What's up everyone. We are doing a contest with T.I. and we are giving away $1200 a day for the next 10 days. Just wanted to give you all a heads up.
https://www.allhiphop.com/ti

Recording Studio Internships?

silverfoxx
silverfoxx SionGuests, Members, Writer, Content Producer Posts: 11,704 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited September 2017 in The Reason
Heavily considering some, but I lack the proper knowledge on which one to pursue. I'm sure some posters on the IC have done it, or is aware where which studio's would be a great opportunity to learn and network with. I'm currently in Atlanta so any help is muchly needed. If anyone wants to DM me for respect of the privacy of a networking opportunity, understand I'm very interested. Paid internships is certainly ideal since the commute will be far, but I'm willing to make things work.

Thanks IC!
«1

Comments

  • silverfoxx
    silverfoxx Sion Guests, Members, Writer, Content Producer Posts: 11,704 ✭✭✭✭✭
  • LcnsdbyROYALTY
    LcnsdbyROYALTY King of Myself Members Posts: 13,763 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Man, Jack White's Third Man Records is in tha Ville. I slick wanna go see if I can intern there.
  • Stiff
    Stiff Legion of Trill BG Members Posts: 7,723 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I stepped away from all that. Sorry I can't help good luck tho.
  • silverfoxx
    silverfoxx Sion Guests, Members, Writer, Content Producer Posts: 11,704 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Stiff wrote: »
    I stepped away from all that. Sorry I can't help good luck tho.

    I understand man
  • CeLLaR-DooR
    CeLLaR-DooR Members Posts: 18,880 ✭✭✭✭✭
    bkkbully wrote: »
    I did two audio internships while I was in university, each lasting for a year and a half. The first internship was for a digital media studio and gallery space in NYC which included doing udio production for film, sound installation for art exhibitions, setting up mics at press conferences, micing interviewers and interviewees, making music for radio introductions - basically a crash course in all things audio. It blew my mind because I was coming from a music studio perspective, but opened my eyes to how many jobs there are involving audio.

    The second internship was a no frills, Grammy award winning studio filled to the brim with experience and knowledge in all things for engineering music. Platinum engineers, producers, and artists from all genres rolled through, but mostly hip hop and R&B. I was able to listen, watch, and experience the creation of several dope albums, with a few Grammy winning singles. and then hear them on the radio four months later. We had to learn several Neve and SSL boards, and set up session for high end clients, and if you were dope you would be in the session running the patchbay.

    These type of internships are extremely valuable. In my case, I learned to use a wide range of audio gear with the quickness, know which microphones are best for the environment, and became used to being competitive among the tier of professionals. You figure out which kind of sound engineer you want to be. I originally wanted to be a sound engineer for music, but went to university for sound design for film, and now I'm overseas working as sound engineer for tech firms and starting my own digital media imprint at the end of the year.

    Be ready to work your ass off. This isn't an easy career path. Use your internships to be a better engineer and most importantly, a better communicator. Keep your (ears) eyes open and stay with the pace of the game, it moves fast but if you're smart and realise that audio is used for almost everything - you'll always have a job. Let me know if I can help with anything.

    🤬 that's GOAT man
  • Stew
    Stew Rap Music Is My Religion HTTRMembers, Moderators, Writer Posts: 52,234 Regulator
    My homeboy went to the Art Institute here in the A, he graduated, got an internship with Dallas Austin. They had him chasing coffee and donuts, he bounced, works 40 hrs behind a desk now. End of story.
  • spit_fiya
    spit_fiya Members Posts: 2,531 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Bad Boy and Rocafella use to have internships...not sure if that's still going on though.
  • T. Sanford
    T. Sanford Trill Doggy Dogg (Legion Of Trill) Guests, Members, Writer, Content Producer Posts: 25,291 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Stew wrote: »
    My homeboy went to the Art Institute here in the A, he graduated, got an internship with Dallas Austin. They had him chasing coffee and donuts, he bounced, works 40 hrs behind a desk now. End of story.

    Lmao damn that's messed up
  • Roster Player #99
    Roster Player #99 Members Posts: 4,237 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Studio internships ain't really a thing anymore. If they do recruit it's either from a reputable school or from knowing people. Try radio first. Maybe even live audio. Large studios offering internships are slowly dying.
  • Peezy_Jenkins
    Peezy_Jenkins Sion Guests, Members, Writer, Content Producer Posts: 33,205 ✭✭✭✭✭
  • silverfoxx
    silverfoxx Sion Guests, Members, Writer, Content Producer Posts: 11,704 ✭✭✭✭✭
    bkkbully wrote: »
    I did two audio internships while I was in university, each lasting for a year and a half. The first internship was for a digital media studio and gallery space in NYC which included doing udio production for film, sound installation for art exhibitions, setting up mics at press conferences, micing interviewers and interviewees, making music for radio introductions - basically a crash course in all things audio. It blew my mind because I was coming from a music studio perspective, but opened my eyes to how many jobs there are involving audio.

