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Colin Kaepernick refuses “to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses Black people”...

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Comments

  • VulcanRaven
    VulcanRaven I don't knowMembers Posts: 18,859 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I dont know if this has been posted or not...

    http://www.theroot.com/articles/history/2016/07/star-spangled-bigotry-the-hidden-racist-history-of-the-national-anthem/

    Star-Spangled Bigotry: The Hidden Racist History of the National Anthem
    Americans generally get a failing grade when it comes to knowing our “patriotic songs.” I know more people who can recite “America, F–k Yeah” from Team America than “America the Beautiful.” “Yankee Doodle”? No one older than a fifth-grader in chorus class remembers the full song. “🤬 Bless America”? More people know the Rev. Jeremiah Wright remix than the actual full lyrics of the song. Most black folks don’t even know “the black national anthem.” (There’s a great story about Bill Clinton being at an NAACP meeting where he was the only one who knew it past the first line. Bill Clinton: Woke in the ’90s.)


    In the case of our national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” perhaps not knowing the full lyrics is a good thing. It is one of the most racist, pro-slavery, anti-black songs in the American lexicon, and you would be wise to cut it from your Fourth of July playlist.

    “The Star-Spangled Banner,” as most Americans know it, is only a couple of lines. In fact, if you look up the song on Google, only the most famous lyrics pop up on Page 1:

    Oh say can you see,
    By the dawn’s early light,
    What so proudly we hailed,
    At the twilight’s last gleaming?

    Whose broad stripes and bright stars,
    Through the perilous fight,
    O’er the ramparts we watched,
    Were so gallantly streaming.

    And thy rocket’s red glare,
    Thy bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof through thee night,
    That our flag was still there.

    Oh say does that star spangled banner yet wave,
    O’er the land of the free, and the home of the brave.

    The story, as most of us are told, is that Francis Scott Key was a prisoner on a British ship during the War of 1812 and wrote this poem while watching the American troops battle back the invading British in Baltimore. That—as is the case with 99 percent of history that is taught in public schools and regurgitated by the mainstream press—is less than half the story.

    To understand the full “Star-Spangled Banner” story, you have to understand the author. Key was an aristocrat and city prosecutor in Washington, D.C. He was, like most enlightened men at the time, not against slavery; he just thought that since blacks were mentally inferior, masters should treat them with more Christian kindness. He supported sending free blacks (not slaves) back to Africa and, with a few exceptions, was about as pro-slavery, anti-black and anti-abolitionist as you could get at the time.


    Of particular note was Key’s opposition to the idea of the Colonial Marines. The Marines were a battalion of runaway slaves who joined with the British Royal Army in exchange for their freedom. The Marines were not only a terrifying example of what slaves would do if given the chance, but also a repudiation of the white superiority that men like Key were so invested in.

    All of these ideas and concepts came together around Aug. 24, 1815, at the Battle of Bladensburg, where Key, who was serving as a lieutenant at the time, ran into a battalion of Colonial Marines. His troops were taken to the woodshed by the very black folks he disdained, and he fled back to his home in Georgetown to lick his wounds. The British troops, emboldened by their victory in Bladensburg, then marched into Washington, D.C., burning the Library of Congress, the Capitol Building and the White House. You can imagine that Key was very much in his feelings seeing black soldiers trampling on the city he so desperately loved.

    A few weeks later, in September of 1815, far from being a captive, Key was on a British boat begging for the release of one of his friends, a doctor named William Beanes. Key was on the boat waiting to see if the British would release his friend when he observed the 🤬 battle of Fort McHenry in Baltimore on Sept. 13, 1815. America lost the battle but managed to inflict heavy casualties on the British in the process. This inspired Key to write “The Star-Spangled Banner” right then and there, but no one remembers that he wrote a full third stanza decrying the former slaves who were now working for the British army:

    And where is that band who so vauntingly swore,
    That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion
    A home and a Country should leave us no more?
    Their blood has wash’d out their foul footstep’s pollution.
    No refuge could save the hireling and slave
    From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave,
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
    O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

    In other words, Key was saying that the blood of all the former slaves and “hirelings” on the battlefield will wash away the pollution of the British invaders. With Key still bitter that some black soldiers got the best of him a few weeks earlier, “The Star-Spangled Banner” is as much a patriotic song as it is a diss track to black people who had the audacity to fight for their freedom. Perhaps that’s why it took almost 100 years for the song to become the national anthem.

    To hear more of the story, there is an excellent short documentary about the history of “The Star-Spangled Banner” by some students at Morgan State University. In the meantime, it might be a good idea to switch up your Fourth of July patriotic playlist.

    Jason Johnson, Political Editor at The Root, is a professor of Political Science at Morgan State's School of Global Journalism and Communications and is a frequent guest on MSNBC, CNN, Al Jazeera International, Fox Business News and SIRIUS XM Satellite Radio. Follow him on Twitter.

    Kap is real for what he is doing.

    This also proves that Christianity is 🤬 and no black person should be following that faith. The 🤬 is Christian kindness?
  • VulcanRaven
    VulcanRaven I don't knowMembers Posts: 18,859 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I dont know if this has been posted or not...

    http://www.theroot.com/articles/history/2016/07/star-spangled-bigotry-the-hidden-racist-history-of-the-national-anthem/

    Star-Spangled Bigotry: The Hidden Racist History of the National Anthem
    Americans generally get a failing grade when it comes to knowing our “patriotic songs.” I know more people who can recite “America, F–k Yeah” from Team America than “America the Beautiful.” “Yankee Doodle”? No one older than a fifth-grader in chorus class remembers the full song. “🤬 Bless America”? More people know the Rev. Jeremiah Wright remix than the actual full lyrics of the song. Most black folks don’t even know “the black national anthem.” (There’s a great story about Bill Clinton being at an NAACP meeting where he was the only one who knew it past the first line. Bill Clinton: Woke in the ’90s.)


