What's up everyone. We are doing a contest with T.I. and we are giving away $1200 a day for the next 10 days. Just wanted to give you all a heads up.
https://www.allhiphop.com/ti

So im going as Tupac for Halloween Peep the Costume and tell me if i resemble him.

MrJR
MrJR Members Posts: 5,904 ✭✭✭✭
edited November 2010 in AKA Donkey
Ok this is me and my friend Cj he's going as Biggie and me as Pac my cousin suppose to come a Puffy but he wasn't in time for the pic.Do you think i should get someone to be Sugar Knight?

Here's the pic
biggie-and-pac.jpg

Comments

  • MrJR
    MrJR Members Posts: 5,904 ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2010
    yo my friend Cj ugly as 🤬 lmao tonight gonna be GOAT
  • Bussy_Getta
    Bussy_Getta STFUMembers Posts: 37,679 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2010
    why haven't you been banned yet you 🤬
  • TheRicanKing
    TheRicanKing Members Posts: 2,351 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2010
    🤬 you more ugly than biggie haha
  • MrJR
    MrJR Members Posts: 5,904 ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2010
    🤬 dont get mad cause u aint a trick or a treat
  • Bussy_Getta
    Bussy_Getta STFUMembers Posts: 37,679 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2010
    damn sonned =-(
  • MrJR
    MrJR Members Posts: 5,904 ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2010
    im getting ready now to go out again tonight
  • shootemwon
    shootemwon Members Posts: 4,635 ✭✭
    edited October 2010
    Donkey is on it's way back to how it was in the olden days. With that said, threadstarter, leave right now, for your own good.
  • jonlakadeadmic
    jonlakadeadmic Members Posts: 4,735 ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2010
    as ive said before, threadstarter looks like the black doug funnie
  • BeleeDatPleighboy
    BeleeDatPleighboy Knockin em off they feet like a southerner supposed to do Members Posts: 8,461 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2010
    sboogie wrote: »
    you look like pico's 🤬 ....

    lol....well dayum....
  • MrJR
    MrJR Members Posts: 5,904 ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2010
    who moved this to donkey i posted in the reason
  • shootemwon
    shootemwon Members Posts: 4,635 ✭✭
    edited October 2010
    MrJR wrote: »
    who moved this to donkey i posted in the reason

    Old habits die hard. The mod staff here has always had a habit of moving garbage threads made by retards to donkey.
  • MrJR
    MrJR Members Posts: 5,904 ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2010
    oh well they could lock this 🤬 it flopped anyway
  • Bussy_Getta
    Bussy_Getta STFUMembers Posts: 37,679 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2010
    sboogie wrote: »
    you look like pico's 🤬 ....

    thats a good look tho bruh
  • Wishbone Jones
    Wishbone Jones Members Posts: 4,296 ✭✭✭
    edited November 2010
    posts becuase i have the 🤬 to do it
  • birdcall89
    birdcall89 Members Posts: 6,009 ✭✭✭
    edited November 2010
    you need a couple bullet holes
  • TazManianRebel
    TazManianRebel Members Posts: 421
    edited November 2010
  • DaFifthElement
    DaFifthElement Members Posts: 4,764 ✭✭✭
    edited November 2010
    shootemwon wrote: »
    Old habits die hard. The mod staff here has always had a habit of moving garbage threads made by retards to donkey.

