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Scarface Says Hip Hop Is Intentionally Being Dumbed Down

135

Comments

  • SnuffDaddy
    SnuffDaddy Members Posts: 1,449 ✭✭✭✭✭
    GunTown wrote: »
    Not sure about that but i do feel hip hop made a transition into accepting more and more suburban raised rappers though that shouldn't matter if there is talnt, Wiz Khalifa is that but he real dope

    I think u missed it. Im sure he has no problem with suburban raised rappers but i think he was saying suburban as in white, to be diplomatic as he said. His whole point was synanamous with the Elvis & Rock saga.
  • DOPEdweebz
    DOPEdweebz What title? www.facebook.com/DOPEdweebzMembers, Moderators, Writer Posts: 29,364 Regulator
    Only read the title. I thought this was known.

  • MarcusGarvey
    MarcusGarvey Members Posts: 4,569 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Excerpt from Slate article

    It’s a huge pendulum swing in less than a decade: In 2004, literally every song that topped the Hot 100 was by a person of color. This year, black artists had only featured roles. As Ann mentioned, Macklemore and Ryan Lewis were supported by Wanz on “Thrift Shop” and Ray Dalton on “Can’t Hold Us”; rapper T.I. and 2013 MVP Pharrell supported Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines”; and Barbadian pop queen Rihanna is supporting Eminem on our current No. 1, “The Monster.” We should place an asterisk next to half-Filipino, half–Puerto Rican Bruno Mars, who topped the big chart twice this year, with “Locked Out of Heaven” and “When I Was Your Man”—but neither one was an R&B/hip-hop radio hit. (While we’re discussing R&B appropriation and the monoculture, Bruno’s all-around best 2013 single—the Top Five hit “Treasure”—was a direct homage to the sound and even the look of “P.Y.T.”-era Michael Jackson.)

    That’s just the track record of African-Americans on the all-genre Hot 100; in a way, the R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart is even more surreal: It was topped by white acts 44 out of 52 weeks this year. In large part, that’s due to a controversial change Billboard made to the R&B/hip-hop chart at the end of 2012 that essentially makes it a condensed version of the Hot 100, rendering the chart near-useless to 🤬 fans of black music. The fact that Billboard, in essence, gave up on tracking the core R&B/hip-hop audience speaks volumes about the industry’s priorities in the digital era.

    So that leaves the question: Why? Why is there this drift away from black visibility in our music? Not to be too grand about it, but my honest opinion is that it’s of a piece with what Ta-Nehisi Coates would call the myth of a post-racial America. Music fans are playing out an unironic version of Stephen Colbert’s joke about not seeing color—we’re cool with the idea that authentic rhythmic music can now come from anyone, and yet somehow, when the data is compiled about what we’re all buying and streaming, the Timberlakes and Matherses and Macklemores keep winding up atop the stack, ahead of the Miguels and J. Coles.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/the_music_club/features/2013/music_club_2013/the_rock_hall_of_fame_and_the_billboard_hot_100_where_were_the_black_acts.html


    I dunno what to make of it. Hip Hop is being dumb down but I'm fearful history is repeating itself
  • trilladelic
    trilladelic Members Posts: 4,457 ✭✭✭✭✭
    this is old, right? doesnt make it any less true. just saying.
  • StillFaggyAF
    StillFaggyAF Queer LGBT CommunityMembers Posts: 40,358 ✭✭✭✭✭
    GunTown wrote: »
    Not sure about that but i do feel hip hop made a transition into accepting more and more suburban raised rappers though that shouldn't matter if there is talnt, Wiz Khalifa is that but he real dope

    suburban rappers been around since the beginning
  • Like Water
    Like Water Integrity 1st Members Posts: 5,265 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Lab Baby wrote: »
    Excerpt from Slate article

    It’s a huge pendulum swing in less than a decade: In 2004, literally every song that topped the Hot 100 was by a person of color. This year, black artists had only featured roles. As Ann mentioned, Macklemore and Ryan Lewis were supported by Wanz on “Thrift Shop” and Ray Dalton on “Can’t Hold Us”; rapper T.I. and 2013 MVP Pharrell supported Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines”; and Barbadian pop queen Rihanna is supporting Eminem on our current No. 1, “The Monster.” We should place an asterisk next to half-Filipino, half–Puerto Rican Bruno Mars, who topped the big chart twice this year, with “Locked Out of Heaven” and “When I Was Your Man”—but neither one was an R&B/hip-hop radio hit. (While we’re discussing R&B appropriation and the monoculture, Bruno’s all-around best 2013 single—the Top Five hit “Treasure”—was a direct homage to the sound and even the look of “P.Y.T.”-era Michael Jackson.)

    That’s just the track record of African-Americans on the all-genre Hot 100; in a way, the R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart is even more surreal: It was topped by white acts 44 out of 52 weeks this year. In large part, that’s due to a controversial change Billboard made to the R&B/hip-hop chart at the end of 2012 that essentially makes it a condensed version of the Hot 100, rendering the chart near-useless to 🤬 fans of black music. The fact that Billboard, in essence, gave up on tracking the core R&B/hip-hop audience speaks volumes about the industry’s priorities in the digital era.

