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Mpc studio setup

Jsince90s
Jsince90s Paper ChaseLondon's DungeonMembers Posts: 180
edited September 2010 in Fresh Produce
Im gonna try make this as short as possible.

I have an akai remix 16 but want to get either the 2000 or 2000xl (whats your opinion on what to get coz im feelin the xl). But because the mpc is the most expensive thing on my list before hand i have to get

- Speakers
- Mixer
- Turntable for sampling


post up your recomendations on these items, i aint got a computer in my room where all this 🤬 would be so if i wanna store beats could i do that on a multitrack recorder and if so is recorder better than a mixer? coz i heard you can use the multitracks as mixers. I think you cant save a finished beat on the older mpcs, you can just save the sequences is that right?

Comments

  • Kang_Solomon_Grundy
    Kang_Solomon_Grundy KRACK SMOKIN' KANG on twitter flirtin' wit' yo' bitch!!!Members Posts: 2,005 ✭✭✭
    edited September 2010
    as far as the mpc's go, definately go with the 2000xl - stay FAR AWAY from the 2000 - trust me. on the real, for what you'd spend on an mpc, you could get a decent laptop/desktop and a pad controller; software/vst's are readily available and you can multi-track and save everything you make on your hard drive. you can throw in a basic mixer and speakers, or cop some "dre's" for mixing.
  • Roster Player #99
    Roster Player #99 Private The No Fly ZoneMembers Posts: 4,237 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 2010
    well as far as a turntable, if you catch your local music/electronics store on a good day, you can get them for cheap (I've seen as low as $50) but I use the Ion turntable still, been using since 06, its reliable, and depending on how careful you are, the cartridges can last a while, one that I suggest is the Numark CC-1, it ran me about $70 but has lasted and has traveled with me everywhere, with no needle changes. Headphones, I love these to death, I live in an apartment so I can get any monitors, but the Audio Technica ATH M50's are some dope ass joints, They're efficient and ran about $170. Never heard the Dre Beats but I aint knockn em. Basic midi's like the M Audio 49 key I believe are convenient for me, since I dont compose original joints that much, I use it for basslines and layering, but if you needed to play 🤬 out you could, most may say you need more keys than that, I disagree because of the ability of transposition.

    My crates....thats a different story...lol, but I'l like to say it almost weighs a ton....one place I started, other than some local record shops (Detroit has plenty), but dustygroove.com has a gang of 🤬 and their online selection is waaaaay better than their store. They have a tight dollar bin online too.
  • konceptjones
    konceptjones Guests, Members, Writer, Content Producer Posts: 13,139 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 2010
    as far as the mpc's go, definately go with the 2000xl - stay FAR AWAY from the 2000 - trust me. on the real, for what you'd spend on an mpc, you could get a decent laptop/desktop and a pad controller; software/vst's are readily available and you can multi-track and save everything you make on your hard drive. you can throw in a basic mixer and speakers, or cop some "dre's" for mixing.

    That depends on the person.

    Some people just don't want to use software and a desktop/laptop. I understand that fully, as I once had a fairly large hardware based rig myself. For those people, an MPC or something similar would be cool as the focal point of their recording rig.

    Now... to the question at hand:

    MPC:

    The main differences between the 2000 and 2000XL is that the 2000XL has time stretching, a flip up display, 300K note sequencer (vs 100K on the 2000), and you could get it with a Zip drive instead of a floppy. Oddly, they both sell for about the same amount on ebay.

    Speakers:

    You can get a decent set of active (powered) studio monitors for around $300. Alesis Monitor 1 Active MKII's, M-Audio Studiophile BX5a's, JBL LSR 2325P's (a bit more at $400 for a pair), and Yamaha MSP3's are a few to look at. The best thing to do, however, is to take some source material that either you mixed yourself or that is similar to the type of music you make down to a retailer and conduct some listening tests.

    Turntable:

    If all you're doing is sampling, then pretty much any decent turntable will do, just make sure you get a decent cartridge to go with it.