    In the case of our national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” perhaps not knowing the full lyrics is a good thing. It is one of the most racist, pro-slavery, anti-black songs in the American lexicon, and you would be wise to cut it from your Fourth of July playlist.

    “The Star-Spangled Banner,” as most Americans know it, is only a couple of lines. In fact, if you look up the song on Google, only the most famous lyrics pop up on Page 1:

    Oh say can you see,
    By the dawn’s early light,
    What so proudly we hailed,
    At the twilight’s last gleaming?

    Whose broad stripes and bright stars,
    Through the perilous fight,
    O’er the ramparts we watched,
    Were so gallantly streaming.

    And thy rocket’s red glare,
    Thy bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof through thee night,
    That our flag was still there.

    Oh say does that star spangled banner yet wave,
    O’er the land of the free, and the home of the brave.

    The story, as most of us are told, is that Francis Scott Key was a prisoner on a British ship during the War of 1812 and wrote this poem while watching the American troops battle back the invading British in Baltimore. That—as is the case with 99 percent of history that is taught in public schools and regurgitated by the mainstream press—is less than half the story.

    To understand the full “Star-Spangled Banner” story, you have to understand the author. Key was an aristocrat and city prosecutor in Washington, D.C. He was, like most enlightened men at the time, not against slavery; he just thought that since blacks were mentally inferior, masters should treat them with more Christian kindness. He supported sending free blacks (not slaves) back to Africa and, with a few exceptions, was about as pro-slavery, anti-black and anti-abolitionist as you could get at the time.


    Of particular note was Key’s opposition to the idea of the Colonial Marines. The Marines were a battalion of runaway slaves who joined with the British Royal Army in exchange for their freedom. The Marines were not only a terrifying example of what slaves would do if given the chance, but also a repudiation of the white superiority that men like Key were so invested in.

    All of these ideas and concepts came together around Aug. 24, 1815, at the Battle of Bladensburg, where Key, who was serving as a lieutenant at the time, ran into a battalion of Colonial Marines. His troops were taken to the woodshed by the very black folks he disdained, and he fled back to his home in Georgetown to lick his wounds. The British troops, emboldened by their victory in Bladensburg, then marched into Washington, D.C., burning the Library of Congress, the Capitol Building and the White House. You can imagine that Key was very much in his feelings seeing black soldiers trampling on the city he so desperately loved.

    A few weeks later, in September of 1815, far from being a captive, Key was on a British boat begging for the release of one of his friends, a doctor named William Beanes. Key was on the boat waiting to see if the British would release his friend when he observed the 🤬 battle of Fort McHenry in Baltimore on Sept. 13, 1815. America lost the battle but managed to inflict heavy casualties on the British in the process. This inspired Key to write “The Star-Spangled Banner” right then and there, but no one remembers that he wrote a full third stanza decrying the former slaves who were now working for the British army:

    And where is that band who so vauntingly swore,
    That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion
    A home and a Country should leave us no more?
    Their blood has wash’d out their foul footstep’s pollution.
    No refuge could save the hireling and slave
    From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave,
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
    O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

    In other words, Key was saying that the blood of all the former slaves and “hirelings” on the battlefield will wash away the pollution of the British invaders. With Key still bitter that some black soldiers got the best of him a few weeks earlier, “The Star-Spangled Banner” is as much a patriotic song as it is a diss track to black people who had the audacity to fight for their freedom. Perhaps that’s why it took almost 100 years for the song to become the national anthem.

    To hear more of the story, there is an excellent short documentary about the history of “The Star-Spangled Banner” by some students at Morgan State University. In the meantime, it might be a good idea to switch up your Fourth of July patriotic playlist.

    Jason Johnson, Political Editor at The Root, is a professor of Political Science at Morgan State's School of Global Journalism and Communications and is a frequent guest on MSNBC, CNN, Al Jazeera International, Fox Business News and SIRIUS XM Satellite Radio. Follow him on Twitter.

    Kap is real for what he is doing.

    This also proves that Christianity is 🤬 and no black person should be following that faith. The 🤬 is Christian kindness?

    It's amazing that with everything mentioned in that article that's what you decided to zero in on smh...

    I read the whole thing but that is a part of the oppression that people seem to ignore. That is also a larger issue as the National Anthem is just a song, while Christianity speaks to mental slavery.
  • Arya Tsaddiq
    Arya Tsaddiq Shalawam The Daughter of BabylonMembers Posts: 15,334 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I dont know if this has been posted or not...

    http://www.theroot.com/articles/history/2016/07/star-spangled-bigotry-the-hidden-racist-history-of-the-national-anthem/

    Star-Spangled Bigotry: The Hidden Racist History of the National Anthem
    Americans generally get a failing grade when it comes to knowing our “patriotic songs.” I know more people who can recite “America, F–k Yeah” from Team America than “America the Beautiful.” “Yankee Doodle”? No one older than a fifth-grader in chorus class remembers the full song. “🤬 Bless America”? More people know the Rev. Jeremiah Wright remix than the actual full lyrics of the song. Most black folks don’t even know “the black national anthem.” (There’s a great story about Bill Clinton being at an NAACP meeting where he was the only one who knew it past the first line. Bill Clinton: Woke in the ’90s.)


    In the case of our national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” perhaps not knowing the full lyrics is a good thing. It is one of the most racist, pro-slavery, anti-black songs in the American lexicon, and you would be wise to cut it from your Fourth of July playlist.

    “The Star-Spangled Banner,” as most Americans know it, is only a couple of lines. In fact, if you look up the song on Google, only the most famous lyrics pop up on Page 1:

    Oh say can you see,
    By the dawn’s early light,
    What so proudly we hailed,
    At the twilight’s last gleaming?

    Whose broad stripes and bright stars,
    Through the perilous fight,
    O’er the ramparts we watched,
    Were so gallantly streaming.

    And thy rocket’s red glare,
    Thy bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof through thee night,
    That our flag was still there.