    So that leaves the question: Why? Why is there this drift away from black visibility in our music? Not to be too grand about it, but my honest opinion is that it’s of a piece with what Ta-Nehisi Coates would call the myth of a post-racial America. Music fans are playing out an unironic version of Stephen Colbert’s joke about not seeing color—we’re cool with the idea that authentic rhythmic music can now come from anyone, and yet somehow, when the data is compiled about what we’re all buying and streaming, the Timberlakes and Matherses and Macklemores keep winding up atop the stack, ahead of the Miguels and J. Coles.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/the_music_club/features/2013/music_club_2013/the_rock_hall_of_fame_and_the_billboard_hot_100_where_were_the_black_acts.html


    I dunno what to make of it. Hip Hop is being dumb down but I'm fearful history is repeating itself

    I think people that think like this are thinking way too much into it. Not saying that I don't see a pattern, but it's not doomsday. I said this a few times on here, but Elvis isn't solely responsible for white people taking rock n roll. It was a slow decade and a half process, which culminated when Jimi Hendrix died. He was the greatest rock artist of that time, possibly ever. Imagine the moves he would've made if he was alive.

    As far as hip hop and Black people in music are concerned, we gotta get on our job. White people "taking over" isn't anything new. Celine Dion was shittin on the charts for like 10 years straight in a hip hop dominated world... and still didn't have 🤬 on Whitney Houston. Labels have particular plans for particular artists, and what you see is those plans coming to fruition. Phyllis Hyman could've been Whitney Houston, but she turned it down cuz she knew what time it was. She'd be too restricted from her own sound. Hip hop artists don't really plan 🤬 out like that, they just follow templates. They restrict themselves to club songs, girl songs, or street songs. That only gives you like a 4-5 year shelf life unless you decide to think outside the box.

    2004 looked like that cuz hip hop was dominant that year. But now hip hop is run by spineless 🤬 that would do anything for a check. It's not being taken over by white people, it's being taken over by greedy people who just happen to be mostly white. Puff is the true cancer of hip hop if there is one, and he already set the groundwork for the fuckery in 97, so his job is done. The question shouldn't be "how can Black people be dominant again?". we automatically lose if we think like that. We should be focusing on how to shift the power to the people's hands. We know more than the labels anyway.

    106 and Park and TRL was pretty much an exact replica of Billboard. If they didn't vote you on any of those shows, 🤬 your life and music. Now, even with Twitter and the internet, the labels don't know 🤬 cuz they're too busy 🤬 artists in the ass to actually sit down and talk to people. As much as cats on here say they don't wanna hear that rappity rap 🤬 ... there's a reason why Macklemore, K Dot, Jay, Drake and Em sell, but dudes like French, Future, Chief Keef and these dudes can be all over mainstream media and radio, and not be able to sell a million records combined. They 🤬 suck at rapping.

    Hip hop is coming back, it's just a matter of when and who's gonna be a part of it. Articles like this shows a lack of faith in some people. That mentality is gonna leave people shut out from infinite possibilities we already have. People don't understand that hip hop is moving in a different direction, away from mainstream influence. Joey Badass and them are platinum in the streets with barely a record deal. These dudes are being listened to, they're just not getting paid for their music or advertised by the media. If money and attention is what you want from this game, then yeah... be VERY afraid of white people taking over. But very soon there will be no representation of hip hop in the mainstream, and corporate America and those people writing these articles and predicting a doomsday will be talking to themselves while everyone else is partaking in something they no longer have control of. Hip hop lives in the underground, and from the lyricists to the party starters to the social commentators, it's doing great.

    This is one of the most well written things I've ever read on here. And also one of truest.

    Salute to you sir.
  • Ol' Fred
    Ol' Fred Members Posts: 886 ✭✭✭✭✭
    co-sizzle to mah 🤬 face!
  • rip.dilla
    rip.dilla ... push up the fader... bust the meter... shake the tweeter Members Posts: 17,412 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Scarface wrote: »
    Because the dumbest 🤬 I ever heard is on the radio right now..


    To paint the picture that I’m trying to paint to you guys is it seems like all our 🤬 is sounding really stupid and really, really dumb. Really, really corny ..



    True words but the way he said them is hilarious ..
  • Lustchyld
    Lustchyld Members Posts: 987 ✭✭✭✭
    Lab Baby wrote: »
    Excerpt from Slate article

    It’s a huge pendulum swing in less than a decade: In 2004, literally every song that topped the Hot 100 was by a person of color. This year, black artists had only featured roles. As Ann mentioned, Macklemore and Ryan Lewis were supported by Wanz on “Thrift Shop” and Ray Dalton on “Can’t Hold Us”; rapper T.I. and 2013 MVP Pharrell supported Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines”; and Barbadian pop queen Rihanna is supporting Eminem on our current No. 1, “The Monster.” We should place an asterisk next to half-Filipino, half–Puerto Rican Bruno Mars, who topped the big chart twice this year, with “Locked Out of Heaven” and “When I Was Your Man”—but neither one was an R&B/hip-hop radio hit. (While we’re discussing R&B appropriation and the monoculture, Bruno’s all-around best 2013 single—the Top Five hit “Treasure”—was a direct homage to the sound and even the look of “P.Y.T.”-era Michael Jackson.)