    i laffed..
  • alvarez_313
    alvarez_313 Members Posts: 1,322 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2010
    Did this 🤬 really say SUGAR Knight? Damn Bahamas losin on this one
  • b@squ1@t redux
    [email protected]@t redux i can tell by your mustache youve never been involved in street activities iguana blood poseidon DNA slangin zeus dickMembers Posts: 13,035 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2010
    Origin
    The date of composition of the Metamorphoses is uncertain. It has variously been considered by scholars as a youthful work preceding Apuleius' Apology of 158/9 AD, or as the 🤬 of his literary career and perhaps as late as the 170s or 180s.[5] Apuleius adapted the story from a Greek original of which the author's name is said to be Lucius of Patrae (the name of the lead character and narrator). This Greek text has been lost, but there is Λούκιος ἢ ὄνος (Loúkios è ónos, Loukios/Lucius or the Ass), a similar tale of disputed authorship. This surviving Greek text is possibly an abridgement or epitome of "Lucius of Patrae's" text, attributed to Lucian of Samosata, a contemporary of Apuleius. Possibly the original lost story was written by Lucian and only an abriged version was transmitted under his name.

    [edit] Plot
    Book One

    The prologue establishes an audience and a speaker, who defines himself by location, education, and occupation. The narrator journeys to Thessaly on business. On the way, he runs into Aristomenes and an unnamed traveler. The unnamed traveler refuses to believe Aristomenes’ story. The narrator scolds the unnamed traveler and tells a short story about a sword swallower. He promises Aristomenes a free lunch if he will retell his tale. The narrator believes Aristomenes’ tale and becomes more eager to learn about magic. The narrator arrives at Hypata, where he stays with Milo, a family friend and miser, and his wife Pamphile. Photis, Milo’s servant, takes the narrator to the baths, after which the narrator goes to the marketplace. There, he buys some fish and runs into his old friend Pytheas, who is now a magistrate. Pytheas reveals the narrator’s name as Lucius. Pytheas says that Lucius overpaid for the fish and humiliates the fish-monger by trampling on the fish. Lucius returns to Milo’s house, hungry and empty-handed. Milo asks Lucius about his life, his friends, and his wanderings. Lucius goes to sleep hungry.

    Book Two


    The next morning, Lucius meets his aunt Byrrhena in the town, and she warns him that Milo's wife is an evil witch who will 🤬 Lucius. Lucius, however, is interested in becoming a witch himself. He then returns to Milo's house, where he repeatedly makes love to the slave-girl Fotis (also spelled Photis[6]). The next day, Lucius goes to his aunt's home for dinner, and there meets Thelyphron, who relates the his tale of how witches cut off his nose and ears. After the meal, Lucius drunkenly returns to Milo's house in the dark, where he encounters three robbers, whom he soon slays before retiring to bed.

    Book Three


    Lucius spies Milo's wife transforming into a bird, as illustrated by Jean de Bosschère.The next morning, Lucius is abruptly awoken and arrested for the murder of the three men. He is taken to court where he is laughed at constantly and witnesses are brought against him. They are just about to announce his guilt when the widow demands to bring out the dead bodies; but when the three bodies of the murdered men are revealed, they have miraculously transformed into puffed-up wineskins. It then turns out that it was a prank played by the town upon Lucius. Later that day, Lucius and Photis watch Milo's wife perform her witchcraft and transform herself into a bird. Attempting to copy her, Lucius accidentally turns himself into an ass, at which point Photis tells him that the only way for him to return to his human state is to eat a rose.

    Book Four

    Lucius the ass trots over to a garden to munch on a rose when he is beaten by the gardener and chased by dogs. He is then stolen from Milo's house by thieves, who talk about how their leader Thrasileon has been killed while dressed as a bear. The thieves then kidnap a young woman, Charites, who is housed in a cave with Lucius the ass. Charites starts crying, so an elderly woman who is in league with the thieves begins to tell her the story of Cupid and Psyche. The elderly woman continues telling the story of Cupid and Psyche. Psyche is the most beautiful woman on earth, and Venus jealously arranges for Psyche's destruction.

    Book Five

    Cupid, Venus's son, secretly preserves Psyche; Cupid becomes Psyche's anonymous lover. Psyche's jealous sisters arouse her curiosity and fear; Psyche, against Cupid's commands, looks at him; Cupid abandons Psyche, who wanders in search of him.