    Oh say does that star spangled banner yet wave,
    O’er the land of the free, and the home of the brave.

    The story, as most of us are told, is that Francis Scott Key was a prisoner on a British ship during the War of 1812 and wrote this poem while watching the American troops battle back the invading British in Baltimore. That—as is the case with 99 percent of history that is taught in public schools and regurgitated by the mainstream press—is less than half the story.

    To understand the full “Star-Spangled Banner” story, you have to understand the author. Key was an aristocrat and city prosecutor in Washington, D.C. He was, like most enlightened men at the time, not against slavery; he just thought that since blacks were mentally inferior, masters should treat them with more Christian kindness. He supported sending free blacks (not slaves) back to Africa and, with a few exceptions, was about as pro-slavery, anti-black and anti-abolitionist as you could get at the time.


    Of particular note was Key’s opposition to the idea of the Colonial Marines. The Marines were a battalion of runaway slaves who joined with the British Royal Army in exchange for their freedom. The Marines were not only a terrifying example of what slaves would do if given the chance, but also a repudiation of the white superiority that men like Key were so invested in.

    All of these ideas and concepts came together around Aug. 24, 1815, at the Battle of Bladensburg, where Key, who was serving as a lieutenant at the time, ran into a battalion of Colonial Marines. His troops were taken to the woodshed by the very black folks he disdained, and he fled back to his home in Georgetown to lick his wounds. The British troops, emboldened by their victory in Bladensburg, then marched into Washington, D.C., burning the Library of Congress, the Capitol Building and the White House. You can imagine that Key was very much in his feelings seeing black soldiers trampling on the city he so desperately loved.

    A few weeks later, in September of 1815, far from being a captive, Key was on a British boat begging for the release of one of his friends, a doctor named William Beanes. Key was on the boat waiting to see if the British would release his friend when he observed the 🤬 battle of Fort McHenry in Baltimore on Sept. 13, 1815. America lost the battle but managed to inflict heavy casualties on the British in the process. This inspired Key to write “The Star-Spangled Banner” right then and there, but no one remembers that he wrote a full third stanza decrying the former slaves who were now working for the British army:

    And where is that band who so vauntingly swore,
    That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion
    A home and a Country should leave us no more?
    Their blood has wash’d out their foul footstep’s pollution.
    No refuge could save the hireling and slave
    From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave,
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
    O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

    In other words, Key was saying that the blood of all the former slaves and “hirelings” on the battlefield will wash away the pollution of the British invaders. With Key still bitter that some black soldiers got the best of him a few weeks earlier, “The Star-Spangled Banner” is as much a patriotic song as it is a diss track to black people who had the audacity to fight for their freedom. Perhaps that’s why it took almost 100 years for the song to become the national anthem.

    To hear more of the story, there is an excellent short documentary about the history of “The Star-Spangled Banner” by some students at Morgan State University. In the meantime, it might be a good idea to switch up your Fourth of July patriotic playlist.

    Jason Johnson, Political Editor at The Root, is a professor of Political Science at Morgan State's School of Global Journalism and Communications and is a frequent guest on MSNBC, CNN, Al Jazeera International, Fox Business News and SIRIUS XM Satellite Radio. Follow him on Twitter.

    Kap is real for what he is doing.

    This also proves that Christianity is 🤬 and no black person should be following that faith. The 🤬 is Christian kindness?

    It's amazing that with everything mentioned in that article that's what you decided to zero in on smh...

    I read the whole thing but that is a part of the oppression that people seem to ignore. That is also a larger issue as the National Anthem is just a song, while Christianity speaks to mental slavery.

    Ok bro...
  • VulcanRaven
    VulcanRaven I don't knowMembers Posts: 18,859 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I dont know if this has been posted or not...

    http://www.theroot.com/articles/history/2016/07/star-spangled-bigotry-the-hidden-racist-history-of-the-national-anthem/

    Star-Spangled Bigotry: The Hidden Racist History of the National Anthem
    Americans generally get a failing grade when it comes to knowing our “patriotic songs.” I know more people who can recite “America, F–k Yeah” from Team America than “America the Beautiful.” “Yankee Doodle”? No one older than a fifth-grader in chorus class remembers the full song. “🤬 Bless America”? More people know the Rev. Jeremiah Wright remix than the actual full lyrics of the song. Most black folks don’t even know “the black national anthem.” (There’s a great story about Bill Clinton being at an NAACP meeting where he was the only one who knew it past the first line. Bill Clinton: Woke in the ’90s.)


    In the case of our national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” perhaps not knowing the full lyrics is a good thing. It is one of the most racist, pro-slavery, anti-black songs in the American lexicon, and you would be wise to cut it from your Fourth of July playlist.

    “The Star-Spangled Banner,” as most Americans know it, is only a couple of lines. In fact, if you look up the song on Google, only the most famous lyrics pop up on Page 1:

    Oh say can you see,
    By the dawn’s early light,
    What so proudly we hailed,
    At the twilight’s last gleaming?

    Whose broad stripes and bright stars,
    Through the perilous fight,
    O’er the ramparts we watched,
    Were so gallantly streaming.

    And thy rocket’s red glare,
    Thy bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof through thee night,
    That our flag was still there.

    Oh say does that star spangled banner yet wave,
    O’er the land of the free, and the home of the brave.

    The story, as most of us are told, is that Francis Scott Key was a prisoner on a British ship during the War of 1812 and wrote this poem while watching the American troops battle back the invading British in Baltimore. That—as is the case with 99 percent of history that is taught in public schools and regurgitated by the mainstream press—is less than half the story.

    To understand the full “Star-Spangled Banner” story, you have to understand the author. Key was an aristocrat and city prosecutor in Washington, D.C. He was, like most enlightened men at the time, not against slavery; he just thought that since blacks were mentally inferior, masters should treat them with more Christian kindness. He supported sending free blacks (not slaves) back to Africa and, with a few exceptions, was about as pro-slavery, anti-black and anti-abolitionist as you could get at the time.


