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Colin Kaepernick refuses “to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses Black people”...

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  • stringer bell
    stringer bell Members Posts: 26,212 ✭✭✭✭✭
    http://thehill.com/homenews/news/361135-ex-nfl-star-protests-should-have-been-stopped-at-the-very-beginning
    Ex-NFL star: Protests should have been stopped 'at the very beginning'

    A former NFL player said the protests during the national anthem should have been stopped from the start.

    “I absolutely think the protests are so upsetting, and I blame the commissioner,” Herschel Walker said, referring to NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, according to the New York Post.

    “I know people are going to be angry when I say it, but he should have stopped the protests at the very beginning."

    Walker told the New York Post the flag is "very special."

    "Black lives matter, but what we should do is go to Washington after the season and protest there instead," he said, according to the New York Post.

    "We have young men and women fighting for the flag. And we have to respect the White House.”

    In the 1980s, Walker played for President Trump's USFL New Jersey Generals.

    President Trump spurred controversy earlier this year when he lashed out at NFL players for protesting during the national anthem.

    Trump called for the NFL to implement a rule requiring players to stand during the anthem, saying it was disrespectful to the flag and the country's soldiers to kneel.


    A poll earlier this month found a majority of voters disapprove of how Goodell has handled the protests during the national anthem.

    At the league’s fall meeting last month, Goodell and several team owners decided they would not change the NFL’s policy to require players to stand.
  • stringer bell
    stringer bell Members Posts: 26,212 ✭✭✭✭✭
    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/papa-johns-reversal-nfl-protests-wont-fly-164653920.html
    Why Papa John's reversal on NFL protests won't fly

    Papa John’s is attempting a public reversal.

    The company, on its official Twitter account, apologized last week for “statements made on our earnings call” two weeks earlier. On the Nov. 1 call, Papa John’s reported same-store sales growth of just 1% in the quarter, which missed analyst expectations. CEO John Schnatter blamed the flat sales on the NFL: “The NFL has hurt us by not resolving the current debacle to the players’ and owners’ satisfaction… NFL leadership has hurt Papa John’s shareholders.”

    Now, in three tweets, Papa John’s says those comments “were describing the factors that impact our business and we sincerely apologize to anyone that thought they were divisive. That definitely was not our intention… We believe in the right to protest inequality and support the players’ movement to create a new platform for change. We also believe together, as Americans, we should honor our anthem. There is a way to do both.”

    Is there, really?

    Certainly it is possible for players to protest during the national anthem while still honoring the anthem and the flag — a number of players have sought alternate ways to do this, such as standing with linked arms rather than kneeling. But in 2017, football fans have generally not allowed brands to play to both sides of the political controversy hanging over this NFL season.

    Papa John’s is trying to have it both ways at a time when consumers will not allow it.

    Protests “should have been nipped in the bud”

    Pizza lovers may find it difficult to take Papa John’s at its word when it now says, “We support the players’ movement,” because it is such a direct contradiction of comments Schnatter himself made on the earnings call.

    Schnatter mentioned the NFL 44 times on the call. Among other digs at leadership, he most notably said that the player protests, “should have been nipped in the bud” by the NFL last season, when Colin Kaepernick first started kneeling. That comment matches comments made by President Donald Trump ; Schnatter donated to Trump’s campaign. Schnatter’s comment also matches comments made by Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, who is currently fighting a “civil war” against his fellow owners and commissioner Roger Goodell. Jones is a Papa John’s franchisee, which has led some to speculate that Jones was behind Schnatter’s comments .

    Now Schnatter’s company says it supports the players. But it also says, “We should honor our anthem.” And there is recent history to suggest that brands cannot effectively claim to do both at once.

    Nike, Bose and other brands have taken sides

    After the third weekend of this NFL season, when Trump unleashed a verbal tirade on the NFL at a Sept. 22 rally in Alabama and players across the league responded by kneeling or linking arms, NFL corporate sponsors were pushed to issue statements. Most stayed silent, but a handful issued statements that proved telling.

    Nike was unequivocal: “Nike supports athletes and their right to freedom of expression on issues that are of great importance to our society.” Hyundai took the same tone: “We stand for and respect individuals’ freedoms to express their first amendment rights in any peaceful manner in which they choose. We also stand for inclusion, freedom and all that represents those values.”