    The second internship was a no frills, Grammy award winning studio filled to the brim with experience and knowledge in all things for engineering music. Platinum engineers, producers, and artists from all genres rolled through, but mostly hip hop and R&B. I was able to listen, watch, and experience the creation of several dope albums, with a few Grammy winning singles. and then hear them on the radio four months later. We had to learn several Neve and SSL boards, and set up session for high end clients, and if you were dope you would be in the session running the patchbay.

    These type of internships are extremely valuable. In my case, I learned to use a wide range of audio gear with the quickness, know which microphones are best for the environment, and became used to being competitive among the tier of professionals. You figure out which kind of sound engineer you want to be. I originally wanted to be a sound engineer for music, but went to university for sound design for film, and now I'm overseas working as sound engineer for tech firms and starting my own digital media imprint at the end of the year.

    Be ready to work your ass off. This isn't an easy career path. Use your internships to be a better engineer and most importantly, a better communicator. Keep your (ears) eyes open and stay with the pace of the game, it moves fast but if you're smart and realise that audio is used for almost everything - you'll always have a job. Let me know if I can help with anything.

    Alot of jewels brother thank you. From my perspective, I'm currently interested for the networking opportunities. I'm also a music producer, so sound engineering is not much of a strength of mines. However, I'm willing to learn more about it, although folks have a clear cut vision and path strictly for sound engineering, paying massive amounts of money for audio schools so I feel like in that field I would be disadvantaged.
  • bkkbully
    bkkbully around the wayMembers Posts: 2,221 ✭✭✭✭✭
    silverfoxx wrote: »
    bkkbully wrote: »
    I did two audio internships while I was in university, each lasting for a year and a half. The first internship was for a digital media studio and gallery space in NYC which included doing udio production for film, sound installation for art exhibitions, setting up mics at press conferences, micing interviewers and interviewees, making music for radio introductions - basically a crash course in all things audio. It blew my mind because I was coming from a music studio perspective, but opened my eyes to how many jobs there are involving audio.

    The second internship was a no frills, Grammy award winning studio filled to the brim with experience and knowledge in all things for engineering music. Platinum engineers, producers, and artists from all genres rolled through, but mostly hip hop and R&B. I was able to listen, watch, and experience the creation of several dope albums, with a few Grammy winning singles. and then hear them on the radio four months later. We had to learn several Neve and SSL boards, and set up session for high end clients, and if you were dope you would be in the session running the patchbay.

    These type of internships are extremely valuable. In my case, I learned to use a wide range of audio gear with the quickness, know which microphones are best for the environment, and became used to being competitive among the tier of professionals. You figure out which kind of sound engineer you want to be. I originally wanted to be a sound engineer for music, but went to university for sound design for film, and now I'm overseas working as sound engineer for tech firms and starting my own digital media imprint at the end of the year.

    Be ready to work your ass off. This isn't an easy career path. Use your internships to be a better engineer and most importantly, a better communicator. Keep your (ears) eyes open and stay with the pace of the game, it moves fast but if you're smart and realise that audio is used for almost everything - you'll always have a job. Let me know if I can help with anything.

    Alot of jewels brother thank you. From my perspective, I'm currently interested for the networking opportunities. I'm also a music producer, so sound engineering is not much of a strength of mines. However, I'm willing to learn more about it, although folks have a clear cut vision and path strictly for sound engineering, paying massive amounts of money for audio schools so I feel like in that field I would be disadvantaged.

    Be careful with this, this is looked down upon in professional studios. There are tons of people who try to do music production from a sound engineering internship and get kicked out because chief engineers can see through it all. You can get blackballed from doing this because people will not take you serious. If you are going to do an engineering internship, you will strictly be doing engineering. Not production. There are very clear defined lines between the two once you get into higher levels of the game.
    Stew wrote: »
    My homeboy went to the Art Institute here in the A, he graduated, got an internship with Dallas Austin. They had him chasing coffee and donuts, he bounced, works 40 hrs behind a desk now. End of story.