    Of particular note was Key’s opposition to the idea of the Colonial Marines. The Marines were a battalion of runaway slaves who joined with the British Royal Army in exchange for their freedom. The Marines were not only a terrifying example of what slaves would do if given the chance, but also a repudiation of the white superiority that men like Key were so invested in.

    All of these ideas and concepts came together around Aug. 24, 1815, at the Battle of Bladensburg, where Key, who was serving as a lieutenant at the time, ran into a battalion of Colonial Marines. His troops were taken to the woodshed by the very black folks he disdained, and he fled back to his home in Georgetown to lick his wounds. The British troops, emboldened by their victory in Bladensburg, then marched into Washington, D.C., burning the Library of Congress, the Capitol Building and the White House. You can imagine that Key was very much in his feelings seeing black soldiers trampling on the city he so desperately loved.

    A few weeks later, in September of 1815, far from being a captive, Key was on a British boat begging for the release of one of his friends, a doctor named William Beanes. Key was on the boat waiting to see if the British would release his friend when he observed the 🤬 battle of Fort McHenry in Baltimore on Sept. 13, 1815. America lost the battle but managed to inflict heavy casualties on the British in the process. This inspired Key to write “The Star-Spangled Banner” right then and there, but no one remembers that he wrote a full third stanza decrying the former slaves who were now working for the British army:

    And where is that band who so vauntingly swore,
    That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion
    A home and a Country should leave us no more?
    Their blood has wash’d out their foul footstep’s pollution.
    No refuge could save the hireling and slave
    From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave,
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
    O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

    In other words, Key was saying that the blood of all the former slaves and “hirelings” on the battlefield will wash away the pollution of the British invaders. With Key still bitter that some black soldiers got the best of him a few weeks earlier, “The Star-Spangled Banner” is as much a patriotic song as it is a diss track to black people who had the audacity to fight for their freedom. Perhaps that’s why it took almost 100 years for the song to become the national anthem.

    To hear more of the story, there is an excellent short documentary about the history of “The Star-Spangled Banner” by some students at Morgan State University. In the meantime, it might be a good idea to switch up your Fourth of July patriotic playlist.

    Jason Johnson, Political Editor at The Root, is a professor of Political Science at Morgan State's School of Global Journalism and Communications and is a frequent guest on MSNBC, CNN, Al Jazeera International, Fox Business News and SIRIUS XM Satellite Radio. Follow him on Twitter.

    Kap is real for what he is doing.

    This also proves that Christianity is 🤬 and no black person should be following that faith. The 🤬 is Christian kindness?

    It's amazing that with everything mentioned in that article that's what you decided to zero in on smh...

    I read the whole thing but that is a part of the oppression that people seem to ignore. That is also a larger issue as the National Anthem is just a song, while Christianity speaks to mental slavery.

    All religions are mental slavery.

    I agree. Just that Christianity particularly was used to control blacks.
  • marc123
    marc123 Members Posts: 16,999 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I dont know if this has been posted or not...

    http://www.theroot.com/articles/history/2016/07/star-spangled-bigotry-the-hidden-racist-history-of-the-national-anthem/

    Star-Spangled Bigotry: The Hidden Racist History of the National Anthem
    Americans generally get a failing grade when it comes to knowing our “patriotic songs.” I know more people who can recite “America, F–k Yeah” from Team America than “America the Beautiful.” “Yankee Doodle”? No one older than a fifth-grader in chorus class remembers the full song. “🤬 Bless America”? More people know the Rev. Jeremiah Wright remix than the actual full lyrics of the song. Most black folks don’t even know “the black national anthem.” (There’s a great story about Bill Clinton being at an NAACP meeting where he was the only one who knew it past the first line. Bill Clinton: Woke in the ’90s.)


    In the case of our national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” perhaps not knowing the full lyrics is a good thing. It is one of the most racist, pro-slavery, anti-black songs in the American lexicon, and you would be wise to cut it from your Fourth of July playlist.

    “The Star-Spangled Banner,” as most Americans know it, is only a couple of lines. In fact, if you look up the song on Google, only the most famous lyrics pop up on Page 1:

    Oh say can you see,
    By the dawn’s early light,
    What so proudly we hailed,
    At the twilight’s last gleaming?

    Whose broad stripes and bright stars,
    Through the perilous fight,
    O’er the ramparts we watched,
    Were so gallantly streaming.

    And thy rocket’s red glare,
    Thy bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof through thee night,
    That our flag was still there.

    Oh say does that star spangled banner yet wave,
    O’er the land of the free, and the home of the brave.

    The story, as most of us are told, is that Francis Scott Key was a prisoner on a British ship during the War of 1812 and wrote this poem while watching the American troops battle back the invading British in Baltimore. That—as is the case with 99 percent of history that is taught in public schools and regurgitated by the mainstream press—is less than half the story.

    To understand the full “Star-Spangled Banner” story, you have to understand the author. Key was an aristocrat and city prosecutor in Washington, D.C. He was, like most enlightened men at the time, not against slavery; he just thought that since blacks were mentally inferior, masters should treat them with more Christian kindness. He supported sending free blacks (not slaves) back to Africa and, with a few exceptions, was about as pro-slavery, anti-black and anti-abolitionist as you could get at the time.


    Of particular note was Key’s opposition to the idea of the Colonial Marines. The Marines were a battalion of runaway slaves who joined with the British Royal Army in exchange for their freedom. The Marines were not only a terrifying example of what slaves would do if given the chance, but also a repudiation of the white superiority that men like Key were so invested in.

    All of these ideas and concepts came together around Aug. 24, 1815, at the Battle of Bladensburg, where Key, who was serving as a lieutenant at the time, ran into a battalion of Colonial Marines. His troops were taken to the woodshed by the very black folks he disdained, and he fled back to his home in Georgetown to lick his wounds. The British troops, emboldened by their victory in Bladensburg, then marched into Washington, D.C., burning the Library of Congress, the Capitol Building and the White House. You can imagine that Key was very much in his feelings seeing black soldiers trampling on the city he so desperately loved.