    Bose, on the other hand, put out a statement that emphasized the flag first, and ended with support for freedom of expression, but added a hedge: “Bose was founded in the United States, and our world headquarters is in Massachusetts, where it’s been for over 50 years. It’s now surrounded by several other Bose facilities — and at all of them, at all times, we proudly fly the American flag. It’s a symbol of our great country which protects the freedom for every person to express their views. We respect that freedom, whether we agree with those views or not.”

    Under Armour issued a tweet that said the company “stands for the flag and by our Athletes for free speech, expression and a unified America.”

    It was seen by many as an attempt to have it both ways. And there is relevant context here: Under Armour had been burned already this year for its political stance. In January, CEO Kevin Plank, in a CNBC interview, called Trump an “asset for this country.” That led Under Armour sponsored athletes like Steph Curry, Misty Copeland, and Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson to speak out against Trump and Plank.

    So it was understandable that Under Armour was reluctant to appear to take an obvious side either way (that is: for the player protests or against them, with Trump), but the effect was a net zero.

    Papa John’s is attempting to do the same, but it’s two weeks late. Consumers might wonder: if Papa John’s is sorry for what Schnatter said, why did it take 14 days to say so? It appears more like an effort at PR damage control.

    It’s worth noting, also, that Papa John’s didn’t pull back the actual claim that the NFL is to blame for its flat sales. It apologized not for the claims, but “to anyone that thought they were divisive.”

    Of course, whether or not the NFL ratings dip is really the cause of Papa John’s disappointing sales is no longer the point. The larger question is how much damage has been done to the brand’s reputation after Schnatter’s comments, and after it was named the favorite pizza of Nazis .

    And a middle-finger emoji directed to Nazis in a tweet isn’t likely to undo the damage overnight.
  • Bcotton5
    Bcotton5 Members Posts: 51,851 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Good. 🤬 a Papa John's
  • R0mp
    R0mp Keep Moving. Members Posts: 4,250 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Our grandparents/ancestors spent forever holding our country's feet to the fire when it comes to actually upholding the ideals it purports to possess, all the while being called anti-American and unpatriotic for doing so.

    Nothing has changed, really.
  • stringer bell
    stringer bell Members Posts: 26,212 ✭✭✭✭✭
    https://www.mediaite.com/tv/cowboys-owner-jerry-jones-i-appreciate-trump-tweeting-about-nfl-anthem-protests/
    Cowboys Owner Jerry Jones: ‘I Appreciate’ Trump Tweeting About NFL Anthem Protests

    Besides taking more shots at LaVar Ball during his Wednesday morning tweetstorm, President Donald Trump also hit on one of his favorite topics — NFL players kneeling during the national anthem to protest racial and social injustice. Addressing reports that the league and players are considering a measure in which teams won’t come out on the field while the anthem plays, Trump complained that this would be “almost as bad as kneeling.”

    Speaking to CNN’s Coy Wire on Wednesday, Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones Said that he appreciated that the president continued to speak out on the issue. He also referenced Trump’s time of being a USFL football team owner.

    “Donald Trump is a longtime fan of sport and longtime fan of football and has been involved as (an) owner in professional football, so he has some knowledge,” Jones stated.

    “I certainly think that the thing he is addressing is certainly a part of how we want to make our game better,” the Cowboys owner noted.

    He continued, “There’s no question because of our visibility, our substantiveness, that we are looked to for social responsibility as well. This is all a part of what I’ve been talking about with the commissioner, and certainly I appreciate not only the President, but I want everybody to be a fan of the Dallas Cowboys. And I want to do everything I can to make them a fan of the Cowboys or the NFL. I just appreciate the interest.”

  • stringer bell
    stringer bell Members Posts: 26,212 ✭✭✭✭✭
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/sports/wp/2017/11/21/nfl-owners-weighing-change-to-anthem-policy-for-next-season-if-protests-continue/?utm_term=.36acb7fc9fbd
    NFL owners could change anthem policy next season if protests continue

    Some NFL owners believe there is a strong possibility they will enact an offseason change to the league’s national anthem policy if players’ protests during the anthem persist through the end of this season, reverting to a previous approach of keeping players in the locker room while the anthem is played, according to several people familiar with the league’s inner workings.

    “I think that if players are still kneeling at the end of the year, then it could very well happen,” said one person familiar with the owners’ deliberations on anthem-related issues.

    That person said it was “too early to tell” for certain if the change to the anthem policy will be made by owners and the league. The person was “not sure” if a formal vote of the owners would be required to enact such a change but said, “I think most owners would support it, particularly if players continue to kneel this season.”

