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Calisthenics vs Weight Lifting

dwade206
dwade206 Members Posts: 11,558 ✭✭✭✭✭
It's generally agreed that in order to be massive, lifting weights is essential but it has also been proven you can still build a substantial amount of mass just doing calisthenics. Being 210 and in shape, I noticed that even without using the bar, I'm still getting good results. A usual day at the gym consists of 150 pull-ups, 250 dips, cardio, and sometimes 200 push-ups (machine presses for legs). On off days I do around 500 push-ups and maybe twice a week I'll use dumbells for a short bicep workout and the machines for a quick tricep workout.
Overall I noticed that my results have been slightly better as opposed to when I would primarily focus on weight lifting. I still have the same mass and now I'm getting more toned. Though weight lifting and calisthenics both have their advantages, which do you prefer?

Comments

  • King_MOEbra
    King_MOEbra Members Posts: 8,323 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I love both of them, but calisthenics give you that brute strength...the strength that'll tear someone apart. Weight lifting is great and all(and I lift very heavy), but there's nothing like being 230lbs like me at only 5'8" and doing push-ups, pull-ups, chin-ups and dips like it's water. A lot of weight lifters can't do a single pull-up.
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  • dwade206
    dwade206 Members Posts: 11,558 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I love both of them, but calisthenics give you that brute strength...the strength that'll tear someone apart. Weight lifting is great and all(and I lift very heavy), but there's nothing like being 230lbs like me at only 5'8" and doing push-ups, pull-ups, chin-ups and dips like it's water. A lot of weight lifters can't do a single pull-up.

    Yeah I noticed a lot of fighters get their strength from calisthenics. The only thing I don't like is that there aren't really any calisthenics for legs.
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  • King_MOEbra
    King_MOEbra Members Posts: 8,323 ✭✭✭✭✭
    dwade206 wrote: »
    I love both of them, but calisthenics give you that brute strength...the strength that'll tear someone apart. Weight lifting is great and all(and I lift very heavy), but there's nothing like being 230lbs like me at only 5'8" and doing push-ups, pull-ups, chin-ups and dips like it's water. A lot of weight lifters can't do a single pull-up.

    Yeah I noticed a lot of fighters get their strength from calisthenics. The only thing I don't like is that there aren't really any calisthenics for legs.
    For legs, you can do body weight squats, mountain climbers, jumping jacks, body weight lunges, and half-burpees. Them non-weight leg workouts aren't as great as doing weight lifting leg workouts, but they can still be effective.
  • Splackavelli
    Splackavelli I'll getchu bitch!!! Somewhere drunk off my ass.Members Posts: 18,806 ✭✭✭✭✭
    i'll do like 3 sets of pushups and dips (reverse bench push ups) before my upper body workouts but how do you do 200 push ups dips etc? do you do them straight through or do you do them in sets? I'm afraid i'll cramp up or catch a muscle spasm. I do 100 1 inch push ups on my lower body and middle body days. I'll look into high rep calisthenics when I drop all this weight.
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  • dwade206
    dwade206 Members Posts: 11,558 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Started to incorporate more heavy free weight exercises with calisthenics. I'm starting to see gains already.
  • Noble Al Lee
    Noble Al Lee only whats necessary Members Posts: 914 ✭✭✭✭✭
    They should be balanced out imo. No need to eschew one for the other. I do my best to weight train as well as do calesthentics, with yoga and deep stretching thrown in to maintain flexibility and help with muscle growth
  • dalyricalbandit
    dalyricalbandit Co-Owner Of AllhipHop.com, Super Moderator, Administrator, Moderator Members, Moderators Posts: 67,918 Regulator

    crazy 🤬 last year I went up to the Heights Carbrini Park to play ball but it was a wait time of like 4 nexts games so me and my 3 boys start stretching and what not and so that black dude u see there was on them bars but was super low key so we did about a rep of push ups, Pull up and dips so son was like thats it do another set ya got time so we started doing them buy the 4 set i aint about that life im bout to call it quits son start to spit some motivational 🤬 and start to 🤬 it on them bars son made me do 12 sets and Max out on the last one.