    That’s just the track record of African-Americans on the all-genre Hot 100; in a way, the R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart is even more surreal: It was topped by white acts 44 out of 52 weeks this year. In large part, that’s due to a controversial change Billboard made to the R&B/hip-hop chart at the end of 2012 that essentially makes it a condensed version of the Hot 100, rendering the chart near-useless to 🤬 fans of black music. The fact that Billboard, in essence, gave up on tracking the core R&B/hip-hop audience speaks volumes about the industry’s priorities in the digital era.

    So that leaves the question: Why? Why is there this drift away from black visibility in our music? Not to be too grand about it, but my honest opinion is that it’s of a piece with what Ta-Nehisi Coates would call the myth of a post-racial America. Music fans are playing out an unironic version of Stephen Colbert’s joke about not seeing color—we’re cool with the idea that authentic rhythmic music can now come from anyone, and yet somehow, when the data is compiled about what we’re all buying and streaming, the Timberlakes and Matherses and Macklemores keep winding up atop the stack, ahead of the Miguels and J. Coles.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/the_music_club/features/2013/music_club_2013/the_rock_hall_of_fame_and_the_billboard_hot_100_where_were_the_black_acts.html


    I dunno what to make of it. Hip Hop is being dumb down but I'm fearful history is repeating itself

    I think people that think like this are thinking way too much into it. Not saying that I don't see a pattern, but it's not doomsday. I said this a few times on here, but Elvis isn't solely responsible for white people taking rock n roll. It was a slow decade and a half process, which culminated when Jimi Hendrix died. He was the greatest rock artist of that time, possibly ever. Imagine the moves he would've made if he was alive.

    As far as hip hop and Black people in music are concerned, we gotta get on our job. White people "taking over" isn't anything new. Celine Dion was shittin on the charts for like 10 years straight in a hip hop dominated world... and still didn't have 🤬 on Whitney Houston. Labels have particular plans for particular artists, and what you see is those plans coming to fruition. Phyllis Hyman could've been Whitney Houston, but she turned it down cuz she knew what time it was. She'd be too restricted from her own sound. Hip hop artists don't really plan 🤬 out like that, they just follow templates. They restrict themselves to club songs, girl songs, or street songs. That only gives you like a 4-5 year shelf life unless you decide to think outside the box.

    2004 looked like that cuz hip hop was dominant that year. But now hip hop is run by spineless 🤬 that would do anything for a check. It's not being taken over by white people, it's being taken over by greedy people who just happen to be mostly white. Puff is the true cancer of hip hop if there is one, and he already set the groundwork for the fuckery in 97, so his job is done. The question shouldn't be "how can Black people be dominant again?". we automatically lose if we think like that. We should be focusing on how to shift the power to the people's hands. We know more than the labels anyway.

    106 and Park and TRL was pretty much an exact replica of Billboard. If they didn't vote you on any of those shows, 🤬 your life and music. Now, even with Twitter and the internet, the labels don't know 🤬 cuz they're too busy 🤬 artists in the ass to actually sit down and talk to people. As much as cats on here say they don't wanna hear that rappity rap 🤬 ... there's a reason why Macklemore, K Dot, Jay, Drake and Em sell, but dudes like French, Future, Chief Keef and these dudes can be all over mainstream media and radio, and not be able to sell a million records combined. They 🤬 suck at rapping.

    Hip hop is coming back, it's just a matter of when and who's gonna be a part of it. Articles like this shows a lack of faith in some people. That mentality is gonna leave people shut out from infinite possibilities we already have. People don't understand that hip hop is moving in a different direction, away from mainstream influence. Joey Badass and them are platinum in the streets with barely a record deal. These dudes are being listened to, they're just not getting paid for their music or advertised by the media. If money and attention is what you want from this game, then yeah... be VERY afraid of white people taking over. But very soon there will be no representation of hip hop in the mainstream, and corporate America and those people writing these articles and predicting a doomsday will be talking to themselves while everyone else is partaking in something they no longer have control of. Hip hop lives in the underground, and from the lyricists to the party starters to the social commentators, it's doing great.

    Great post
  • Disciplined InSight
    Disciplined InSight The Clairvoyant One.... Members Posts: 13,478 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The question we need to be assking: WHEN did the decline start and WHO is merely responsible for bringing in the 🤬 ? We all know the execs in power funded it but from an artist standpoint..WHO?

    1992
    Okay...go more in depth.
  • Meta_Conscious
    Meta_Conscious Hypocrite The BashmentMembers Posts: 26,227 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Lab Baby wrote: »
    Excerpt from Slate article

    It’s a huge pendulum swing in less than a decade: In 2004, literally every song that topped the Hot 100 was by a person of color. This year, black artists had only featured roles. As Ann mentioned, Macklemore and Ryan Lewis were supported by Wanz on “Thrift Shop” and Ray Dalton on “Can’t Hold Us”; rapper T.I. and 2013 MVP Pharrell supported Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines”; and Barbadian pop queen Rihanna is supporting Eminem on our current No. 1, “The Monster.” We should place an asterisk next to half-Filipino, half–Puerto Rican Bruno Mars, who topped the big chart twice this year, with “Locked Out of Heaven” and “When I Was Your Man”—but neither one was an R&B/hip-hop radio hit. (While we’re discussing R&B appropriation and the monoculture, Bruno’s all-around best 2013 single—the Top Five hit “Treasure”—was a direct homage to the sound and even the look of “P.Y.T.”-era Michael Jackson.)