    Yes, this is regular in big studios. This is a test. It's the seeding process. You will see who really wants this life and who doesn't very quickly. Your ego will eat at you. But the thought of reasoning behind this is - if you can't even get clients the right coffee, donut, and food orders - how can we trust you to run a session? There are literally no shortcuts in this profession. It's a tough life until you break through.
  • silverfoxx
    silverfoxx Sion Guests, Members, Writer, Content Producer Posts: 11,704 ✭✭✭✭✭
    bkkbully wrote: »
    silverfoxx wrote: »
    bkkbully wrote: »
    I did two audio internships while I was in university, each lasting for a year and a half. The first internship was for a digital media studio and gallery space in NYC which included doing udio production for film, sound installation for art exhibitions, setting up mics at press conferences, micing interviewers and interviewees, making music for radio introductions - basically a crash course in all things audio. It blew my mind because I was coming from a music studio perspective, but opened my eyes to how many jobs there are involving audio.

    The second internship was a no frills, Grammy award winning studio filled to the brim with experience and knowledge in all things for engineering music. Platinum engineers, producers, and artists from all genres rolled through, but mostly hip hop and R&B. I was able to listen, watch, and experience the creation of several dope albums, with a few Grammy winning singles. and then hear them on the radio four months later. We had to learn several Neve and SSL boards, and set up session for high end clients, and if you were dope you would be in the session running the patchbay.

    These type of internships are extremely valuable. In my case, I learned to use a wide range of audio gear with the quickness, know which microphones are best for the environment, and became used to being competitive among the tier of professionals. You figure out which kind of sound engineer you want to be. I originally wanted to be a sound engineer for music, but went to university for sound design for film, and now I'm overseas working as sound engineer for tech firms and starting my own digital media imprint at the end of the year.

    Be ready to work your ass off. This isn't an easy career path. Use your internships to be a better engineer and most importantly, a better communicator. Keep your (ears) eyes open and stay with the pace of the game, it moves fast but if you're smart and realise that audio is used for almost everything - you'll always have a job. Let me know if I can help with anything.

    Alot of jewels brother thank you. From my perspective, I'm currently interested for the networking opportunities. I'm also a music producer, so sound engineering is not much of a strength of mines. However, I'm willing to learn more about it, although folks have a clear cut vision and path strictly for sound engineering, paying massive amounts of money for audio schools so I feel like in that field I would be disadvantaged.

    Be careful with this, this is looked down upon in professional studios. There are tons of people who try to do music production from a sound engineering internship and get kicked out because chief engineers can see through it all. You can get blackballed from doing this because people will not take you serious. If you are going to do an engineering internship, you will strictly be doing engineering. Not production. There are very clear defined lines between the two once you get into higher levels of the game.
    Stew wrote: »
    My homeboy went to the Art Institute here in the A, he graduated, got an internship with Dallas Austin. They had him chasing coffee and donuts, he bounced, works 40 hrs behind a desk now. End of story.

    Yes, this is regular in big studios. This is a test. It's the seeding process. You will see who really wants this life and who doesn't very quickly. Your ego will eat at you. But the thought of reasoning behind this is - if you can't even get clients the right coffee, donut, and food orders - how can we trust you to run a session? There are literally no shortcuts in this profession. It's a tough life until you break through.

    So what's the outlet for music production? Why are people forced to strictly do sound engineering when both paths are completely different? Btw I appreciate you for informing me the expectations of folks within the studios.
  • Stew
    Stew Rap Music Is My Religion HTTRMembers, Moderators, Writer Posts: 52,234 Regulator
    bkkbully wrote: »
    silverfoxx wrote: »
    bkkbully wrote: »
    I did two audio internships while I was in university, each lasting for a year and a half. The first internship was for a digital media studio and gallery space in NYC which included doing udio production for film, sound installation for art exhibitions, setting up mics at press conferences, micing interviewers and interviewees, making music for radio introductions - basically a crash course in all things audio. It blew my mind because I was coming from a music studio perspective, but opened my eyes to how many jobs there are involving audio.

    The second internship was a no frills, Grammy award winning studio filled to the brim with experience and knowledge in all things for engineering music. Platinum engineers, producers, and artists from all genres rolled through, but mostly hip hop and R&B. I was able to listen, watch, and experience the creation of several dope albums, with a few Grammy winning singles. and then hear them on the radio four months later. We had to learn several Neve and SSL boards, and set up session for high end clients, and if you were dope you would be in the session running the patchbay.

    These type of internships are extremely valuable. In my case, I learned to use a wide range of audio gear with the quickness, know which microphones are best for the environment, and became used to being competitive among the tier of professionals. You figure out which kind of sound engineer you want to be. I originally wanted to be a sound engineer for music, but went to university for sound design for film, and now I'm overseas working as sound engineer for tech firms and starting my own digital media imprint at the end of the year.