    GOAT workout i ever did, i dead ass was launching that basketball tho when it was my time to ball
  • sobek
    sobek Members Posts: 5,611 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I mainly do calisthenics. I love challenge of mastering my own weight. I actually became inspired by watching videos of them dudes in NY like Hannibal. I used to lift a lot of weight and was swole, but I ended switching to calisthenics do to the injuries associated with going heaver with weights and not using perfect form.

    I did nothing but calisthenics for about a 2 years straight and found that I could actually still lift the same amount of weight in the gym as I was when I was doing nothing but weightlifting.

    I still do lift a little now and then because I do like it, but I mainly just do it because I had these broads thirsty as hell when I was at my biggest.

    I think both go great together though especially if you're using calisthenics as your main workout.
  • LUClEN
    LUClEN Absence makes the heart grow fonder of someone else Members Posts: 20,559 ✭✭✭✭✭
    There was a study done that found lighter weight with higher volume was as good at initiating muscle protein synthesis as heavy weights at low volume


    http://www.mcmaster.ca/opr/html/opr/media/main/NewsReleases/Lightweightsarejustasgoodforbuildingmusclegettingstrongerresearchersfind.htm

    Lifting less weight more times is just as effective at building muscle as training with heavy weights, a finding by McMaster researchers that turns conventional wisdom on its head.



    The key to muscle gain, say the researchers, is working to the point of fatigue.



    “We found that loads that were quite heavy and comparatively light were equally effective at inducing muscle growth and promoting strength,” says Cam Mitchell, one of the lead authors of the study and a PhD candidate in the Department of Kinesiology.



    The research, published in the Journal of Applied Physiology, challenges the widely accepted dogma that training with heavy weights—which can be lifted only six to 12 times before fatigue—is the best avenue to muscle growth.



    “Many older adults can have joint problems which would prevent them training with heavy loads,” says Mitchell. “This study shows that they have the option of training with lighter and less intimidating loads and can still receive the benefits.”



    For the study, a series of experiments were conducted on healthy, young male volunteers to measure how their leg muscles reacted to different forms of resistance training over a period of 10 weeks.



    The researchers first determined the maximum weight each subject could lift one time in a knee extension. Each subject was assigned to a different training program for each leg.



    In all, three different programs were used in combinations that required the volunteers to complete sets of as many repetitions as possible with their assigned loads – typically eight to 12 times per set at the heaviest weights and 25-30 times at the lowest weights.



    The three programs used in the combinations were:
    - one set at 80% of the maximum load
    - three sets at 80% of the maximum
    - three sets at 30% of the maximum



    After 10 weeks of training, three times per week, the heavy and light groups that lifted three sets saw significant gains in muscle volume—as measured by MRI—with no difference among the groups. Still, the group that used heavier weights for three sets developed a bit more strength.



    The group that trained for a single set showed approximately half the increase in muscle size seen in both the heavy and light groups.



    “The complexity of current resistance training guidelines may deter some people from resistance training and therefore from receiving the associated health benefits,” says Stuart Phillips, a professor in the Department of Kinesiology and supervisor of the study. “Our study provides evidence for a simpler paradigm, where a much broader range of loads including quite light loads can induce muscle growth, provided it is lifted to the point where it is difficult to maintain good form.
  • dwade206
    dwade206 Members Posts: 11,558 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Trashboat wrote: »
    There was a study done that found lighter weight with higher volume was as good at initiating muscle protein synthesis as heavy weights at low volume


    http://www.mcmaster.ca/opr/html/opr/media/main/NewsReleases/Lightweightsarejustasgoodforbuildingmusclegettingstrongerresearchersfind.htm

    Lifting less weight more times is just as effective at building muscle as training with heavy weights, a finding by McMaster researchers that turns conventional wisdom on its head.



    The key to muscle gain, say the researchers, is working to the point of fatigue.



    “We found that loads that were quite heavy and comparatively light were equally effective at inducing muscle growth and promoting strength,” says Cam Mitchell, one of the lead authors of the study and a PhD candidate in the Department of Kinesiology.



    The research, published in the Journal of Applied Physiology, challenges the widely accepted dogma that training with heavy weights—which can be lifted only six to 12 times before fatigue—is the best avenue to muscle growth.