    That’s just the track record of African-Americans on the all-genre Hot 100; in a way, the R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart is even more surreal: It was topped by white acts 44 out of 52 weeks this year. In large part, that’s due to a controversial change Billboard made to the R&B/hip-hop chart at the end of 2012 that essentially makes it a condensed version of the Hot 100, rendering the chart near-useless to 🤬 fans of black music. The fact that Billboard, in essence, gave up on tracking the core R&B/hip-hop audience speaks volumes about the industry’s priorities in the digital era.

    So that leaves the question: Why? Why is there this drift away from black visibility in our music? Not to be too grand about it, but my honest opinion is that it’s of a piece with what Ta-Nehisi Coates would call the myth of a post-racial America. Music fans are playing out an unironic version of Stephen Colbert’s joke about not seeing color—we’re cool with the idea that authentic rhythmic music can now come from anyone, and yet somehow, when the data is compiled about what we’re all buying and streaming, the Timberlakes and Matherses and Macklemores keep winding up atop the stack, ahead of the Miguels and J. Coles.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/the_music_club/features/2013/music_club_2013/the_rock_hall_of_fame_and_the_billboard_hot_100_where_were_the_black_acts.html


    I dunno what to make of it. Hip Hop is being dumb down but I'm fearful history is repeating itself

    I think people that think like this are thinking way too much into it. Not saying that I don't see a pattern, but it's not doomsday. I said this a few times on here, but Elvis isn't solely responsible for white people taking rock n roll. It was a slow decade and a half process, which culminated when Jimi Hendrix died. He was the greatest rock artist of that time, possibly ever. Imagine the moves he would've made if he was alive.

    As far as hip hop and Black people in music are concerned, we gotta get on our job. White people "taking over" isn't anything new. Celine Dion was shittin on the charts for like 10 years straight in a hip hop dominated world... and still didn't have 🤬 on Whitney Houston. Labels have particular plans for particular artists, and what you see is those plans coming to fruition. Phyllis Hyman could've been Whitney Houston, but she turned it down cuz she knew what time it was. She'd be too restricted from her own sound. Hip hop artists don't really plan 🤬 out like that, they just follow templates. They restrict themselves to club songs, girl songs, or street songs. That only gives you like a 4-5 year shelf life unless you decide to think outside the box.

    2004 looked like that cuz hip hop was dominant that year. But now hip hop is run by spineless 🤬 that would do anything for a check. It's not being taken over by white people, it's being taken over by greedy people who just happen to be mostly white. Puff is the true cancer of hip hop if there is one, and he already set the groundwork for the fuckery in 97, so his job is done. The question shouldn't be "how can Black people be dominant again?". we automatically lose if we think like that. We should be focusing on how to shift the power to the people's hands. We know more than the labels anyway.

    106 and Park and TRL was pretty much an exact replica of Billboard. If they didn't vote you on any of those shows, 🤬 your life and music. Now, even with Twitter and the internet, the labels don't know 🤬 cuz they're too busy 🤬 artists in the ass to actually sit down and talk to people. As much as cats on here say they don't wanna hear that rappity rap 🤬 ... there's a reason why Macklemore, K Dot, Jay, Drake and Em sell, but dudes like French, Future, Chief Keef and these dudes can be all over mainstream media and radio, and not be able to sell a million records combined. They 🤬 suck at rapping.

    Hip hop is coming back, it's just a matter of when and who's gonna be a part of it. Articles like this shows a lack of faith in some people. That mentality is gonna leave people shut out from infinite possibilities we already have. People don't understand that hip hop is moving in a different direction, away from mainstream influence. Joey Badass and them are platinum in the streets with barely a record deal. These dudes are being listened to, they're just not getting paid for their music or advertised by the media. If money and attention is what you want from this game, then yeah... be VERY afraid of white people taking over. But very soon there will be no representation of hip hop in the mainstream, and corporate America and those people writing these articles and predicting a doomsday will be talking to themselves while everyone else is partaking in something they no longer have control of. Hip hop lives in the underground, and from the lyricists to the party starters to the social commentators, it's doing great.

    Horseshit.
    How is hip hop falling off and completely out of the mainstream a good thing?
    It's a good thing for blacks to be relegated to chitlin circuits?
    It's ok for the money stream to dry up for blacks?
    No...
    This the soft mentality that has made the rock landscape white as 🤬 ... How we not profiting off some 🤬 we created?
    I don't know why u 🤬 think this is some profound post.
  • 1of1
    1of1 Members Posts: 37,468 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Stopitfive wrote: »
    Lab Baby wrote: »
    Excerpt from Slate article

    It’s a huge pendulum swing in less than a decade: In 2004, literally every song that topped the Hot 100 was by a person of color. This year, black artists had only featured roles. As Ann mentioned, Macklemore and Ryan Lewis were supported by Wanz on “Thrift Shop” and Ray Dalton on “Can’t Hold Us”; rapper T.I. and 2013 MVP Pharrell supported Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines”; and Barbadian pop queen Rihanna is supporting Eminem on our current No. 1, “The Monster.” We should place an asterisk next to half-Filipino, half–Puerto Rican Bruno Mars, who topped the big chart twice this year, with “Locked Out of Heaven” and “When I Was Your Man”—but neither one was an R&B/hip-hop radio hit. (While we’re discussing R&B appropriation and the monoculture, Bruno’s all-around best 2013 single—the Top Five hit “Treasure”—was a direct homage to the sound and even the look of “P.Y.T.”-era Michael Jackson.)