    Book Six

    The elderly woman finishes telling the story of Cupid and Psyche. Lucius the ass and Charites escape from the cave but they are caught by the thieves, and sentenced to death.


    Charitë embraces Tlepolemus while Lucius looks on. From an Illustration by Jean de BosschèreBook Seven

    A man appears to the thieves and announces that he is the renowned thief Haemus the Thracian, who suggests that they should not 🤬 the captives but sell them. Haemus later reveals himself secretly to Charites as her fiancé Tlepolemus, and gets all of the thieves 🤬 . When they are asleep he slays them all. Tlepolemus, Charites and Lucius the ass safely escape back to the town. Once there, the ass is entrusted to a horrid boy who torments him but the boy is later killed by a bear. Enraged, the boy's mother plans to 🤬 the ass.

    Book Eight

    A man arrives at the mother's house and announces that Tlepolemus and Charites are dead, caused by the scheming of the evil Thrasillus who wants Charites to marry him. After hearing the news of their master's death, the slaves run away, taking the ass Lucius with them. The large group of traveling slaves is mistaken for a band of robbers and attacked by farmhands of a rich estate. Several other misfortunes befall the travelers until they reach a village. Lucius as the narrator often digresses from the plot in order to recount several scandal-filled stories that he learns of during his journey. Lucius is eventually sold to a catamite priest. He is entrusted with carrying the statue of a goddess on his back while he follows around the group of sinful priests. While engaging in lewd activity with a local boy, the group of priests is discovered by a man in search of a stolen ass who mistakes Lucius' braying for that of his own animal. The priests flee to a new city where they are well received by one of its chief citizens. They are preparing to dine when his cook realizes that the meat that was to be served was stolen by a dog. The cook, at the suggestion of his wife, prepares to 🤬 Lucius in order to serve his meat instead.


    Lucius encounters the murderous wife, as illustrated by Jean de Bosschère.Book Nine

    Lucius' untimely escape from the cook coincides with an attack by rabid dogs, and his wild behavior is attributed to their viral bites. The men barricade him in a room until it is decided that he is no longer infected. The band of priests packs up and moves out. The narrative is interrupted by The Tale of the Wife's Tub. After the arrest of the priests Lucius is sold into labor, driving a baker's mill-wheel. Lucius, though bemoaning his labor as an ass, also realizes that this state has allowed him to hear many novel things with his long ass-ears. The Tale of the Jealous Husband and The Tale of the Fuller's Wife mark a break in the narrative. The theme of the two intervening stories is adultery, and the text appropriately follows with the adultery of the baker's wife and the subsequent murder of the baker. Lucius the ass is then auctioned off to a farmer. The Tale of the Oppressive Landlord is here told. The farmer duly assaults a legionary who makes advances on his ass (Lucius), but he is found out and jailed.


    Lucius is returned to human form during the procession of Isis. From an Illustration by Jean de BosschèreBook Ten

    Lucius comes into the legionary's possession, and after lodging with a decurion Lucius recounts Tale of the Murderous Wife. He is then sold to two brothers, a confectioner and a cook, who treated him kindly. When they would go out Lucius would secretly eat his fill of their food. At first a source of vexation, when the ass was discovered to be the one behind the disappearing food it was much laughed at and celebrated. Again he was sold, and he was taught many amusing tricks. Rumor spread, and great fame came to the ass and his master. As it happened, a woman was so enamored of the sideshow ass that she paid off his keeper and took him to bed with her. The Tale of the Jealous Wife is aired. The murderess depicted in this tale is precisely she whom Lucius is made to mate with at the Shows. After an enactment of the judgment of Paris and a brief but important digression, the time comes for Lucius to make his much awaited appearance. At the last moment he decides against this, fearing for his life, and he runs away to Cenchreae eventually to nap on the beach.
  • jonlakadeadmic
    jonlakadeadmic Members Posts: 4,735 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2010
    Origin
    The date of composition of the Metamorphoses is uncertain. It has variously been considered by scholars as a youthful work preceding Apuleius' Apology of 158/9 AD, or as the 🤬 of his literary career and perhaps as late as the 170s or 180s.[5] Apuleius adapted the story from a Greek original of which the author's name is said to be Lucius of Patrae (the name of the lead character and narrator). This Greek text has been lost, but there is Λούκιος ἢ ὄνος (Loúkios è ónos, Loukios/Lucius or the Ass), a similar tale of disputed authorship. This surviving Greek text is possibly an abridgement or epitome of "Lucius of Patrae's" text, attributed to Lucian of Samosata, a contemporary of Apuleius. Possibly the original lost story was written by Lucian and only an abriged version was transmitted under his name.