    “Many older adults can have joint problems which would prevent them training with heavy loads,” says Mitchell. “This study shows that they have the option of training with lighter and less intimidating loads and can still receive the benefits.”



    For the study, a series of experiments were conducted on healthy, young male volunteers to measure how their leg muscles reacted to different forms of resistance training over a period of 10 weeks.



    The researchers first determined the maximum weight each subject could lift one time in a knee extension. Each subject was assigned to a different training program for each leg.



    In all, three different programs were used in combinations that required the volunteers to complete sets of as many repetitions as possible with their assigned loads – typically eight to 12 times per set at the heaviest weights and 25-30 times at the lowest weights.



    The three programs used in the combinations were:
    - one set at 80% of the maximum load
    - three sets at 80% of the maximum
    - three sets at 30% of the maximum



    After 10 weeks of training, three times per week, the heavy and light groups that lifted three sets saw significant gains in muscle volume—as measured by MRI—with no difference among the groups. Still, the group that used heavier weights for three sets developed a bit more strength.



    The group that trained for a single set showed approximately half the increase in muscle size seen in both the heavy and light groups.



    “The complexity of current resistance training guidelines may deter some people from resistance training and therefore from receiving the associated health benefits,” says Stuart Phillips, a professor in the Department of Kinesiology and supervisor of the study. “Our study provides evidence for a simpler paradigm, where a much broader range of loads including quite light loads can induce muscle growth, provided it is lifted to the point where it is difficult to maintain good form.

    You won't put on mass with light weights. It depends on your goals.
  • LUClEN
    LUClEN Absence makes the heart grow fonder of someone else Members Posts: 20,559 ✭✭✭✭✭
    dwade206 wrote: »
    Trashboat wrote: »
    There was a study done that found lighter weight with higher volume was as good at initiating muscle protein synthesis as heavy weights at low volume


    http://www.mcmaster.ca/opr/html/opr/media/main/NewsReleases/Lightweightsarejustasgoodforbuildingmusclegettingstrongerresearchersfind.htm

    Lifting less weight more times is just as effective at building muscle as training with heavy weights, a finding by McMaster researchers that turns conventional wisdom on its head.



    The key to muscle gain, say the researchers, is working to the point of fatigue.



    “We found that loads that were quite heavy and comparatively light were equally effective at inducing muscle growth and promoting strength,” says Cam Mitchell, one of the lead authors of the study and a PhD candidate in the Department of Kinesiology.



    The research, published in the Journal of Applied Physiology, challenges the widely accepted dogma that training with heavy weights—which can be lifted only six to 12 times before fatigue—is the best avenue to muscle growth.



    “Many older adults can have joint problems which would prevent them training with heavy loads,” says Mitchell. “This study shows that they have the option of training with lighter and less intimidating loads and can still receive the benefits.”



    For the study, a series of experiments were conducted on healthy, young male volunteers to measure how their leg muscles reacted to different forms of resistance training over a period of 10 weeks.



    The researchers first determined the maximum weight each subject could lift one time in a knee extension. Each subject was assigned to a different training program for each leg.



    In all, three different programs were used in combinations that required the volunteers to complete sets of as many repetitions as possible with their assigned loads – typically eight to 12 times per set at the heaviest weights and 25-30 times at the lowest weights.



    The three programs used in the combinations were:
    - one set at 80% of the maximum load
    - three sets at 80% of the maximum
    - three sets at 30% of the maximum



    After 10 weeks of training, three times per week, the heavy and light groups that lifted three sets saw significant gains in muscle volume—as measured by MRI—with no difference among the groups. Still, the group that used heavier weights for three sets developed a bit more strength.



    The group that trained for a single set showed approximately half the increase in muscle size seen in both the heavy and light groups.



    “The complexity of current resistance training guidelines may deter some people from resistance training and therefore from receiving the associated health benefits,” says Stuart Phillips, a professor in the Department of Kinesiology and supervisor of the study. “Our study provides evidence for a simpler paradigm, where a much broader range of loads including quite light loads can induce muscle growth, provided it is lifted to the point where it is difficult to maintain good form.