    That’s just the track record of African-Americans on the all-genre Hot 100; in a way, the R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart is even more surreal: It was topped by white acts 44 out of 52 weeks this year. In large part, that’s due to a controversial change Billboard made to the R&B/hip-hop chart at the end of 2012 that essentially makes it a condensed version of the Hot 100, rendering the chart near-useless to 🤬 fans of black music. The fact that Billboard, in essence, gave up on tracking the core R&B/hip-hop audience speaks volumes about the industry’s priorities in the digital era.

    So that leaves the question: Why? Why is there this drift away from black visibility in our music? Not to be too grand about it, but my honest opinion is that it’s of a piece with what Ta-Nehisi Coates would call the myth of a post-racial America. Music fans are playing out an unironic version of Stephen Colbert’s joke about not seeing color—we’re cool with the idea that authentic rhythmic music can now come from anyone, and yet somehow, when the data is compiled about what we’re all buying and streaming, the Timberlakes and Matherses and Macklemores keep winding up atop the stack, ahead of the Miguels and J. Coles.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/the_music_club/features/2013/music_club_2013/the_rock_hall_of_fame_and_the_billboard_hot_100_where_were_the_black_acts.html


    I dunno what to make of it. Hip Hop is being dumb down but I'm fearful history is repeating itself

    I think people that think like this are thinking way too much into it. Not saying that I don't see a pattern, but it's not doomsday. I said this a few times on here, but Elvis isn't solely responsible for white people taking rock n roll. It was a slow decade and a half process, which culminated when Jimi Hendrix died. He was the greatest rock artist of that time, possibly ever. Imagine the moves he would've made if he was alive.

    As far as hip hop and Black people in music are concerned, we gotta get on our job. White people "taking over" isn't anything new. Celine Dion was shittin on the charts for like 10 years straight in a hip hop dominated world... and still didn't have 🤬 on Whitney Houston. Labels have particular plans for particular artists, and what you see is those plans coming to fruition. Phyllis Hyman could've been Whitney Houston, but she turned it down cuz she knew what time it was. She'd be too restricted from her own sound. Hip hop artists don't really plan 🤬 out like that, they just follow templates. They restrict themselves to club songs, girl songs, or street songs. That only gives you like a 4-5 year shelf life unless you decide to think outside the box.

    2004 looked like that cuz hip hop was dominant that year. But now hip hop is run by spineless 🤬 that would do anything for a check. It's not being taken over by white people, it's being taken over by greedy people who just happen to be mostly white. Puff is the true cancer of hip hop if there is one, and he already set the groundwork for the fuckery in 97, so his job is done. The question shouldn't be "how can Black people be dominant again?". we automatically lose if we think like that. We should be focusing on how to shift the power to the people's hands. We know more than the labels anyway.

    106 and Park and TRL was pretty much an exact replica of Billboard. If they didn't vote you on any of those shows, 🤬 your life and music. Now, even with Twitter and the internet, the labels don't know 🤬 cuz they're too busy 🤬 artists in the ass to actually sit down and talk to people. As much as cats on here say they don't wanna hear that rappity rap 🤬 ... there's a reason why Macklemore, K Dot, Jay, Drake and Em sell, but dudes like French, Future, Chief Keef and these dudes can be all over mainstream media and radio, and not be able to sell a million records combined. They 🤬 suck at rapping.

    Hip hop is coming back, it's just a matter of when and who's gonna be a part of it. Articles like this shows a lack of faith in some people. That mentality is gonna leave people shut out from infinite possibilities we already have. People don't understand that hip hop is moving in a different direction, away from mainstream influence. Joey Badass and them are platinum in the streets with barely a record deal. These dudes are being listened to, they're just not getting paid for their music or advertised by the media. If money and attention is what you want from this game, then yeah... be VERY afraid of white people taking over. But very soon there will be no representation of hip hop in the mainstream, and corporate America and those people writing these articles and predicting a doomsday will be talking to themselves while everyone else is partaking in something they no longer have control of. Hip hop lives in the underground, and from the lyricists to the party starters to the social commentators, it's doing great.

    Horseshit.
    How is hip hop falling off and completely out of the mainstream a good thing?
    It's a good thing for blacks to be relegated to chitlin circuits?
    It's ok for the money stream to dry up for blacks?
    No...
    This the soft mentality that has made the rock landscape white as 🤬 ... How we not profiting off some 🤬 we created?
    I don't know why u 🤬 think this is some profound post.
  • S2J
    S2J Members Posts: 28,458 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2013
    Blame the South.

    Hip hop got too scared to step on toes and adress the elephant n the room: Southern music is remedial. (in general with some exceptions) Then that 🤬 snowballed...now there's nothin we can do about it.

