassie eventually retired in the fall of 1986. Sheik and Volkoff feuded with WWF newcomer Jim Duggan for the majority of 1987.
    In late 1987, Volkoff was teamed with Boris Zukhov, another alleged Russian (actually an American), to form The Bolsheviks. However, this tag team combination for Volkoff did not gain the success as did his partnership with The Iron Sheik. As they lost the public eye due to many losses, they eventually lost their manager Slick. The Bolsheviks never held any titles together, and are perhaps best remembered for being defeated in 19 seconds by The Hart Foundation at WrestleMania VI. Eventually, by 1990, The Bolsheviks split up. Volkoff publicly ended the partnership prior to a match where he confronted Zukhov and then started singing "The Star-Spangled Banner", drawing loud cheers from the audience and turning face in the process.
    A short time after The Bolsheviks split, Volkoff became a fan favorite for the first time in his career. His gimmick was now that of a recently liberated Lithuanian, following the fall of the Soviet Union; he became very pro-west which led to a feud with Sgt. Slaughter who was involved in an Iraqi sympathizer role and teamed with the Iron Sheik, who had recently began an Iraqi gimmick as opposed to his actual Iranian heritage. After Volkoff's team defeated Slaughter's team at the 1990 Survivor Series (Tito Santana being the sole survivor), Volkoff left the WWF at the end of 1990. He would make a brief return to compete in the 1992 Royal Rumble match.
    In 1994, Volkoff again returned to the WWF and became a sympathetic heel by playing the whipping-boy of Ted DiBiase's Million Dollar Corporation. Volkoff had kayfabe fallen on hard times and was forced to take a job working for DiBiase and his new Corporation. As low man in the group he was forced to wrestle matches no one else wanted to or sent out to "soften up" opponents for other members of the stable as the sacrificial lamb of the group. The disrespect even extended to renaming him "Nickel & Dime" Volkoff and DiBiase forcing him to place a ¢ on his trunks where the Russian sickle once was along with a sign on his ring attire that read "Property Of The Million Dollar Man". Following this last run in the WWF, Volkoff entered a semi-retirement.




    BTW make sure you guys check out Iron Sheik's shoot vid. Funny stuff
  • genocidecutter
    genocidecutter Members Posts: 17,825 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Top 4 comming soon
  • genocidecutter
    genocidecutter Members Posts: 17,825 ✭✭✭✭✭
    4. Iraq Sgt Slaughter
    sergeant-slaughter.jpg
    During summer 1990, Slaughter returned to the WWF, but shortly after making his televised return, Slaughter's gimmick as that of a patriotic American soldier was turned upside down, when his character temporarily turned against America to become an Iraqi sympathizer. Slaughter announced he was disgusted with his country, claiming America had "gone soft" for accepting the Soviet Union's Nikolai Volkoff, (Volkoff, in Slaughter's absence, had recently split from his tag partner Boris Zhukov, then turned face and embraced America, due in part to the fall of the wall). Slaughter aligned himself with a kayfabe Iraqi military general, General Adnan, and entered a feud with Volkoff (which saw Slaughter win the majority of their encounters at house shows), leading to a match at that year's Survivor Series which saw The Alliance (Volkoff, Tito Santana, and The Bushwhackers) defeat The Mercenaries (Slaughter, Boris Zhukov, and The Orient Express).
    It was reported that while Slaughter was portraying a turncoat, he had received numerous death threats and could not go anywhere in public without wearing a bullet-proof vest and had to be surrounded with security personnel at all times.
    Slaughter captured his only WWF Championship at the 1991 Royal Rumble, defeating The Ultimate Warrior following a run-in by "Macho King" Randy Savage. He thus became the thirteenth WWF Champion, but lost the belt in a match against Hulk Hogan at WrestleMania VII. Slaughter soon introduced his newest ally, Colonel Mustafa (The Iron Sheik, Slaughter's old nemesis). Slaughter and company went on to feud with Hogan for months, including having a three-on-two handicap match at SummerSlam 1991, which saw the team of Hulk Hogan and the Ultimate Warrior prevail over Slaughter, Adnan, and Mustafa.
    After finishing the Hogan feud, Slaughter became a face again, appearing in vignettes next to American landmarks, saying "I want my country back."