    Those sentiments were echoed by several others with knowledge of the owners’ thinking on the matter. They said they did not know at this point exactly how many owners would favor such an approach, and they cautioned that there have been no detailed discussions yet about leaving teams and players in the locker room for the anthem because owners did not consider it appropriate to make an in-season change to the policy.

    But they agreed that if the protests last all season and remain intensely controversial among fans, the issue will be raised during the offseason and a policy change to having players remain in the locker room until the anthem’s conclusion would have the support of a significant number of owners. They said the matter could be addressed at the annual league meeting in March.

    “It would certainly have to be considered very strongly,” said an official with an NFL franchise who is familiar with the thinking of that team’s owner on the matter.


    The NFL declined to comment.

    The change to having players and coaches on the sideline for the anthem was made in 2009. The current league policy says that players must be on the sideline for the anthem. It suggests but does not require that players stand for the anthem.

    At various points this season some players, including full teams, have remained off the field during the playing of the anthem. They have not been fined or otherwise disciplined by the NFL.

    The league has been under intense pressure from President Trump and some fans to require players to stand during the anthem. In September, Trump said during a campaign speech in Alabama that owners should fire any player who protested during the anthem. His fiery speech included a reference to such a player being a “son of a 🤬 ,” and it fueled an intense national controversy over the issue.

    The pressure from the White House has not relented. After Oakland Raiders running back Marshawn Lynch refused to stand for the U.S. anthem before Sunday’s game against the New England Patriots in Mexico City, Trump offered critical comments Monday on Twitter.

    “Marshawn Lynch of the NFL’s Oakland Raiders stands for the Mexican Anthem and sits down to boos for our national anthem,” Trump wrote. “Great disrespect! Next time NFL should suspend him for remainder of season. Attendance and ratings way down.”


    Owners held a series of meetings last month in New York focused on the anthem and related topics. Owners met with representatives of the players, then held their regularly scheduled fall owners’ meeting. Owners emerged from those meetings without enacting a rule requiring players to stand for the anthem. But even without such a requirement, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and owners said they wanted players to stand.

    “We believe everyone should stand for the national anthem,” Goodell said at the conclusion of the October owners’ meeting. “That’s an important part of our policy. It’s also an important part of our game that we all take great pride in. And it’s also important for us to honor our flag and our country, and we think our fans expect us to do that.”

    Goodell and owners said then that they were focused on discussions with the players about league support of players’ community activism. They said they hoped that such support would convince players to voluntarily stand for the anthem, although they cautioned there was no formal or implied agreement that NFL support of players’ activism would lead to all players standing.

    “This is not a trade-off,” Jed York, the chief executive officer of the San Francisco 49ers, said at the October meeting. “From what I’ve read, there are some players that have said that they’re still not considering standing yet. And that never came up in the meeting. … This has been, ‘How do we take protest to progress?’ How do we make sure that we move these issues forward that matter to the players and I think that matter to the owners?”

    Players and owners have not had a face-to-face meeting since then and have not completed a formal policy for league support of players’ activism. But the conversations have continued, and an agreement could be coming.

    Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones said he would bench any player on his team who protested during the anthem and thereby, in Jones’s view, showed disrespect to the American flag. But other owners said at the October meeting that the overwhelming majority of owners wanted players to stand for the anthem but did not want to enact a rule requiring it.

    The players’ protest movement began last season with quarterback Colin Kaepernick, then with the 49ers. He refused to stand for the anthem to protest racial inequality in the U.S. and the treatment of African Americans by police. Kaepernick was not signed by an NFL team this season and has filed a grievance accusing teams of collusion.

    The NFL’s current policy is in its game operations manual, sent by the league to teams, and not in its publicly available rule book. The policy says: “The national anthem must be played before every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the national anthem.

    “During the national anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition. It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the national anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”

    One NFL sponsor, Papa John’s, recently criticized the NFL for a lack of leadership related to the players’ protests, although the pizza maker later issued an apology to those who believed its stance was divisive. With TV ratings sagging and Jones citing the league’s current financial circumstances as a reason for his bid to stall Goodell’s pending five-year contract extension with the owners, some owners have acknowledged that the anthem controversy and the protests have had an effect on the business of the NFL.