    A few weeks later, in September of 1815, far from being a captive, Key was on a British boat begging for the release of one of his friends, a doctor named William Beanes. Key was on the boat waiting to see if the British would release his friend when he observed the 🤬 battle of Fort McHenry in Baltimore on Sept. 13, 1815. America lost the battle but managed to inflict heavy casualties on the British in the process. This inspired Key to write “The Star-Spangled Banner” right then and there, but no one remembers that he wrote a full third stanza decrying the former slaves who were now working for the British army:

    And where is that band who so vauntingly swore,
    That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion
    A home and a Country should leave us no more?
    Their blood has wash’d out their foul footstep’s pollution.
    No refuge could save the hireling and slave
    From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave,
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
    O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

    In other words, Key was saying that the blood of all the former slaves and “hirelings” on the battlefield will wash away the pollution of the British invaders. With Key still bitter that some black soldiers got the best of him a few weeks earlier, “The Star-Spangled Banner” is as much a patriotic song as it is a diss track to black people who had the audacity to fight for their freedom. Perhaps that’s why it took almost 100 years for the song to become the national anthem.

    To hear more of the story, there is an excellent short documentary about the history of “The Star-Spangled Banner” by some students at Morgan State University. In the meantime, it might be a good idea to switch up your Fourth of July patriotic playlist.

    Jason Johnson, Political Editor at The Root, is a professor of Political Science at Morgan State's School of Global Journalism and Communications and is a frequent guest on MSNBC, CNN, Al Jazeera International, Fox Business News and SIRIUS XM Satellite Radio. Follow him on Twitter.

    Kap is real for what he is doing.

    This also proves that Christianity is 🤬 and no black person should be following that faith. The 🤬 is Christian kindness?

    GOAT!
  • marc123
    marc123 Members Posts: 16,999 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 2016
    I dont know if this has been posted or not...

    http://www.theroot.com/articles/history/2016/07/star-spangled-bigotry-the-hidden-racist-history-of-the-national-anthem/

    Star-Spangled Bigotry: The Hidden Racist History of the National Anthem
    Americans generally get a failing grade when it comes to knowing our “patriotic songs.” I know more people who can recite “America, F–k Yeah” from Team America than “America the Beautiful.” “Yankee Doodle”? No one older than a fifth-grader in chorus class remembers the full song. “🤬 Bless America”? More people know the Rev. Jeremiah Wright remix than the actual full lyrics of the song. Most black folks don’t even know “the black national anthem.” (There’s a great story about Bill Clinton being at an NAACP meeting where he was the only one who knew it past the first line. Bill Clinton: Woke in the ’90s.)


    In the case of our national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” perhaps not knowing the full lyrics is a good thing. It is one of the most racist, pro-slavery, anti-black songs in the American lexicon, and you would be wise to cut it from your Fourth of July playlist.

    “The Star-Spangled Banner,” as most Americans know it, is only a couple of lines. In fact, if you look up the song on Google, only the most famous lyrics pop up on Page 1:

    Oh say can you see,
    By the dawn’s early light,
    What so proudly we hailed,
    At the twilight’s last gleaming?

    Whose broad stripes and bright stars,
    Through the perilous fight,
    O’er the ramparts we watched,
    Were so gallantly streaming.

    And thy rocket’s red glare,
    Thy bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof through thee night,
    That our flag was still there.

    Oh say does that star spangled banner yet wave,
    O’er the land of the free, and the home of the brave.

    The story, as most of us are told, is that Francis Scott Key was a prisoner on a British ship during the War of 1812 and wrote this poem while watching the American troops battle back the invading British in Baltimore. That—as is the case with 99 percent of history that is taught in public schools and regurgitated by the mainstream press—is less than half the story.

    To understand the full “Star-Spangled Banner” story, you have to understand the author. Key was an aristocrat and city prosecutor in Washington, D.C. He was, like most enlightened men at the time, not against slavery; he just thought that since blacks were mentally inferior, masters should treat them with more Christian kindness. He supported sending free blacks (not slaves) back to Africa and, with a few exceptions, was about as pro-slavery, anti-black and anti-abolitionist as you could get at the time.


    Of particular note was Key’s opposition to the idea of the Colonial Marines. The Marines were a battalion of runaway slaves who joined with the British Royal Army in exchange for their freedom. The Marines were not only a terrifying example of what slaves would do if given the chance, but also a repudiation of the white superiority that men like Key were so invested in.

    All of these ideas and concepts came together around Aug. 24, 1815, at the Battle of Bladensburg, where Key, who was serving as a lieutenant at the time, ran into a battalion of Colonial Marines. His troops were taken to the woodshed by the very black folks he disdained, and he fled back to his home in Georgetown to lick his wounds. The British troops, emboldened by their victory in Bladensburg, then marched into Washington, D.C., burning the Library of Congress, the Capitol Building and the White House. You can imagine that Key was very much in his feelings seeing black soldiers trampling on the city he so desperately loved.

    A few weeks later, in September of 1815, far from being a captive, Key was on a British boat begging for the release of one of his friends, a doctor named William Beanes. Key was on the boat waiting to see if the British would release his friend when he observed the 🤬 battle of Fort McHenry in Baltimore on Sept. 13, 1815. America lost the battle but managed to inflict heavy casualties on the British in the process. This inspired Key to write “The Star-Spangled Banner” right then and there, but no one remembers that he wrote a full third stanza decrying the former slaves who were now working for the British army:

    And where is that band who so vauntingly swore,
    That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion
    A home and a Country should leave us no more?
    Their blood has wash’d out their foul footstep’s pollution.
    No refuge could save the hireling and slave
    From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave,
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
    O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

    In other words, Key was saying that the blood of all the former slaves and “hirelings” on the battlefield will wash away the pollution of the British invaders. With Key still bitter that some black soldiers got the best of him a few weeks earlier, “The Star-Spangled Banner” is as much a patriotic song as it is a diss track to black people who had the audacity to fight for their freedom. Perhaps that’s why it took almost 100 years for the song to become the national anthem.