    We dug ourselves a hole and instead of climbing out, we kept digging. East Coast artists and lyrical artists collab w/ these guys.
  • StoneColdMikey
    StoneColdMikey mikeyismod CHITOWN THE BEST TOWNMembers, Moderators Posts: 33,543 Regulator
    Last night on twitter he was giving some of these new rappers props tho
  • hnic1978
    hnic1978 Members Posts: 3,425 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I gotta question. Why is this news? Cuz Scarface said it. Don't get me wrong Scarface is in my top 5 for greatest rappers of all time, but this is not news. This is why i don't listen to the radio cuz its FLOODED with dumbed down music. The damn shame in all of this is there are people that are JUST catching on to this.
  • rip.dilla
    rip.dilla ... push up the fader... bust the meter... shake the tweeter Members Posts: 17,412 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Stopitfive wrote: »
    Lab Baby wrote: »
    Excerpt from Slate article

    It’s a huge pendulum swing in less than a decade: In 2004, literally every song that topped the Hot 100 was by a person of color. This year, black artists had only featured roles. As Ann mentioned, Macklemore and Ryan Lewis were supported by Wanz on “Thrift Shop” and Ray Dalton on “Can’t Hold Us”; rapper T.I. and 2013 MVP Pharrell supported Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines”; and Barbadian pop queen Rihanna is supporting Eminem on our current No. 1, “The Monster.” We should place an asterisk next to half-Filipino, half–Puerto Rican Bruno Mars, who topped the big chart twice this year, with “Locked Out of Heaven” and “When I Was Your Man”—but neither one was an R&B/hip-hop radio hit. (While we’re discussing R&B appropriation and the monoculture, Bruno’s all-around best 2013 single—the Top Five hit “Treasure”—was a direct homage to the sound and even the look of “P.Y.T.”-era Michael Jackson.)

    That’s just the track record of African-Americans on the all-genre Hot 100; in a way, the R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart is even more surreal: It was topped by white acts 44 out of 52 weeks this year. In large part, that’s due to a controversial change Billboard made to the R&B/hip-hop chart at the end of 2012 that essentially makes it a condensed version of the Hot 100, rendering the chart near-useless to 🤬 fans of black music. The fact that Billboard, in essence, gave up on tracking the core R&B/hip-hop audience speaks volumes about the industry’s priorities in the digital era.

    So that leaves the question: Why? Why is there this drift away from black visibility in our music? Not to be too grand about it, but my honest opinion is that it’s of a piece with what Ta-Nehisi Coates would call the myth of a post-racial America. Music fans are playing out an unironic version of Stephen Colbert’s joke about not seeing color—we’re cool with the idea that authentic rhythmic music can now come from anyone, and yet somehow, when the data is compiled about what we’re all buying and streaming, the Timberlakes and Matherses and Macklemores keep winding up atop the stack, ahead of the Miguels and J. Coles.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/the_music_club/features/2013/music_club_2013/the_rock_hall_of_fame_and_the_billboard_hot_100_where_were_the_black_acts.html


    I dunno what to make of it. Hip Hop is being dumb down but I'm fearful history is repeating itself

    I think people that think like this are thinking way too much into it. Not saying that I don't see a pattern, but it's not doomsday. I said this a few times on here, but Elvis isn't solely responsible for white people taking rock n roll. It was a slow decade and a half process, which culminated when Jimi Hendrix died. He was the greatest rock artist of that time, possibly ever. Imagine the moves he would've made if he was alive.

    As far as hip hop and Black people in music are concerned, we gotta get on our job. White people "taking over" isn't anything new. Celine Dion was shittin on the charts for like 10 years straight in a hip hop dominated world... and still didn't have 🤬 on Whitney Houston. Labels have particular plans for particular artists, and what you see is those plans coming to fruition. Phyllis Hyman could've been Whitney Houston, but she turned it down cuz she knew what time it was. She'd be too restricted from her own sound. Hip hop artists don't really plan 🤬 out like that, they just follow templates. They restrict themselves to club songs, girl songs, or street songs. That only gives you like a 4-5 year shelf life unless you decide to think outside the box.

    2004 looked like that cuz hip hop was dominant that year. But now hip hop is run by spineless 🤬 that would do anything for a check. It's not being taken over by white people, it's being taken over by greedy people who just happen to be mostly white. Puff is the true cancer of hip hop if there is one, and he already set the groundwork for the fuckery in 97, so his job is done. The question shouldn't be "how can Black people be dominant again?". we automatically lose if we think like that. We should be focusing on how to shift the power to the people's hands. We know more than the labels anyway.

    106 and Park and TRL was pretty much an exact replica of Billboard. If they didn't vote you on any of those shows, 🤬 your life and music. Now, even with Twitter and the internet, the labels don't know 🤬 cuz they're too busy 🤬 artists in the ass to actually sit down and talk to people. As much as cats on here say they don't wanna hear that rappity rap 🤬 ... there's a reason why Macklemore, K Dot, Jay, Drake and Em sell, but dudes like French, Future, Chief Keef and these dudes can be all over mainstream media and radio, and not be able to sell a million records combined. They 🤬 suck at rapping.