    Be ready to work your ass off. This isn't an easy career path. Use your internships to be a better engineer and most importantly, a better communicator. Keep your (ears) eyes open and stay with the pace of the game, it moves fast but if you're smart and realise that audio is used for almost everything - you'll always have a job. Let me know if I can help with anything.

    Alot of jewels brother thank you. From my perspective, I'm currently interested for the networking opportunities. I'm also a music producer, so sound engineering is not much of a strength of mines. However, I'm willing to learn more about it, although folks have a clear cut vision and path strictly for sound engineering, paying massive amounts of money for audio schools so I feel like in that field I would be disadvantaged.

    Be careful with this, this is looked down upon in professional studios. There are tons of people who try to do music production from a sound engineering internship and get kicked out because chief engineers can see through it all. You can get blackballed from doing this because people will not take you serious. If you are going to do an engineering internship, you will strictly be doing engineering. Not production. There are very clear defined lines between the two once you get into higher levels of the game.
    Stew wrote: »
    My homeboy went to the Art Institute here in the A, he graduated, got an internship with Dallas Austin. They had him chasing coffee and donuts, he bounced, works 40 hrs behind a desk now. End of story.

    Yes, this is regular in big studios. This is a test. It's the seeding process. You will see who really wants this life and who doesn't very quickly. Your ego will eat at you. But the thought of reasoning behind this is - if you can't even get clients the right coffee, donut, and food orders - how can we trust you to run a session? There are literally no shortcuts in this profession. It's a tough life until you break through.

    Yea I told him about that but he wasn't exactly in the position to be waitin around on 🤬 , needed the money so I understood.
  • JonnyRoccIT
    JonnyRoccIT . . . Player Shit ONLY . ZONE 6 Atlanta, GAMembers Posts: 14,389 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Yeah, i went to the Art Institute of Atlanta for about a Year. Dope environment being around so many creative individuals but also so many people were there for the wrong reasons.

    If you produce, I strongly recommend you learn Engineering also. You enhance your production and open more doors for yourself...

    You also realize how many jobs and 🤬 you can do that Involves Audio...i was a Boom operator, a Foley Artist, and producing while in school.

    That Foley artist 🤬 was actually fun as hell...i never even realized that was a Job to find and manipulate random objects to replicate sounds until i went there.
    Also this is Atlanta, you gotta NETWORK your ass off...everything you could possibly want is here. It's the biggest Music and newly Film industry in the country now. It's a lot of opportunities and people that know people. But also a lot of Competition
  • FlightKing
    FlightKing Members Posts: 1,921 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @silverfoxx What's the point of interning at a recording studio if you're a producer? Why not just put some beats on artists and ask to go in the studio with them? That interning brings a level of responsibility you probably don't have time for if you're trying to be a producer that networks. This sounds like you're trying to be a networker that produces.
  • bkkbully
    bkkbully around the wayMembers Posts: 2,221 ✭✭✭✭✭
    silverfoxx wrote: »
    bkkbully wrote: »
    silverfoxx wrote: »
    bkkbully wrote: »
    I did two audio internships while I was in university, each lasting for a year and a half. The first internship was for a digital media studio and gallery space in NYC which included doing udio production for film, sound installation for art exhibitions, setting up mics at press conferences, micing interviewers and interviewees, making music for radio introductions - basically a crash course in all things audio. It blew my mind because I was coming from a music studio perspective, but opened my eyes to how many jobs there are involving audio.

    The second internship was a no frills, Grammy award winning studio filled to the brim with experience and knowledge in all things for engineering music. Platinum engineers, producers, and artists from all genres rolled through, but mostly hip hop and R&B. I was able to listen, watch, and experience the creation of several dope albums, with a few Grammy winning singles. and then hear them on the radio four months later. We had to learn several Neve and SSL boards, and set up session for high end clients, and if you were dope you would be in the session running the patchbay.

    These type of internships are extremely valuable. In my case, I learned to use a wide range of audio gear with the quickness, know which microphones are best for the environment, and became used to being competitive among the tier of professionals. You figure out which kind of sound engineer you want to be. I originally wanted to be a sound engineer for music, but went to university for sound design for film, and now I'm overseas working as sound engineer for tech firms and starting my own digital media imprint at the end of the year.

    Be ready to work your ass off. This isn't an easy career path. Use your internships to be a better engineer and most importantly, a better communicator. Keep your (ears) eyes open and stay with the pace of the game, it moves fast but if you're smart and realise that audio is used for almost everything - you'll always have a job. Let me know if I can help with anything.

    Alot of jewels brother thank you. From my perspective, I'm currently interested for the networking opportunities. I'm also a music producer, so sound engineering is not much of a strength of mines. However, I'm willing to learn more about it, although folks have a clear cut vision and path strictly for sound engineering, paying massive amounts of money for audio schools so I feel like in that field I would be disadvantaged.