    “We know how important this is to our sponsors, our partners, our licensees,” Goodell said at last month’s owners’ meeting. “It’s important to us, also. We all share that.”
  • marc123
    marc123 Members Posts: 16,999 ✭✭✭✭✭
  • Shizlansky
    Shizlansky Members Posts: 35,095 ✭✭✭✭✭
    That word “ours” is disgusting
  • stringer bell
    stringer bell Members Posts: 26,212 ✭✭✭✭✭
    http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/11/23/colin-kaepernick-visits-alcatraz-to-support-a-native-american-protest/
    Colin Kaepernick visits Alcatraz to support a Native American protest

    SAN FRANCISCO — Former 49ers quarterback and walking political flashpoint Colin Kaepernick received honorary eagle feathers as he attended the annual Indigenous People’s Sunrise Gathering on Alcatraz Island on Thursday.

    The event, also known as “Un-Thanksgiving Day,” celebrates the lengthy occupation of the infamous prison island by Native Americans between 1969 and 1971.

    “Today, I was on Alcatraz Island at the Indigenous People’s Sunrise Gathering, in solidarity with those celebrating their culture and paying respects to those that participated in the 19-month occupation of Alcatraz,” Kaepernick said in a tweet Thursday.
    The former NFL star — who led the 49ers to the 2013 Super Bowl won by the Baltimore Ravens — has been at the center of controversy since he declined to stand for the national anthem before 2016 games, in protest against police brutality toward black people. His defiance spread to other players and engulfed him in a controversy that has seen him vilified by President Donald Trump. He remains an unsigned free agent and has filed a grievance with the NFL alleging he’s being blackballed over his anthem protest.

    After receiving two eagle feathers from a Native American elder, Kaepernick gave a brief speech.

    “I’m very humbled to share this space with all of you,” Kaepernick said in the video posted on Twitter. “Our fight is the same fight. We’re all fighting for our justice, for our freedom. And realizing that we’re in this fight together makes us all the more powerful.”

    The Alcatraz occupation started on Nov. 20, 1969, led by Mohawk activist Richard Oakes and Native American college students, according to the National Park Service, which runs Alcatraz.


    “Once the occupiers had established themselves on the island, organization began immediately,” according to the National Park Service. “An elected council was put into place and everyone on the island had a job; security, sanitation, day-care, school, housing, cooking, laundry, and all decisions were made by unanimous consent of the people.”

    The Alcatraz protesters wanted the deed to Alcatraz, and to establish an Indian university, cultural center and museum, according to the park service.

    “The government negotiators insisted that the occupiers could have none of these and insisted that they leave the island,” according to the park service.

    “The underlying goals of the Indians on Alcatraz were to awaken the American public to the reality of the plight of the first Americans and to assert the need for Indian self-determination.”

    As the occupation progressed, divisions appeared among the activists. Hippies and drug users began “taking up residency,” according to the park service. A fatal fall by Oakes’ 13-year-old daughter, and his subsequent departure, left two competing groups to vie for leadership.

    The federal government took a mostly hands-off approach, but also shut off electrical power and took away a barge providing fresh water to the island.

    Ultimately, President Richard Nixon approved a plan to remove the protesters when the fewest were on Alcatraz, and on June 10, 1971, armed federal marshals, FBI agents and special-forces police “swarmed the island and removed five women, four children, and six unarmed Indian men,” according to the park service.

    “The occupation was over.”

    However, the occupation, directly or indirectly, led the government to adopt Indian self-determination as official U.S. policy, according to the park service.
  • 313 wayz
    313 wayz Members Posts: 2,179 ✭✭✭✭✭

    This bothers me a lot bc Sean mused about voting for Trump..... (despite Trump's racially biased stances on Obama's birth certificate, Muslims, The Wall.....even something closer to his Harlem stomping grounds The Central Park 5, etc).....wish more people would see through this as him being an opportunist
  • playmaker88
    playmaker88 Boy, I tell you that's vision Like Tony Romo when he hitting Witten Members Posts: 67,905 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Si2ssy is an opportunist....lol at my phone insist that diddy be 🤬 ... 🤬 first word to vote or die 🤬 which was a marketing ploy
  • stringer bell
    stringer bell Members Posts: 26,212 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Hypocritical athlete protests demand deeper investigation
    By Phil Mushnick


    With protests now as common as Ethel Merman imitations, it’s time to examine the protesters, starting with those who have exploited the TV-reliant NFL and our national anthem to protest alleged police brutality by racist cops (of all races), one week, President Tweet, the next.