  • genocidecutter
    genocidecutter Members Posts: 17,825 ✭✭✭✭✭
    3. The Four Horseman
    four%20horsemen.jpg
    The Four Horsemen formed in January 1986 with Ric Flair, with Flair's storyline cousins Arn Anderson and Ole Anderson, and Tully Blanchard, with James J. Dillon as their manager. They feuded with Dusty Rhodes (breaking his ankle and hand), Magnum TA, Barry Windham, The Rock 'n' Roll Express (breaking Ricky Morton's nose), Nikita Koloff (injuring his neck), and The Road Warriors. Dusty Rhodes, Animal, Hawk, Ronnie Garvin and many others fought Ric Flair for the NWA World Heavyweight Title during that time period. They usually had most of the titles in the NWA, and they often bragged about their success (in the ring and with women) in their interviews.
    The Four Horsemen moniker was not planned from the start. Due to time constraints at a television taping, production threw together an impromptu tag team interview of Flair, the Andersons, Tully Blanchard and Dillon; all were now united after Ole Anderson returned and, along with Flair and Arn, tried to break Dusty's leg during a wrestling event at the Omni in Atlanta during the fall of 1985. It was during this interview that Arn said something to the effect of "The only time this much havoc had been wreaked by this few a number of people, you need to go all the way back to the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse!" The comparison and the name stuck. Nevertheless, Arn has said in an RF Video shoot interview that he, Flair and Blanchard were as close as anybody could be away from the ring while they were together. They lived the gimmick outside of the arena, as they took limos and jets to the cities in which they wrestled. Baby Doll was Flair's valet for a couple of months in 1986, after previously managing Tully Blanchard during 1985.
    In September 1988, Arn Anderson and Tully Blanchard left to join the World Wrestling Federation (WWF), dropping the tag titles at the very last minute to the Midnight Express (Stan Lane and Bobby Eaton). Anderson and Blanchard were known as "The Brain Busters" in the WWF, and they were managed by Bobby "the Brain" Heenan.
    Flair, Windham, and Dillon continued to refer to themselves as "the Horsemen" and the NWA even flirted with the idea of bringing in new members. Butch Reed was signed to wrestle solo matches with Dillon as his manager. Then in February 1989, Barry's brother Kendall Windham appeared to have joined them and even held up the four fingers after turning on Eddie Gilbert during a tag team match. Then Dillon left to take a front office job with the WWF, and they dropped the Horsemen name, hiring Hiro Matsuda as their new manager and changing their name to Yamazaki Corporation. Their major feuds were with Lex Luger, Eddie Gilbert, Ricky Steamboat and Sting and they did everything they could to get rid of these opponents. After losing the U. S. title to Luger, Barry Windham left the group due to an injury (a broken hand which occurred in his match against Luger at Chi-Town Rumble and required surgery; this enabled him to leave the promotion and show up in the WWF as "The Widowmaker") and Kendall was not used as much more than a jobber and the group seemed like a shell of the unit it looked like on paper when it formed. They added Michael Hayes after Barry's injury and he feuded with Luger but the group disbanded when Hayes reformed The Fabulous Freebirds in May and Matsuda left the promotion.
    The Horsemen concept helped define the NWA in the mid to late 1980s. The departure of Anderson and Blanchard was huge at the time, Dillon and Windham's departure made it worse, and despite numerous revivals over the coming decade, things were never quite the same.



  • Already Home_17
    Already Home_17 Members Posts: 14,572 ✭✭✭✭✭
    besides hhh's antics as a heel, i believe j.r. commentating most of these antics got hhh over more than anything
    j.r. could sell spilled milk as if it was a natural disaster
  • dalyricalbandit
    dalyricalbandit Co-Owner Of AllhipHop.com, Super Moderator, Administrator, Moderator Members, Moderators Posts: 67,918 Regulator
    hopefully u dont have Edge as top 2


    Edge is overrated to much!
  • Copper
    Copper The WickMembers Posts: 49,532 ✭✭✭✭✭
    hollywood hogan with the spraypainted belt and the voodochild theme..will always be in my top 5
  • dalyricalbandit
    dalyricalbandit Co-Owner Of AllhipHop.com, Super Moderator, Administrator, Moderator Members, Moderators Posts: 67,918 Regulator
    Alot of the names mention could be top 5....loke Copperkid said hollywood hogan was epic just the fact that hogan was a babyface almost 20yrs was incredible, Vince also
  • Already Home_17
    Already Home_17 Members Posts: 14,572 ✭✭✭✭✭
    hopefully u dont have Edge as top 2


    Edge is overrated to much!

    lyrical you one of most respectable posters on this site
    cant c/s you on that tho my 🤬 lol not saying edge should be in the top 2 but dude is definitely one of the best heels in the last decade
  • dalyricalbandit
    dalyricalbandit Co-Owner Of AllhipHop.com, Super Moderator, Administrator, Moderator Members, Moderators Posts: 67,918 Regulator
    hopefully u dont have Edge as top 2