    Be careful with this, this is looked down upon in professional studios. There are tons of people who try to do music production from a sound engineering internship and get kicked out because chief engineers can see through it all. You can get blackballed from doing this because people will not take you serious. If you are going to do an engineering internship, you will strictly be doing engineering. Not production. There are very clear defined lines between the two once you get into higher levels of the game.
    Stew wrote: »
    My homeboy went to the Art Institute here in the A, he graduated, got an internship with Dallas Austin. They had him chasing coffee and donuts, he bounced, works 40 hrs behind a desk now. End of story.

    Yes, this is regular in big studios. This is a test. It's the seeding process. You will see who really wants this life and who doesn't very quickly. Your ego will eat at you. But the thought of reasoning behind this is - if you can't even get clients the right coffee, donut, and food orders - how can we trust you to run a session? There are literally no shortcuts in this profession. It's a tough life until you break through.

    So what's the outlet for music production? Why are people forced to strictly do sound engineering when both paths are completely different? Btw I appreciate you for informing me the expectations of folks within the studios.

    No one is forced to strictly sound engineering, these internships are for people who want to be only sound engineers. If you want to be a music producer than a sound engineering internship might not be the best thing for you. Very rarely does a true engineer cross over to a producer - stories like Just Blaze's are an exception not the norm. You don't need top sound engineering skills to be a great producer, you need to know how to network your ass off and have flames coming off your tracks. It's much easier to build with a few artists that you believe in, produce for them, and network like crazy and build your own wave. Your work ethic and your relationships will get you to the level you want to be at.

    Music production is more akin to entrepreneurship, whereas engineering is more a "stable" route. Both are incredibly challenging and competitive.

    You should look into composing internships and beat workshops - where you can shadow producers and composers making music for all kinds of different media. That might help you more than just going into sound engineering.

    Now a days they have these online MasterClasses with Hans Zimmer, DeadMau5, Herbie Hancock, and tons of other producers. You don't need an internship, you just need hustle and outside the box thinking. Let me talk to a few colleagues and see if I can find any resources for you.
  • DarthRozay
    DarthRozay Members Posts: 20,570 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @bkkbully how're you working for tech firms an an audio engineer? like what're you doing?
  • bkkbully
    bkkbully around the wayMembers Posts: 2,221 ✭✭✭✭✭
    DarthRozay wrote: »
    @bkkbully how're you working for tech firms an an audio engineer? like what're you doing?

    Most media outlets/companies are switching to digital content (online, YouTube, iPhone, iPad, NetFlix, iFlix, Amazon). Next time you're scrolling on Facebook or watching a video on your iPhone just listen to all of the sounds that generate from it. Someone made the Facebook *pop* sound when you like a post. Someone is recording the dialogue, mixing audio, and creating music for CNN's digital channel. There are thousands of tech companies that see the value in digital content, and will pay top dollar for it. This can include product videos, journalism, music, video games, etc.

    The last published project I did audio for hit 5 million views on YouTube in less than a week, and has been broadcasted to over 50 million people in the Asian region. My original music has never, and probably will never reach those types of numbers.
  • bkkbully
    bkkbully around the wayMembers Posts: 2,221 ✭✭✭✭✭
    DarthRozay wrote: »
    @bkkbully how're you working for tech firms an an audio engineer? like what're you doing?

    Also, do a quick search for sound designer jobs and you will see how many tech companies are actively searching for full time sound engineers to join their studio with FULL BENEFITS. Health, dental, paid vacation, - one company paid for my entire relocation move plus the first 6 months of my rent. It's out there. The music recording industry may be slowing up, but the audio industry is BOOMING.
  • Roster Player #99
    Roster Player #99 Members Posts: 4,237 ✭✭✭✭✭
    That's part in how Library companies and record labels started poppin up way back in the day. Producers who were much more profound composers or engineers or sound designers wanted to get their joints off. Companies like de Wolfe and Chappell capitalized that. That's resourcefulness and hustle.
  • silverfoxx
    silverfoxx Sion Guests, Members, Writer, Content Producer Posts: 11,704 ✭✭✭✭✭
    bkkbully wrote: »
    silverfoxx wrote: »
    bkkbully wrote: »
    silverfoxx wrote: »
    bkkbully wrote: »
    I did two audio internships while I was in university, each lasting for a year and a half. The first internship was for a digital media studio and gallery space in NYC which included doing udio production for film, sound installation for art exhibitions, setting up mics at press conferences, micing interviewers and interviewees, making music for radio introductions - basically a crash course in all things audio. It blew my mind because I was coming from a music studio perspective, but opened my eyes to how many jobs there are involving audio.