    Oakland’s Marshawn Lynch made big news and noise last Sunday in Mexico City, where he respectfully stood for Mexico’s anthem but then again showed his rude side to the U.S. anthem.

    And if one read and/or listened to reports of this “protest,” one could logically conclude Lynch is a legitimate social activist, an advocate of right over perceived wrongs.

    But if one were to apply Lynch’s NFL bio, his ascension to conspicuous and now international social protester would be — or should be — reported as preposterous.

    In 2008, Lynch, with the Bills, was driving his new Porsche at 3:30 a.m., when he struck a pedestrian then fled. He pleaded guilty to hit-and-run and had his license revoked. But he was still able to play — and for millions of dollars — in the NFL. There’s nothing he can do to prevent that.

    In 2012, Lynch was arrested for DWI then plea-bargained to a reduced charge.

    Three times Lynch “celebrated” a TD by grabbing his crotch. In 2014, the NFL fined him $11,000 for his vulgarity, but Lynch did it again before a national TV audience in the 2015 NFC Championship.

    This season, Lynch was fined for making an obscene gesture during a game.

    Yet, none of this was heard or read in the reports of his “protest” in Mexico City. And although it’s doubtful that any of us could remain employed with his bio, Lynch continues to be employed, this time, a $9 million contract plus “incentives.”

    As a practical matter, protesting players concede that the NFL is a business. Yet, when signing Colin Kaepernick is avoided as a bad business decision — one that will diminish a team’s customers, thus revenue — it’s presented by the wishful as a racial matter, although the league is predominated by well-paid African-Americans.

    Want to take a knee in protest of something before a game? Try this one:

    The annual — as in 89 years — Thanksgiving Day football game between N.J. high schools Neptune and Asbury Park, now mostly attended by African-American kids, last week was postponed before its 90th year in anticipation of “credible threats of violence,” interpreted as gang warfare.

    Throughout the country, high school football and basketball games are now postponed, canceled or ordered played before no spectators due to concerns based on previous violent episodes.

    Also escaping protest examination was that nine-day, one-game shopping trip to China taken by UCLA’s basketball team of student-athletes.

    The three players nailed for shoplifting were explained on ESPN as having “made a mistake.” As reader Howard Heller, asks, “Have you ever made a ‘mistake’ stealing from stores? I thought a mistake is driving past your exit or buying expired milk.” Stealing is a conscious choice.

    And as reader Luis Rosell notes, UCLA is among those schools to declare it would not play in states that have not approved LGBT-sensitive legislation. Yet, UCLA traveled to play in China, known to the Western World for reprehensible human rights deprivations, incarcerations and disappearances.

    As for UCLA’s high-minded no-travel LGBT stance, declared late in 2015, last season it was unexpectedly scheduled to play in one of those banned states, Tennessee — in the NCAA Tournament’s Sweet 16.

    With all that dough at stake? UCLA played in Tennessee. Didn’t hear anything about that on CBS and TNT, did ya?

    But examine the protesters at your own risk. The con job is now King.

    1fusb7s86b7a.gif
  • stringer bell
    stringer bell Members Posts: 26,212 ✭✭✭✭✭
    http://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/21581120/seattle-seahawks-michael-bennett-said-was-honored-receive-unit-coin-vietnam-war-veteran
    Bennett: Honored by Vietnam veteran's gesture

    SANTA CLARA, Calif. -- Seattle Seahawks defensive lineman Michael Bennett said he was honored by a gesture of support he received Sunday from a Vietnam War veteran.

    According to Bennett, the man approached him on the field at Levi's Stadium after Seattle's 24-13 win over the San Francisco 49ers and handed Bennett what he said was his unit coin from Vietnam. Bennett said he didn't know if the man was a 49ers or Seahawks fan.

    "He lost half his battalion. He was telling me about the POWs and the people missing in action. He gave that to me, says he loves everything I stand for," Bennett said, displaying the coin for the assembled media to see. "That's just an honor to be able to get something like that. That's a big deal."

    Before the game, Bennett and several other members of Seattle's defensive line sat on the bench during the national anthem, continuing a protest of racial inequality in the United States that they had halted over the past two weeks. Left tackle Duane Brown took a knee during the anthem Sunday.

    Bennett has said that the protest isn't meant to disrespect the America flag, the anthem or the military.