    Edge is overrated to much!

    lyrical you one of most respectable posters on this site
    cant c/s you on that tho my 🤬 lol not saying edge should be in the top 2 but dude is definitely one of the best heels in the last decade

    i respect ur opinion, but all im saying is i feel like folks overrate Edge. like he was cool and all but lets not act like son wasnt a b or even c lister when all the big players (Austin,Rock,Taker,Hbk,HHH,Kane etc) were running the Attitude era. son got big the last few yrs when 🤬 got watered down i personally dont think he could hang with afew of the names mention in Cutters list but again thats just me
  • Already Home_17
    Already Home_17 Members Posts: 14,572 ✭✭✭✭✭
    hopefully u dont have Edge as top 2


    Edge is overrated to much!

    lyrical you one of most respectable posters on this site
    cant c/s you on that tho my 🤬 lol not saying edge should be in the top 2 but dude is definitely one of the best heels in the last decade

    i respect ur opinion, but all im saying is i feel like folks overrate Edge. like he was cool and all but lets not act like son wasnt a b or even c lister when all the big players (Austin,Rock,Taker,Hbk,HHH,Kane etc) were running the Attitude era. son got big the last few yrs when 🤬 got watered down i personally dont think he could hang with afew of the names mention in Cutters list but again thats just me

    dude had sex on live tv. i wouldnt call that watered down lol

    when the big players were main eventing in the AE, edge & christian were damn near running the tag team division when it was arguably as its best. the matches they put together with the hardys and dudleys were amazing, and even though the hardy boys and dudley boys were more popular, edge and christian would always get the upper hand on them. look at the triangular ladder match at WM16, TLC and TLC 2 matches. edge and christian won those
    plus they were great at drawing heat from the crowd, finding ways to straight ether the city they were performing in

    im guessing you never paid attention to the edge-taker feud in 07-08.they had great chemistry together and edge kept up with taker in the ring with every step of the way. they main evented WM28 and edge was countering damn near all of takers signature moves. he cashed in his mitb briefcase on taker after his steel cage match with batista. he cost taker the world title in hiac against batista. he beat taker in TLC match and "ended" his career. like i said, dude always found a way to get the upper hand on his opponents and that made people hate him

    you can say he got big in the watered down era but edge was making noise as a heel before the PG era even started. plus he put on great matches with everybody. taker, hbk, hhh, benoit, gurerro, angle, cena, orton, foley, flair, batista, jeff hardy, rvd, jericho, mysterio, regal, etc.

    edge was no joke
  • Peezy_Jenkins
    Peezy_Jenkins Sion Guests, Members, Writer, Content Producer Posts: 33,205 ✭✭✭✭✭
    hopefully u dont have Edge as top 2


    Edge is overrated to much!

    lyrical you one of most respectable posters on this site
    cant c/s you on that tho my 🤬 lol not saying edge should be in the top 2 but dude is definitely one of the best heels in the last decade

    i respect ur opinion, but all im saying is i feel like folks overrate Edge. like he was cool and all but lets not act like son wasnt a b or even c lister when all the big players (Austin,Rock,Taker,Hbk,HHH,Kane etc) were running the Attitude era. son got big the last few yrs when 🤬 got watered down i personally dont think he could hang with afew of the names mention in Cutters list but again thats just me