    The second internship was a no frills, Grammy award winning studio filled to the brim with experience and knowledge in all things for engineering music. Platinum engineers, producers, and artists from all genres rolled through, but mostly hip hop and R&B. I was able to listen, watch, and experience the creation of several dope albums, with a few Grammy winning singles. and then hear them on the radio four months later. We had to learn several Neve and SSL boards, and set up session for high end clients, and if you were dope you would be in the session running the patchbay.

    These type of internships are extremely valuable. In my case, I learned to use a wide range of audio gear with the quickness, know which microphones are best for the environment, and became used to being competitive among the tier of professionals. You figure out which kind of sound engineer you want to be. I originally wanted to be a sound engineer for music, but went to university for sound design for film, and now I'm overseas working as sound engineer for tech firms and starting my own digital media imprint at the end of the year.

    Be ready to work your ass off. This isn't an easy career path. Use your internships to be a better engineer and most importantly, a better communicator. Keep your (ears) eyes open and stay with the pace of the game, it moves fast but if you're smart and realise that audio is used for almost everything - you'll always have a job. Let me know if I can help with anything.

    Alot of jewels brother thank you. From my perspective, I'm currently interested for the networking opportunities. I'm also a music producer, so sound engineering is not much of a strength of mines. However, I'm willing to learn more about it, although folks have a clear cut vision and path strictly for sound engineering, paying massive amounts of money for audio schools so I feel like in that field I would be disadvantaged.

    Be careful with this, this is looked down upon in professional studios. There are tons of people who try to do music production from a sound engineering internship and get kicked out because chief engineers can see through it all. You can get blackballed from doing this because people will not take you serious. If you are going to do an engineering internship, you will strictly be doing engineering. Not production. There are very clear defined lines between the two once you get into higher levels of the game.
    Stew wrote: »
    My homeboy went to the Art Institute here in the A, he graduated, got an internship with Dallas Austin. They had him chasing coffee and donuts, he bounced, works 40 hrs behind a desk now. End of story.

    Yes, this is regular in big studios. This is a test. It's the seeding process. You will see who really wants this life and who doesn't very quickly. Your ego will eat at you. But the thought of reasoning behind this is - if you can't even get clients the right coffee, donut, and food orders - how can we trust you to run a session? There are literally no shortcuts in this profession. It's a tough life until you break through.

    So what's the outlet for music production? Why are people forced to strictly do sound engineering when both paths are completely different? Btw I appreciate you for informing me the expectations of folks within the studios.

    No one is forced to strictly sound engineering, these internships are for people who want to be only sound engineers. If you want to be a music producer than a sound engineering internship might not be the best thing for you. Very rarely does a true engineer cross over to a producer - stories like Just Blaze's are an exception not the norm. You don't need top sound engineering skills to be a great producer, you need to know how to network your ass off and have flames coming off your tracks. It's much easier to build with a few artists that you believe in, produce for them, and network like crazy and build your own wave. Your work ethic and your relationships will get you to the level you want to be at.

    Music production is more akin to entrepreneurship, whereas engineering is more a "stable" route. Both are incredibly challenging and competitive.

    You should look into composing internships and beat workshops - where you can shadow producers and composers making music for all kinds of different media. That might help you more than just going into sound engineering.

    Now a days they have these online MasterClasses with Hans Zimmer, DeadMau5, Herbie Hancock, and tons of other producers. You don't need an internship, you just need hustle and outside the box thinking. Let me talk to a few colleagues and see if I can find any resources for you.

    I apologise for my late response but you dropping alot of great advice that I'll look into. I'm not sure if you checked out my threads on here but ive posted plenty of music online. My biggest struggle is networking in person, as I met the wrong folks to network with who struggle with being as determined as me. Alot of time I would compose a full project and artists I work with would just sit on the project for months without putting out anything on social networking platforms. I myself do so, not frequently as I used to because honestly financially I been focused on working to move closer to the city to maneuver at networking events.

    We can definitely speak via pm more about this, I'm very interested to get your thoughts on my branding, as well as my music and other advice.

    I really appreciate it @bkkbully
  • bkkbully
    bkkbully around the wayMembers Posts: 2,221 ✭✭✭✭✭
    silverfoxx wrote: »
    bkkbully wrote: »
    silverfoxx wrote: »
    bkkbully wrote: »
    silverfoxx wrote: »
    bkkbully wrote: »
    I did two audio internships while I was in university, each lasting for a year and a half. The first internship was for a digital media studio and gallery space in NYC which included doing udio production for film, sound installation for art exhibitions, setting up mics at press conferences, micing interviewers and interviewees, making music for radio introductions - basically a crash course in all things audio. It blew my mind because I was coming from a music studio perspective, but opened my eyes to how many jobs there are involving audio.