    Hip hop is coming back, it's just a matter of when and who's gonna be a part of it. Articles like this shows a lack of faith in some people. That mentality is gonna leave people shut out from infinite possibilities we already have. People don't understand that hip hop is moving in a different direction, away from mainstream influence. Joey Badass and them are platinum in the streets with barely a record deal. These dudes are being listened to, they're just not getting paid for their music or advertised by the media. If money and attention is what you want from this game, then yeah... be VERY afraid of white people taking over. But very soon there will be no representation of hip hop in the mainstream, and corporate America and those people writing these articles and predicting a doomsday will be talking to themselves while everyone else is partaking in something they no longer have control of. Hip hop lives in the underground, and from the lyricists to the party starters to the social commentators, it's doing great.

    Horseshit.
    How is hip hop falling off and completely out of the mainstream a good thing?
    It's a good thing for blacks to be relegated to chitlin circuits?
    It's ok for the money stream to dry up for blacks?
    No...
    This the soft mentality that has made the rock landscape white as 🤬 ... How we not profiting off some 🤬 we created?
    I don't know why u 🤬 think this is some profound post.


    I wish some certain HipHop acts with talent would get some shine in the mainstream kinda how Kendrick Lamar slowly evolved from an underground act to a superstar ..

    I do my bit and buy albums that normally wouldn't be discussed on here but it is what it is


  • StillFaggyAF
    StillFaggyAF Queer LGBT CommunityMembers Posts: 40,358 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The question we need to be assking: WHEN did the decline start and WHO is merely responsible for bringing in the 🤬 ? We all know the execs in power funded it but from an artist standpoint..WHO?

    1992
    Okay...go more in depth.

    The Chronic


    popularized the "gangsta" image for whites and was the beginning of the end
  • life_fulfilled
    life_fulfilled Members Posts: 25
    Music across the board has been dumbed down. Hip hop has suffered the most because of racial factors. People who think that it's not necessary for black people to have more infrastructure and control over our own image and a culture are utter fools. This "leave it to the underground" mentality, what does that even mean?

    The loss of black owned publications is a big factor.
  • ScottTrippin
    ScottTrippin Members Posts: 12
    Scarface is correct...HIPHOP sold its soul to the devil now the economics is more important than the message...We all are more interested in hearing a lifestyle that most of us don't live...HIPHOP has turned to Fiction and has lost what once made it great...I'm still a supporter but HIPHOP won't be the same until it attacks the evils that most bow down to and live by...
  • Like Water
    Like Water Integrity 1st Members Posts: 5,265 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Stopitfive wrote: »
    Lab Baby wrote: »
    Excerpt from Slate article

    It’s a huge pendulum swing in less than a decade: In 2004, literally every song that topped the Hot 100 was by a person of color. This year, black artists had only featured roles. As Ann mentioned, Macklemore and Ryan Lewis were supported by Wanz on “Thrift Shop” and Ray Dalton on “Can’t Hold Us”; rapper T.I. and 2013 MVP Pharrell supported Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines”; and Barbadian pop queen Rihanna is supporting Eminem on our current No. 1, “The Monster.” We should place an asterisk next to half-Filipino, half–Puerto Rican Bruno Mars, who topped the big chart twice this year, with “Locked Out of Heaven” and “When I Was Your Man”—but neither one was an R&B/hip-hop radio hit. (While we’re discussing R&B appropriation and the monoculture, Bruno’s all-around best 2013 single—the Top Five hit “Treasure”—was a direct homage to the sound and even the look of “P.Y.T.”-era Michael Jackson.)

    That’s just the track record of African-Americans on the all-genre Hot 100; in a way, the R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart is even more surreal: It was topped by white acts 44 out of 52 weeks this year. In large part, that’s due to a controversial change Billboard made to the R&B/hip-hop chart at the end of 2012 that essentially makes it a condensed version of the Hot 100, rendering the chart near-useless to 🤬 fans of black music. The fact that Billboard, in essence, gave up on tracking the core R&B/hip-hop audience speaks volumes about the industry’s priorities in the digital era.

    So that leaves the question: Why? Why is there this drift away from black visibility in our music? Not to be too grand about it, but my honest opinion is that it’s of a piece with what Ta-Nehisi Coates would call the myth of a post-racial America. Music fans are playing out an unironic version of Stephen Colbert’s joke about not seeing color—we’re cool with the idea that authentic rhythmic music can now come from anyone, and yet somehow, when the data is compiled about what we’re all buying and streaming, the Timberlakes and Matherses and Macklemores keep winding up atop the stack, ahead of the Miguels and J. Coles.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/the_music_club/features/2013/music_club_2013/the_rock_hall_of_fame_and_the_billboard_hot_100_where_were_the_black_acts.html


    I dunno what to make of it. Hip Hop is being dumb down but I'm fearful history is repeating itself

    I think people that think like this are thinking way too much into it. Not saying that I don't see a pattern, but it's not doomsday. I said this a few times on here, but Elvis isn't solely responsible for white people taking rock n roll. It was a slow decade and a half process, which culminated when Jimi Hendrix died. He was the greatest rock artist of that time, possibly ever. Imagine the moves he would've made if he was alive.