    "The last couple weeks we wanted to honor the military and everybody, so that was really good," Bennett said.

    As part of the NFL's My Cause, My Cleats initiative, Bennett plans to wear cleats next Sunday honoring families of POW and MIA soldiers. He said previously that he was inspired to do so by watching a PBS documentary about the Vietnam War.

    Bennett also said Sunday he feels it's important to support soldiers who are dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder.

    "So to be able to shine a light on some of the issues that are going on within the military or from after [war] is something I think as Americans we should definitely bring up," he said. "As much as we love everything they do, we should love everything that they're going through too. So just to be able to support them. It was an honor for me to get that [coin]."
  • thegreatunknown
    thegreatunknown Members Posts: 1,474 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Hypocritical athlete protests demand deeper investigation
    By Phil Mushnick


    With protests now as common as Ethel Merman imitations, it’s time to examine the protesters, starting with those who have exploited the TV-reliant NFL and our national anthem to protest alleged police brutality by racist cops (of all races), one week, President Tweet, the next.

    Oakland’s Marshawn Lynch made big news and noise last Sunday in Mexico City, where he respectfully stood for Mexico’s anthem but then again showed his rude side to the U.S. anthem.

    And if one read and/or listened to reports of this “protest,” one could logically conclude Lynch is a legitimate social activist, an advocate of right over perceived wrongs.

    But if one were to apply Lynch’s NFL bio, his ascension to conspicuous and now international social protester would be — or should be — reported as preposterous.

    In 2008, Lynch, with the Bills, was driving his new Porsche at 3:30 a.m., when he struck a pedestrian then fled. He pleaded guilty to hit-and-run and had his license revoked. But he was still able to play — and for millions of dollars — in the NFL. There’s nothing he can do to prevent that.

    In 2012, Lynch was arrested for DWI then plea-bargained to a reduced charge.

    Three times Lynch “celebrated” a TD by grabbing his crotch. In 2014, the NFL fined him $11,000 for his vulgarity, but Lynch did it again before a national TV audience in the 2015 NFC Championship.

    This season, Lynch was fined for making an obscene gesture during a game.

    Yet, none of this was heard or read in the reports of his “protest” in Mexico City. And although it’s doubtful that any of us could remain employed with his bio, Lynch continues to be employed, this time, a $9 million contract plus “incentives.”

    As a practical matter, protesting players concede that the NFL is a business. Yet, when signing Colin Kaepernick is avoided as a bad business decision — one that will diminish a team’s customers, thus revenue — it’s presented by the wishful as a racial matter, although the league is predominated by well-paid African-Americans.

    Want to take a knee in protest of something before a game? Try this one:

    The annual — as in 89 years — Thanksgiving Day football game between N.J. high schools Neptune and Asbury Park, now mostly attended by African-American kids, last week was postponed before its 90th year in anticipation of “credible threats of violence,” interpreted as gang warfare.

    Throughout the country, high school football and basketball games are now postponed, canceled or ordered played before no spectators due to concerns based on previous violent episodes.

    Also escaping protest examination was that nine-day, one-game shopping trip to China taken by UCLA’s basketball team of student-athletes.

    The three players nailed for shoplifting were explained on ESPN as having “made a mistake.” As reader Howard Heller, asks, “Have you ever made a ‘mistake’ stealing from stores? I thought a mistake is driving past your exit or buying expired milk.” Stealing is a conscious choice.

    And as reader Luis Rosell notes, UCLA is among those schools to declare it would not play in states that have not approved LGBT-sensitive legislation. Yet, UCLA traveled to play in China, known to the Western World for reprehensible human rights deprivations, incarcerations and disappearances.

    As for UCLA’s high-minded no-travel LGBT stance, declared late in 2015, last season it was unexpectedly scheduled to play in one of those banned states, Tennessee — in the NCAA Tournament’s Sweet 16.

    With all that dough at stake? UCLA played in Tennessee. Didn’t hear anything about that on CBS and TNT, did ya?

    But examine the protesters at your own risk. The con job is now King.

    1fusb7s86b7a.gif

    Truly grasping at straws here, couldn't make one solid one point on the topic at hand, so he jumped around throwing anything against the wall to see if it would stick. Intellectually lazy, poorly written drivel...
  • marc123
    marc123 Members Posts: 16,999 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Ha! This 🤬 still rambling about anthem protests tho. He is basically the old racist 🤬 at the end of the bar. He is not even a funny troll smh
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