    To hear more of the story, there is an excellent short documentary about the history of “The Star-Spangled Banner” by some students at Morgan State University. In the meantime, it might be a good idea to switch up your Fourth of July patriotic playlist.

    Jason Johnson, Political Editor at The Root, is a professor of Political Science at Morgan State's School of Global Journalism and Communications and is a frequent guest on MSNBC, CNN, Al Jazeera International, Fox Business News and SIRIUS XM Satellite Radio. Follow him on Twitter.

    Kap is real for what he is doing.

    This also proves that Christianity is 🤬 and no black person should be following that faith. The 🤬 is Christian kindness?

    It's amazing that with everything mentioned in that article that's what you decided to zero in on smh...

    I read the whole thing but that is a part of the oppression that people seem to ignore. That is also a larger issue as the National Anthem is just a song, while Christianity speaks to mental slavery.

    All religions are mental slavery.

    This might be the realist line ever typed in the IC.
  • NothingButTheTruth
    NothingButTheTruth stew Members Posts: 10,850 ✭✭✭✭✭
    NCswag wrote: »
    This paper bag colored 🤬 waits until he's benched to start acting up. He wants to get releases and get paid, not stand up for black folks. He did that 🤬 like once last preseason, now he says he won't stop? 🤬 outta here 🤬 .

    This is the ugly truth behind his actions, but I support them nonetheless. We can't expect 🤬 to risk everything just to make a statement, since we are not in a position to support those people financially if they were to fall from the top.

    Just take the positive and keep it moving. The people in the know are very aware of his situation and how they led to him all of a sudden having the "courage" to act. Most of the time, a lot of this 🤬 is simply a media grab, but like I said, I'm more focused on the positive in this situation and the dialogue it creates for the young people who are listening.
  • blackamerica
    blackamerica Members Posts: 2,897 ✭✭✭✭✭
    NCswag wrote: »
    NCswag wrote: »
    En-Fuego22 wrote: »
    NCswag wrote: »
    This paper bag colored 🤬 waits until he's benched to start acting up. He wants to get releases and get paid, not stand up for black folks. He did that 🤬 like once last preseason, now he says he won't stop? 🤬 outta here 🤬 .

    Troll away

    Stop believing 🤬 🤬 trying to throw 🤬 on injustice and look at FSCTS. The 49ers were known to be shopping Colin around. They DON'T WANT HIM and his contract. So you magically wait until now to not respect the flag? This same 🤬 been going on to black folks since his rookie year. Did he do that 🤬 when he was fighting for a roster spot? 🤬 no. But you can say I am trolling if you want to, it's cool l.
    🤬 gon 🤬

    This is an ecample of why people of all other races believe that black people can't have conversations without being ignorant.....and you know what? Generally they are right.
    No that's a 🤬 excuse to 🤬 . The guy is basically throwing his career away for my rights, YOUR rights & other black & brown ppl that are being oppressed in america. This is something we criticize athletes for not doing and when they finally make a stand, 🤬 like you come flying in outta nowhere to be critical. Just be mindful of the fact he's protesting on YOUR behalf risking millions for your dusty azz. Would you do the same?
  • NothingButTheTruth
    NothingButTheTruth stew Members Posts: 10,850 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Vellum wrote: »
    I hear you 🤬 Foster. I just wanna say, um, you cant blame your father whooping your mothers ass on slavery. Not everything can be blamed to racism, or slavery. Some things are just people 🤬 up, and they have to lay in the bed they made. Your father was simply a coward. Like many of our fathers. Racism didnt hold many of them back. Just being a little scared 🤬 did.

    Even crazy Ann Coulter says that the only people that are owed anything in america are black people. Im not denying the economical and psychological effects racism and slavery have had on black people for generations, but im not so sure the psychological effects of that racism still factors in as strongly in current generations 40 and under.

    This idea that young brothas across america who are killing each other, robbing each other, impregnating women out of wedlock and not taking care of their children, not going to college, not working, is not just them 🤬 up is a hard pill to swallow.

    I cant just keep spending my life defaulting back to racism to try to explain away everything while progressing forward in life. At the end of the day, stupid people exist, and stupid 🤬 happens. But sitting around waiting for someone to acknowledge my feelings isnt putting money in my bank account, because no black person in america is ever getting reparations in the form of a big fat check in your account.

    Im sure 🤬 Foster would agree with that statement, considering hard work got him to where he is, and continued hard work will allow him to help others get out of their situations too. Not sitting around crying about racism, which im sure had the least negative impact in his life, considering he grew up in a household of drug abuse and domestic violence like many of us.

    Slavery and Racism did and does most certainly affect the mental state of the man and woman in the black relationship.

    Black people are guinea pigs in this country. We don't control anything, and the way we act is reactionary to the situation they recreate for us. The game they play is to let a few get away so they will look down upon the ones that didn't. The reality of the situation is, if they want to ruin your life by tomorrow, they will do it. You're living behind enemy lines.

    Letting the world know that racism and slavery are still alive and affecting its victims has nothing to do with continuing to progress forward in life. It's actually easier to move forward, when you're aware of the obstacles in front of you.
  • aneed123
    aneed123 Members Posts: 23,763 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 2016
    When u have nothing to lose or no 🤬 to give is when u tell the blunt truth. Of course I wish Colin spoke like this when he was battling Alex Smith or when he went to the super bowl. But 🤬 it he speaking up now and as a black man I support him esp when all the supposed real 🤬 qb are coin who won't stand on their words...word to cam
  • marc123
    marc123 Members Posts: 16,999 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 2016
    I respect Kaep n all he is doin props to him. But ppl who are talkin 🤬 are makin the point that he is doin all this while in a qb battle or bein benched. N why didnt he do it b4 when they were makin the SB run etc. (1. Maybe he didnt feel that strongly about it at that time. 2. Maybe he is confindent now at this point in his life to speak up.)