    The second internship was a no frills, Grammy award winning studio filled to the brim with experience and knowledge in all things for engineering music. Platinum engineers, producers, and artists from all genres rolled through, but mostly hip hop and R&B. I was able to listen, watch, and experience the creation of several dope albums, with a few Grammy winning singles. and then hear them on the radio four months later. We had to learn several Neve and SSL boards, and set up session for high end clients, and if you were dope you would be in the session running the patchbay.

    These type of internships are extremely valuable. In my case, I learned to use a wide range of audio gear with the quickness, know which microphones are best for the environment, and became used to being competitive among the tier of professionals. You figure out which kind of sound engineer you want to be. I originally wanted to be a sound engineer for music, but went to university for sound design for film, and now I'm overseas working as sound engineer for tech firms and starting my own digital media imprint at the end of the year.

    Be ready to work your ass off. This isn't an easy career path. Use your internships to be a better engineer and most importantly, a better communicator. Keep your (ears) eyes open and stay with the pace of the game, it moves fast but if you're smart and realise that audio is used for almost everything - you'll always have a job. Let me know if I can help with anything.

    Alot of jewels brother thank you. From my perspective, I'm currently interested for the networking opportunities. I'm also a music producer, so sound engineering is not much of a strength of mines. However, I'm willing to learn more about it, although folks have a clear cut vision and path strictly for sound engineering, paying massive amounts of money for audio schools so I feel like in that field I would be disadvantaged.

    Be careful with this, this is looked down upon in professional studios. There are tons of people who try to do music production from a sound engineering internship and get kicked out because chief engineers can see through it all. You can get blackballed from doing this because people will not take you serious. If you are going to do an engineering internship, you will strictly be doing engineering. Not production. There are very clear defined lines between the two once you get into higher levels of the game.
    Stew wrote: »
    My homeboy went to the Art Institute here in the A, he graduated, got an internship with Dallas Austin. They had him chasing coffee and donuts, he bounced, works 40 hrs behind a desk now. End of story.

    Yes, this is regular in big studios. This is a test. It's the seeding process. You will see who really wants this life and who doesn't very quickly. Your ego will eat at you. But the thought of reasoning behind this is - if you can't even get clients the right coffee, donut, and food orders - how can we trust you to run a session? There are literally no shortcuts in this profession. It's a tough life until you break through.

    So what's the outlet for music production? Why are people forced to strictly do sound engineering when both paths are completely different? Btw I appreciate you for informing me the expectations of folks within the studios.

    No one is forced to strictly sound engineering, these internships are for people who want to be only sound engineers. If you want to be a music producer than a sound engineering internship might not be the best thing for you. Very rarely does a true engineer cross over to a producer - stories like Just Blaze's are an exception not the norm. You don't need top sound engineering skills to be a great producer, you need to know how to network your ass off and have flames coming off your tracks. It's much easier to build with a few artists that you believe in, produce for them, and network like crazy and build your own wave. Your work ethic and your relationships will get you to the level you want to be at.

    Music production is more akin to entrepreneurship, whereas engineering is more a "stable" route. Both are incredibly challenging and competitive.

    You should look into composing internships and beat workshops - where you can shadow producers and composers making music for all kinds of different media. That might help you more than just going into sound engineering.

    Now a days they have these online MasterClasses with Hans Zimmer, DeadMau5, Herbie Hancock, and tons of other producers. You don't need an internship, you just need hustle and outside the box thinking. Let me talk to a few colleagues and see if I can find any resources for you.

    I apologise for my late response but you dropping alot of great advice that I'll look into. I'm not sure if you checked out my threads on here but ive posted plenty of music online. My biggest struggle is networking in person, as I met the wrong folks to network with who struggle with being as determined as me. Alot of time I would compose a full project and artists I work with would just sit on the project for months without putting out anything on social networking platforms. I myself do so, not frequently as I used to because honestly financially I been focused on working to move closer to the city to maneuver at networking events.

    We can definitely speak via pm more about this, I'm very interested to get your thoughts on my branding, as well as my music and other advice.