    [edit] Plot
    Book One

    The prologue establishes an audience and a speaker, who defines himself by location, education, and occupation. The narrator journeys to Thessaly on business. On the way, he runs into Aristomenes and an unnamed traveler. The unnamed traveler refuses to believe Aristomenes’ story. The narrator scolds the unnamed traveler and tells a short story about a sword swallower. He promises Aristomenes a free lunch if he will retell his tale. The narrator believes Aristomenes’ tale and becomes more eager to learn about magic. The narrator arrives at Hypata, where he stays with Milo, a family friend and miser, and his wife Pamphile. Photis, Milo’s servant, takes the narrator to the baths, after which the narrator goes to the marketplace. There, he buys some fish and runs into his old friend Pytheas, who is now a magistrate. Pytheas reveals the narrator’s name as Lucius. Pytheas says that Lucius overpaid for the fish and humiliates the fish-monger by trampling on the fish. Lucius returns to Milo’s house, hungry and empty-handed. Milo asks Lucius about his life, his friends, and his wanderings. Lucius goes to sleep hungry.

    Book Two


    The next morning, Lucius meets his aunt Byrrhena in the town, and she warns him that Milo's wife is an evil witch who will 🤬 Lucius. Lucius, however, is interested in becoming a witch himself. He then returns to Milo's house, where he repeatedly makes love to the slave-girl Fotis (also spelled Photis[6]). The next day, Lucius goes to his aunt's home for dinner, and there meets Thelyphron, who relates the his tale of how witches cut off his nose and ears. After the meal, Lucius drunkenly returns to Milo's house in the dark, where he encounters three robbers, whom he soon slays before retiring to bed.

    Book Three


    Lucius spies Milo's wife transforming into a bird, as illustrated by Jean de Bosschère.The next morning, Lucius is abruptly awoken and arrested for the murder of the three men. He is taken to court where he is laughed at constantly and witnesses are brought against him. They are just about to announce his guilt when the widow demands to bring out the dead bodies; but when the three bodies of the murdered men are revealed, they have miraculously transformed into puffed-up wineskins. It then turns out that it was a prank played by the town upon Lucius. Later that day, Lucius and Photis watch Milo's wife perform her witchcraft and transform herself into a bird. Attempting to copy her, Lucius accidentally turns himself into an ass, at which point Photis tells him that the only way for him to return to his human state is to eat a rose.

    Book Four

    Lucius the ass trots over to a garden to munch on a rose when he is beaten by the gardener and chased by dogs. He is then stolen from Milo's house by thieves, who talk about how their leader Thrasileon has been killed while dressed as a bear. The thieves then kidnap a young woman, Charites, who is housed in a cave with Lucius the ass. Charites starts crying, so an elderly woman who is in league with the thieves begins to tell her the story of Cupid and Psyche. The elderly woman continues telling the story of Cupid and Psyche. Psyche is the most beautiful woman on earth, and Venus jealously arranges for Psyche's destruction.

    Book Five

    Cupid, Venus's son, secretly preserves Psyche; Cupid becomes Psyche's anonymous lover. Psyche's jealous sisters arouse her curiosity and fear; Psyche, against Cupid's commands, looks at him; Cupid abandons Psyche, who wanders in search of him.