    i see where ur coming from, i see edge as a legendary great in-ring wrestler, but at the same time was never quite on the level of anyone u mentioned in terms of being as big as star(except maybe kane)
  • Peezy_Jenkins
    Peezy_Jenkins Sion Guests, Members, Writer, Content Producer Posts: 33,205 ✭✭✭✭✭
    genocide, if raven made ur top 10, where would u rank the dudley boyz(specifically ecw), top 10, 20, 30? just curious
  • genocidecutter
    genocidecutter Members Posts: 17,825 ✭✭✭✭✭
    2. Mr. Mcmahon
    mmmm.jpg
    He had the biggest feud of the attitude era with Stone Cold. In December 1997 on Raw is War, the night after D-Generation X: In Your House, McMahon talked about the behavior and attitude of Stone Cold Steve Austin, such as Austin having assaulted WWF Official Commissioner Slaughter, and how he has attacked WWF announcers such as Jim Ross and McMahon himself. Mr. McMahon demanded that Austin defend his Intercontinental championship against The Rock in a rematch. As in the previous match, Stone Cold used his pickup truck as a weapon against The Rock and the Nation of 🤬 gang. Austin decided to forfeit the title to The Rock but, instead, Austin gave The Rock a Stone Cold Stunner and knocked McMahon off the ring ropes.
    On the March 30 episode of Raw is War, the night after Austin won the WWF Title at WrestleMania XIV, McMahon presented him with a new title belt and warned Austin that he did not approve of his rebellious nature. In April 1998, it appeared Austin and McMahon were going to battle out their differences in an actual match, but the match was declared a no contest when Dude Love made an appearance; off-screen, this marked the first time since June 10, 1996 that Raw beat WCW Monday Nitro in the ratings. This led to a match between Love and Austin at Unforgiven, where Mr. McMahon would sit at ringside during the title match. Dude Love won the match by disqualification when Austin hit McMahon with a chair. In a rematch at In Your House: Over The Edge for the WWF Championship, Austin managed to retain the title despite McMahon acting as the referee and his "Corporate Stooges" (Gerald Brisco and Pat Patterson) as timekeeper and ring announcer, respectively.
    McMahon restarted a long-running feud with Stone Cold Steve Austin when, in December 1998, he made Austin face the Undertaker in a Buried Alive match with the Royal Rumble qualification on the line. Austin defeated the Undertaker with help from Kane. McMahon had put up $100,000 to anyone who could eliminate Austin from the Royal Rumble match. At Royal Rumble, thanks to help from the Corporation's attack on Austin in the women's bathroom during the match (Austin and McMahon went under the ropes, not over them as the Royal Rumble rules require for an elimination to occur along with the 'Shawn Michaels Rule', in which both feet must touch the floor after going over the top rope) and the Rock distracting Austin, McMahon lifted Austin over the top rope from behind, thus winning the match and earning a title shot at WrestleMania XV against the WWF Champion The Rock. He turned down his spot, however, and WWF Commissioner Shawn Michaels awarded it to Austin, which infuriated McMahon. Austin decided to put his title shot on the line against McMahon so he could get a chance to fight Vince at In Your House: St. Valentine's Day Massacre in a steel cage match. During the match, Big Show—a future member of the Corporation—interrupted, making his WWF debut. He threw Austin through the side of the cage thus giving him the victory.
    The Corporation started a feud with The Undertaker's new faction the "Ministry of Darkness," which led to a storyline introducing McMahon's daughter Stephanie. Stephanie played an "innocent sweet girl" who was kidnapped by The Ministry twice. The first time she was kidnapped, she was found by Ken Shamrock on behalf of McMahon in a basement of the stadium. The second time she was kidnapped, The Undertaker attempted to marry her whilst she was forcefully tied to the Ministry's crucifix, but she was saved by Stone Cold Steve Austin. This angle saw a brief friendship develop between McMahon and Austin, cooling their long running feud. A previously unknown character was developed as a result called the "Higher Power", invented by Shane McMahon and The Undertaker. McMahon, however, was later revealed as the "Higher Power" on the June 7 episode of Raw, reigniting his feud with WWF Champion Austin. McMahon's son Shane merged the Corporation with Undertaker's Ministry of Darkness to form the Corporate Ministry. McMahon would become a member of the stable The Union which existed for a brief time, during May 1999. As a result of McMahon being the "Higher Power", Austin was given 50% shares of the WWF by Linda and Stephanie McMahon out of their kayfabe disgust at him.
    At King of the Ring, Vince and Shane defeated Austin in a handicap ladder match to regain control of the WWF. While CEO, Austin had scheduled a WWF Title match, to be shown on Raw after King Of The Ring. During the match, Austin defeated the Undertaker once again to become the WWF Champion. At Fully Loaded, Austin was again scheduled for a match against The Undertaker. If Austin lost, he would be banned from wrestling for the WWF Championship again; if he won, Vince McMahon would be banned from appearing on WWF TV. Austin defeated The Undertaker, and McMahon was banned from WWF TV.



  • genocidecutter
    genocidecutter Members Posts: 17,825 ✭✭✭✭✭
    1.NWO
    nwo.jpg
    Really was there any other choice?



  • Crude_
    Crude_ Legend Members Posts: 19,965 ✭✭✭✭✭
    No Jake the Snake Roberts or Hollywood Hogan.

    The NWO counts but Hogans heel turn was probably the biggest thing that happened in wrestling in years at that point.

    People also forget that the Heartbreak Kid Shawn Michaels started out as a heel for a good while.

    Steve Austin was probably the best heel of all time he was originally a heel but when Vince saw the fans liked the gimmick he turned him face.