    I really appreciate it @bkkbully

    Sure no doubt. Hit me when you can.
  • silverfoxx
    silverfoxx Sion Guests, Members, Writer, Content Producer Posts: 11,704 ✭✭✭✭✭
    bkkbully wrote: »
    silverfoxx wrote: »
    bkkbully wrote: »
    silverfoxx wrote: »
    bkkbully wrote: »
    silverfoxx wrote: »
    bkkbully wrote: »
    I did two audio internships while I was in university, each lasting for a year and a half. The first internship was for a digital media studio and gallery space in NYC which included doing udio production for film, sound installation for art exhibitions, setting up mics at press conferences, micing interviewers and interviewees, making music for radio introductions - basically a crash course in all things audio. It blew my mind because I was coming from a music studio perspective, but opened my eyes to how many jobs there are involving audio.

    The second internship was a no frills, Grammy award winning studio filled to the brim with experience and knowledge in all things for engineering music. Platinum engineers, producers, and artists from all genres rolled through, but mostly hip hop and R&B. I was able to listen, watch, and experience the creation of several dope albums, with a few Grammy winning singles. and then hear them on the radio four months later. We had to learn several Neve and SSL boards, and set up session for high end clients, and if you were dope you would be in the session running the patchbay.

    These type of internships are extremely valuable. In my case, I learned to use a wide range of audio gear with the quickness, know which microphones are best for the environment, and became used to being competitive among the tier of professionals. You figure out which kind of sound engineer you want to be. I originally wanted to be a sound engineer for music, but went to university for sound design for film, and now I'm overseas working as sound engineer for tech firms and starting my own digital media imprint at the end of the year.

    Be ready to work your ass off. This isn't an easy career path. Use your internships to be a better engineer and most importantly, a better communicator. Keep your (ears) eyes open and stay with the pace of the game, it moves fast but if you're smart and realise that audio is used for almost everything - you'll always have a job. Let me know if I can help with anything.

    Alot of jewels brother thank you. From my perspective, I'm currently interested for the networking opportunities. I'm also a music producer, so sound engineering is not much of a strength of mines. However, I'm willing to learn more about it, although folks have a clear cut vision and path strictly for sound engineering, paying massive amounts of money for audio schools so I feel like in that field I would be disadvantaged.

    Be careful with this, this is looked down upon in professional studios. There are tons of people who try to do music production from a sound engineering internship and get kicked out because chief engineers can see through it all. You can get blackballed from doing this because people will not take you serious. If you are going to do an engineering internship, you will strictly be doing engineering. Not production. There are very clear defined lines between the two once you get into higher levels of the game.
    Stew wrote: »
    My homeboy went to the Art Institute here in the A, he graduated, got an internship with Dallas Austin. They had him chasing coffee and donuts, he bounced, works 40 hrs behind a desk now. End of story.

    Yes, this is regular in big studios. This is a test. It's the seeding process. You will see who really wants this life and who doesn't very quickly. Your ego will eat at you. But the thought of reasoning behind this is - if you can't even get clients the right coffee, donut, and food orders - how can we trust you to run a session? There are literally no shortcuts in this profession. It's a tough life until you break through.

    So what's the outlet for music production? Why are people forced to strictly do sound engineering when both paths are completely different? Btw I appreciate you for informing me the expectations of folks within the studios.

    No one is forced to strictly sound engineering, these internships are for people who want to be only sound engineers. If you want to be a music producer than a sound engineering internship might not be the best thing for you. Very rarely does a true engineer cross over to a producer - stories like Just Blaze's are an exception not the norm. You don't need top sound engineering skills to be a great producer, you need to know how to network your ass off and have flames coming off your tracks. It's much easier to build with a few artists that you believe in, produce for them, and network like crazy and build your own wave. Your work ethic and your relationships will get you to the level you want to be at.

    Music production is more akin to entrepreneurship, whereas engineering is more a "stable" route. Both are incredibly challenging and competitive.

    You should look into composing internships and beat workshops - where you can shadow producers and composers making music for all kinds of different media. That might help you more than just going into sound engineering.

    Now a days they have these online MasterClasses with Hans Zimmer, DeadMau5, Herbie Hancock, and tons of other producers. You don't need an internship, you just need hustle and outside the box thinking. Let me talk to a few colleagues and see if I can find any resources for you.

    I apologise for my late response but you dropping alot of great advice that I'll look into. I'm not sure if you checked out my threads on here but ive posted plenty of music online. My biggest struggle is networking in person, as I met the wrong folks to network with who struggle with being as determined as me. Alot of time I would compose a full project and artists I work with would just sit on the project for months without putting out anything on social networking platforms. I myself do so, not frequently as I used to because honestly financially I been focused on working to move closer to the city to maneuver at networking events.

    We can definitely speak via pm more about this, I'm very interested to get your thoughts on my branding, as well as my music and other advice.

    I really appreciate it @bkkbully

    Sure no doubt. Hit me when you can.

    Word, just did brother.
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