    Anyhow i say that to say. Thats why i have the upmost respect for Ali. He announced he had joined the NOI the day after winning the heavy weight championship. The toke the ultimate risk. He began speakin on the bs in america when he was at his professional peak. When he had the most to lose. Gotta respect that.

    Jus wanted to mention that.
  • D0wn
    D0wn Members Posts: 10,818 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 2016
    mryounggun wrote: »
    If you are upset at CK for this, it shows you really have NO understanding of the plight of the African American in this country. At all. Because if you did, even if you disagreed with him not standing...you'd understand it. Not mad at Cruz for his comments. They are actually the only types of comments that SHOULD be said by anyone who disagrees. He basically said 'You gotta respect the flag. But CK is a grown man and he can do what the 🤬 he wants. I PERSONALLY disagree, though.'.

    What's far more interesting to me is this broad:

    http://www.bizpacreview.com/2016/08/29/gold-star-mother-replies-kaepernicks-pathetic-actions-heart-exploding-blood-boiling-384479

    Not sure of this has been posted yet, but she's basically saying 'My son fought for the country. He died in Afghanistan for your right to be selfish, self-centered, arrogant, disrespectful, etc. Shame on you.'. If I'm CK, I actually reply to this one like, 'I appreciate your son's sacrifice. But let's not pretend African-American soldiers haven't been getting shot to 🤬 in every major theater of war since this country was founded, coming home and STILL running the risk of being murdered in the streets over a parking ticket or some 🤬 . Simmer down.'

    He already adressed this thoughtfully, in his post game interview.
  • NCswag
    NCswag Members Posts: 2,823 ✭✭✭✭✭
    NCswag wrote: »
    NCswag wrote: »
    En-Fuego22 wrote: »
    NCswag wrote: »
    This paper bag colored 🤬 waits until he's benched to start acting up. He wants to get releases and get paid, not stand up for black folks. He did that 🤬 like once last preseason, now he says he won't stop? 🤬 outta here 🤬 .

    Troll away

    Stop believing 🤬 🤬 trying to throw 🤬 on injustice and look at FSCTS. The 49ers were known to be shopping Colin around. They DON'T WANT HIM and his contract. So you magically wait until now to not respect the flag? This same 🤬 been going on to black folks since his rookie year. Did he do that 🤬 when he was fighting for a roster spot? 🤬 no. But you can say I am trolling if you want to, it's cool l.
    🤬 gon 🤬

    This is an ecample of why people of all other races believe that black people can't have conversations without being ignorant.....and you know what? Generally they are right.
    No that's a 🤬 excuse to 🤬 . The guy is basically throwing his career away for my rights, YOUR rights & other black & brown ppl that are being oppressed in america. This is something we criticize athletes for not doing and when they finally make a stand, 🤬 like you come flying in outta nowhere to be critical. Just be mindful of the fact he's protesting on YOUR behalf risking millions for your dusty azz. Would you do the same?

    WOW. You really believe that, huh? I guess I'll just be a 🤬 then, 🤬 .
  • Vellum
    Vellum Members Posts: 471 ✭✭✭✭
    Am i the only one that doesnt give a 🤬 that francis scott key was racist. No 🤬 . Almost every white american and european back then was a racist idiot. 90+ percent of the people singing the star spangled banner these days arent doing it as a racist chant towards their great francis scott key. 80 percent of them dont even know who he is. LOL. The star spangled banner aint going anywhere, who cares. I mean, its nice to educate a new generation on it i suppose, but its a non issue.

    We enjoy plenty of 🤬 in this country created by racist, slave owners, sexist, ect.. I dont like those 🤬 , but i still enjoy having a constitution like we have, proper secular laws that we have, and not living in some backwoods 🤬 hole in the middle east or africa, where progressives there could only hope to have what we have going on here.

    I get why people care. I dont know. I just dont care. Can we get back to talking police reform please? Not some old ass song half the people forgot the lyrics to, and just mumble before getting hammered on cheap beer at sporting events.
  • mryounggun
    mryounggun Loading up my Grey Matter Glock Members Posts: 13,451 ✭✭✭✭✭
    D0wn wrote: »
    mryounggun wrote: »
    If you are upset at CK for this, it shows you really have NO understanding of the plight of the African American in this country. At all. Because if you did, even if you disagreed with him not standing...you'd understand it. Not mad at Cruz for his comments. They are actually the only types of comments that SHOULD be said by anyone who disagrees. He basically said 'You gotta respect the flag. But CK is a grown man and he can do what the 🤬 he wants. I PERSONALLY disagree, though.'.

    What's far more interesting to me is this broad:

    http://www.bizpacreview.com/2016/08/29/gold-star-mother-replies-kaepernicks-pathetic-actions-heart-exploding-blood-boiling-384479

    Not sure of this has been posted yet, but she's basically saying 'My son fought for the country. He died in Afghanistan for your right to be selfish, self-centered, arrogant, disrespectful, etc. Shame on you.'. If I'm CK, I actually reply to this one like, 'I appreciate your son's sacrifice. But let's not pretend African-American soldiers haven't been getting shot to 🤬 in every major theater of war since this country was founded, coming home and STILL running the risk of being murdered in the streets over a parking ticket or some 🤬 . Simmer down.'

    He already adressed this thoughtfully, in his post game interview.

    Must've missed it. Link or summary?
  • Vellum
    Vellum Members Posts: 471 ✭✭✭✭
    Vellum wrote: »
    I hear you 🤬 Foster. I just wanna say, um, you cant blame your father whooping your mothers ass on slavery. Not everything can be blamed to racism, or slavery. Some things are just people 🤬 up, and they have to lay in the bed they made. Your father was simply a coward. Like many of our fathers. Racism didnt hold many of them back. Just being a little scared 🤬 did.