    Book Six

    The elderly woman finishes telling the story of Cupid and Psyche. Lucius the ass and Charites escape from the cave but they are caught by the thieves, and sentenced to death.


    Charitë embraces Tlepolemus while Lucius looks on. From an Illustration by Jean de BosschèreBook Seven

    A man appears to the thieves and announces that he is the renowned thief Haemus the Thracian, who suggests that they should not 🤬 the captives but sell them. Haemus later reveals himself secretly to Charites as her fiancé Tlepolemus, and gets all of the thieves 🤬 . When they are asleep he slays them all. Tlepolemus, Charites and Lucius the ass safely escape back to the town. Once there, the ass is entrusted to a horrid boy who torments him but the boy is later killed by a bear. Enraged, the boy's mother plans to 🤬 the ass.

    Book Eight

    A man arrives at the mother's house and announces that Tlepolemus and Charites are dead, caused by the scheming of the evil Thrasillus who wants Charites to marry him. After hearing the news of their master's death, the slaves run away, taking the ass Lucius with them. The large group of traveling slaves is mistaken for a band of robbers and attacked by farmhands of a rich estate. Several other misfortunes befall the travelers until they reach a village. Lucius as the narrator often digresses from the plot in order to recount several scandal-filled stories that he learns of during his journey. Lucius is eventually sold to a catamite priest. He is entrusted with carrying the statue of a goddess on his back while he follows around the group of sinful priests. While engaging in lewd activity with a local boy, the group of priests is discovered by a man in search of a stolen ass who mistakes Lucius' braying for that of his own animal. The priests flee to a new city where they are well received by one of its chief citizens. They are preparing to dine when his cook realizes that the meat that was to be served was stolen by a dog. The cook, at the suggestion of his wife, prepares to 🤬 Lucius in order to serve his meat instead.


    Lucius encounters the murderous wife, as illustrated by Jean de Bosschère.Book Nine

    Lucius' untimely escape from the cook coincides with an attack by rabid dogs, and his wild behavior is attributed to their viral bites. The men barricade him in a room until it is decided that he is no longer infected. The band of priests packs up and moves out. The narrative is interrupted by The Tale of the Wife's Tub. After the arrest of the priests Lucius is sold into labor, driving a baker's mill-wheel. Lucius, though bemoaning his labor as an ass, also realizes that this state has allowed him to hear many novel things with his long ass-ears. The Tale of the Jealous Husband and The Tale of the Fuller's Wife mark a break in the narrative. The theme of the two intervening stories is adultery, and the text appropriately follows with the adultery of the baker's wife and the subsequent murder of the baker. Lucius the ass is then auctioned off to a farmer. The Tale of the Oppressive Landlord is here told. The farmer duly assaults a legionary who makes advances on his ass (Lucius), but he is found out and jailed.


    Lucius is returned to human form during the procession of Isis. From an Illustration by Jean de BosschèreBook Ten

    Lucius comes into the legionary's possession, and after lodging with a decurion Lucius recounts Tale of the Murderous Wife. He is then sold to two brothers, a confectioner and a cook, who treated him kindly. When they would go out Lucius would secretly eat his fill of their food. At first a source of vexation, when the ass was discovered to be the one behind the disappearing food it was much laughed at and celebrated. Again he was sold, and he was taught many amusing tricks. Rumor spread, and great fame came to the ass and his master. As it happened, a woman was so enamored of the sideshow ass that she paid off his keeper and took him to bed with her. The Tale of the Jealous Wife is aired. The murderess depicted in this tale is precisely she whom Lucius is made to mate with at the Shows. After an enactment of the judgment of Paris and a brief but important digression, the time comes for Lucius to make his much awaited appearance. At the last moment he decides against this, fearing for his life, and he runs away to Cenchreae eventually to nap on the beach.

    word???????
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