    You won't put on mass with light weights. It depends on your goals.

    Not the same mass
    It builds slow twitch fibers rather than fast twitch which doesn't give that body builder look

    The study found it does build muscle though
  • playmaker88
    playmaker88 Boy, I tell you that's vision Like Tony Romo when he hitting Witten Members Posts: 67,905 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I do pretty much all calisthenics and have carved out a decent build as a result.

    Not bulky but pretty much all muscle .. also generally when you do bodyweight exercises its something you do all the time I've seen ppl fall of from going to the gym and lose their physique and look like a totally different person. Its whatever works for you, now adays people love to tout a particular routine and product while discarding tried and true methods.. there are 1000 ways to get fit and reach your goals there is no right approach aside from quality reps in whatever you do
  • King_MOEbra
    King_MOEbra Members Posts: 8,323 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I like heavy weight with high reps.
  • dwade206
    dwade206 Members Posts: 11,558 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Trashboat wrote: »
    dwade206 wrote: »
    Trashboat wrote: »
    There was a study done that found lighter weight with higher volume was as good at initiating muscle protein synthesis as heavy weights at low volume


    http://www.mcmaster.ca/opr/html/opr/media/main/NewsReleases/Lightweightsarejustasgoodforbuildingmusclegettingstrongerresearchersfind.htm

    Lifting less weight more times is just as effective at building muscle as training with heavy weights, a finding by McMaster researchers that turns conventional wisdom on its head.



    The key to muscle gain, say the researchers, is working to the point of fatigue.



    “We found that loads that were quite heavy and comparatively light were equally effective at inducing muscle growth and promoting strength,” says Cam Mitchell, one of the lead authors of the study and a PhD candidate in the Department of Kinesiology.



    The research, published in the Journal of Applied Physiology, challenges the widely accepted dogma that training with heavy weights—which can be lifted only six to 12 times before fatigue—is the best avenue to muscle growth.



    “Many older adults can have joint problems which would prevent them training with heavy loads,” says Mitchell. “This study shows that they have the option of training with lighter and less intimidating loads and can still receive the benefits.”



    For the study, a series of experiments were conducted on healthy, young male volunteers to measure how their leg muscles reacted to different forms of resistance training over a period of 10 weeks.



    The researchers first determined the maximum weight each subject could lift one time in a knee extension. Each subject was assigned to a different training program for each leg.



    In all, three different programs were used in combinations that required the volunteers to complete sets of as many repetitions as possible with their assigned loads – typically eight to 12 times per set at the heaviest weights and 25-30 times at the lowest weights.



    The three programs used in the combinations were:
    - one set at 80% of the maximum load
    - three sets at 80% of the maximum
    - three sets at 30% of the maximum



    After 10 weeks of training, three times per week, the heavy and light groups that lifted three sets saw significant gains in muscle volume—as measured by MRI—with no difference among the groups. Still, the group that used heavier weights for three sets developed a bit more strength.



    The group that trained for a single set showed approximately half the increase in muscle size seen in both the heavy and light groups.



    “The complexity of current resistance training guidelines may deter some people from resistance training and therefore from receiving the associated health benefits,” says Stuart Phillips, a professor in the Department of Kinesiology and supervisor of the study. “Our study provides evidence for a simpler paradigm, where a much broader range of loads including quite light loads can induce muscle growth, provided it is lifted to the point where it is difficult to maintain good form.

    You won't put on mass with light weights. It depends on your goals.

    Not the same mass
    It builds slow twitch fibers rather than fast twitch which doesn't give that body builder look

    The study found it does build muscle though

    Yeah l, as I said, you won't put on mass with light weights. It depends on your goals.
  • thephantasm
    thephantasm Members Posts: 565 ✭✭✭
    exercize is exercize
  • the dukester
    the dukester Members Posts: 1,822 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Calisthenics give you muscle definition, and make you explosive (fast twitch muscle fibers). Weight lifting makes you big & bulky, and gives you slow twitch muscle fibers (balloon muscles).

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  • playmaker88
    playmaker88 Boy, I tell you that's vision Like Tony Romo when he hitting Witten Members Posts: 67,905 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2015
    oh i posted in this thread.