    As far as hip hop and Black people in music are concerned, we gotta get on our job. White people "taking over" isn't anything new. Celine Dion was shittin on the charts for like 10 years straight in a hip hop dominated world... and still didn't have 🤬 on Whitney Houston. Labels have particular plans for particular artists, and what you see is those plans coming to fruition. Phyllis Hyman could've been Whitney Houston, but she turned it down cuz she knew what time it was. She'd be too restricted from her own sound. Hip hop artists don't really plan 🤬 out like that, they just follow templates. They restrict themselves to club songs, girl songs, or street songs. That only gives you like a 4-5 year shelf life unless you decide to think outside the box.

    2004 looked like that cuz hip hop was dominant that year. But now hip hop is run by spineless 🤬 that would do anything for a check. It's not being taken over by white people, it's being taken over by greedy people who just happen to be mostly white. Puff is the true cancer of hip hop if there is one, and he already set the groundwork for the fuckery in 97, so his job is done. The question shouldn't be "how can Black people be dominant again?". we automatically lose if we think like that. We should be focusing on how to shift the power to the people's hands. We know more than the labels anyway.

    106 and Park and TRL was pretty much an exact replica of Billboard. If they didn't vote you on any of those shows, 🤬 your life and music. Now, even with Twitter and the internet, the labels don't know 🤬 cuz they're too busy 🤬 artists in the ass to actually sit down and talk to people. As much as cats on here say they don't wanna hear that rappity rap 🤬 ... there's a reason why Macklemore, K Dot, Jay, Drake and Em sell, but dudes like French, Future, Chief Keef and these dudes can be all over mainstream media and radio, and not be able to sell a million records combined. They 🤬 suck at rapping.

    Hip hop is coming back, it's just a matter of when and who's gonna be a part of it. Articles like this shows a lack of faith in some people. That mentality is gonna leave people shut out from infinite possibilities we already have. People don't understand that hip hop is moving in a different direction, away from mainstream influence. Joey Badass and them are platinum in the streets with barely a record deal. These dudes are being listened to, they're just not getting paid for their music or advertised by the media. If money and attention is what you want from this game, then yeah... be VERY afraid of white people taking over. But very soon there will be no representation of hip hop in the mainstream, and corporate America and those people writing these articles and predicting a doomsday will be talking to themselves while everyone else is partaking in something they no longer have control of. Hip hop lives in the underground, and from the lyricists to the party starters to the social commentators, it's doing great.

    Horseshit.
    How is hip hop falling off and completely out of the mainstream a good thing?
    It's a good thing for blacks to be relegated to chitlin circuits?
    It's ok for the money stream to dry up for blacks?
    No...
    This the soft mentality that has made the rock landscape white as 🤬 ... How we not profiting off some 🤬 we created?
    I don't know why u 🤬 think this is some profound post.

    I think the profundity of his post lies in the fact that, unlike rock, jazz, or blues, hip-hop will ALWAYS find a way. It quite literally is the voice of the youth. Especially black youth. There are nuances to this hip-hop 🤬 that these hipsters, business suits, 🤬 boys, and outsiders can't understand.

    Hip-hop culture is layered beyond their comprehension. And I feel like those layers add a level of redundancy that those genres I mentioned didn't have. I agree that we should see dollars for our craft, but to look down your nose at the grassroots level, or the "chitlin circuit", is crazy. This ain't like our grandparents' days when black artists had to sell their souls for two nickels to rub together. Nah. The chitlin circuit of today includes touring all over the globe, merchandising, and Internet exposure. All while maintaining your artistic integrity, making dough, AND influencing the culture. Tech 9 is on the chitlin circuit. Joey Bada$$ is on the chitlin circuit. You think them 🤬 hurtin financially? Doubtful...

    How is that a bad thing? Cuz you ain't on Billboard? Cuz you don't have a Grammy? 🤬 those empty ass accolades. Gimme a microphone and a room full of fans and I'm good.

    🤬 need to stop chasing that white rabbit and snap back to reality.



  • Cabana_Da_Don
    Cabana_Da_Don Members Posts: 7,992 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2013
    Of course it is, more money to be made if everybody gets it
    DAMN 🤬 .BOMBS DROPPING AS YOU TYPE.
  • BrazilianHairMoney
    BrazilianHairMoney Members Posts: 2,481 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2013
    of course.. some people believe there is really no more talent left.. it's because the crakkas is mocking the black race we always believed in the chosen ones and they are trying to deceive the world that all the chosen ones are selling out, so now they are the chosen ones.


    FYI they don't like 🤬 or 🤬 lovers..."
  • MarcusGarvey
    MarcusGarvey Members Posts: 4,569 ✭✭✭✭✭
    of course.. some people believe there is really no more talent left.. it's because the crakkas is mocking the black race we always believed in the chosen ones and they are trying to deceive the world that all the chosen ones are selling out, so now they are the chosen ones.


    FYI they don't like 🤬 or 🤬 lovers..."

    Plenty of black people aiding in the effort. To paraphrase Ms Hill, our own Clan is acting up.
  • Wild Self
    Wild Self Members Posts: 4,226 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The question we need to be asking: WHEN did the decline start and WHO is merely responsible for bringing in the 🤬 ? We all know the execs in power funded it but from an artist standpoint..WHO?

    When people loved the NWA lifestyle over PE.