    Even crazy Ann Coulter says that the only people that are owed anything in america are black people. Im not denying the economical and psychological effects racism and slavery have had on black people for generations, but im not so sure the psychological effects of that racism still factors in as strongly in current generations 40 and under.

    This idea that young brothas across america who are killing each other, robbing each other, impregnating women out of wedlock and not taking care of their children, not going to college, not working, is not just them 🤬 up is a hard pill to swallow.

    I cant just keep spending my life defaulting back to racism to try to explain away everything while progressing forward in life. At the end of the day, stupid people exist, and stupid 🤬 happens. But sitting around waiting for someone to acknowledge my feelings isnt putting money in my bank account, because no black person in america is ever getting reparations in the form of a big fat check in your account.

    Im sure 🤬 Foster would agree with that statement, considering hard work got him to where he is, and continued hard work will allow him to help others get out of their situations too. Not sitting around crying about racism, which im sure had the least negative impact in his life, considering he grew up in a household of drug abuse and domestic violence like many of us.

    1) Slavery and Racism did and does most certainly affect the mental state of the man and woman in the black relationship.

    2) Black people are guinea pigs in this country. We don't control anything, and the way we act is reactionary to the situation they recreate for us. The game they play is to let a few get away so they will look down upon the ones that didn't. The reality of the situation is, if they want to ruin your life by tomorrow, they will do it. You're living behind enemy lines.

    3) Letting the world know that racism and slavery are still alive and affecting its victims has nothing to do with continuing to progress forward in life. It's actually easier to move forward, when you're aware of the obstacles in front of you.

    1) I didnt say slavery and racism did not have an effect on the mental state of black americans. I distinctly, and clearly said it does in the second paragraph. I question that the psychological effects of slavery and racism are still as applicable for current generations, or is it just that people want it to be, so they can take personal responsibility out of the equation of their lack of success in life.

    This isnt jim crow anymore. This isnt even the 80s or the 🤬 90s. At some point people have to take some personal responsibility. You cant sit here and tell me brothas are out here treating their women like 🤬 because of slavery, or jim crow laws.

    2) I dont know how you say that with a straight face, with a guy named barack hussain obama as president, with a chocolate sister for a wife that is adored by millions of white democrats. With black supreme court justices. Black mayors, governors, senators, chiefs of police all over the country. Black entertainers are some of the most popular people in this country. Millions of white people literally worship people like michael jordan, jackie robinson, rihanna, beyonce, ect...

    So if black people arent in complete dominant control of this already majority white country from top to bottom, we're just guinea pigs getting 🤬 ? What kind of reality is this? Youre speaking like this is 1919 right now, and not 2016 where kobe bryant didnt just start a 100 million dollar venture capital firm. Kobe bryant, a black man who was accused of 🤬 a white woman in the ass, is now one of the most popular athletes on the planet, adored by millions of americans, and is rich as 🤬 .

    For 🤬 sake, mike tyson went to prison for 🤬 , was a general violent 🤬 , and he was on ellen. MIKE TYSON WAS ON ELLEN! Son, lets jump into the 21st century here, B.


    3) I didnt say to stop letting the world know that racism still exist. Slavery doesnt exist in america unless youre arguing about the prison system.

    I clearly said, i cannot continue BLAMING everything on racism as i progress moving forward in life. I didnt say that i cant continue discussing racism, and point it out when it rears its ugly head. The fact that i spend my time typing paragraphs about incidences of racism in america here on this forum on a daily basis lets you know im still interested in it. Im just not interested in blaming every 🤬 thing on racism.




    Cmon son. I feel like im being fairly clear in my point making, and no matter how detailed, empathetic, rational, and logical a make my arguments, even when im actually on the same side as them, 🤬 just reply back with, nah, thats wrong, you wrong, my 3 sentence response is clearly right.

    giphy.gif
  • Vellum
    Vellum Members Posts: 471 ✭✭✭✭
    mryounggun wrote: »
    If you are upset at CK for this, it shows you really have NO understanding of the plight of the African American in this country. At all. Because if you did, even if you disagreed with him not standing...you'd understand it. Not mad at Cruz for his comments. They are actually the only types of comments that SHOULD be said by anyone who disagrees. He basically said 'You gotta respect the flag. But CK is a grown man and he can do what the 🤬 he wants. I PERSONALLY disagree, though.'.

    What's far more interesting to me is this broad:

    http://www.bizpacreview.com/2016/08/29/gold-star-mother-replies-kaepernicks-pathetic-actions-heart-exploding-blood-boiling-384479

    Not sure of this has been posted yet, but she's basically saying 'My son fought for the country. He died in Afghanistan for your right to be selfish, self-centered, arrogant, disrespectful, etc. Shame on you.'. If I'm CK, I actually reply to this one like, 'I appreciate your son's sacrifice. But let's not pretend African-American soldiers haven't been getting shot to 🤬 in every major theater of war since this country was founded, coming home and STILL running the risk of being murdered in the streets over a parking ticket or some 🤬 . Simmer down.'

    Military parents are so 🤬 entitled. Black men been dying in 🤬 war too. Dying in war, getting addicted to drugs in foreign countries, and coming back to a racist ass country that aint give a 🤬 about their contributions in war. 🤬 happens. Youre not entitled to everyone bending to your will and tears for the rest of your life.

    Black slaves died helping turn this country into an economic powerhouse. Black slave women 🤬 , giving birth to biracial children that were pitted against the darker slaves as a part of mental warfare. I dont see your tears for when the KKK stands on the land built on the backs of black slaves, and protest their racial superiority to us.

    Your son made a decision to sign up, and ship out just like many americans. Get your 🤬 life together, be proud of your child, proud of your country if you want, and respectful of those that feel that regardless of your childs death, work needs to still be done, and he will protest the national anthem until he feels that work is done.

    giphy.gif